Conviction politics: How convicts shaped Australian democracy (Monash University)

Monash University: Conviction politics: How convicts shaped Australian democracy. “Convicts aren’t often celebrated for their contribution to the nation’s progressive political traditions, and that’s something Associate Professor Tony Moore, Monash historian and head of Communications and Media Studies, is trying to change…. Dr Moore has received an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant of $757,205, together with cash contributions from industry partners of $310,000, to raise awareness of our convict legacy. The work partly involves coding, analysing and visualising recently digitised convict archives.”

ThePrint: Not just Modi’s museum for PMs, Indian MPs need archives and oral histories too

ThePrint: Not just Modi’s museum for PMs, Indian MPs need archives and oral histories too. “Nearly 500 Members of Parliament have passed away in the last fifteen years, 25 of them belonged to India’s first Lok Sabha. That is loss of history, not just human lives. An old African saying goes: When an old person dies, a whole library burns too. Members of Parliament negotiate, debate and decide on issues that shape our country and are an invaluable part of India’s legislative and deliberative history. With each death, Indians lose valuable institutional history of Parliament and personal memories of their leaders.”

Endangered Archives Blog: United National Independence Party of Zambia Archive Online

Endangered Archives Blog: United National Independence Party of Zambia Archive Online. “International Archives Day is celebrated annually on the 9 June – and I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to give an update on the archives of the United National Independence Party of Zambia (EAP121), a project that was funded in 2007.”

The Verge: 12 new projects will finally show us how Facebook is changing democracy

The Verge: 12 new projects will finally show us how Facebook is changing democracy. “Ever since the 2016 US election, some of the most urgent questions in tech have been about the impact of social media — Facebook, in particular. How much does fake news influence people’s opinions? Do filter bubbles lead to more polarized views? Why are people so inclined to share outrageous stories? Researchers have been looking at those questions for years, but actual experimental data has been hard to come by. But this summer, select researchers will get access to some of the most insightful social media data we have, direct from Facebook.”

Futuris: archiving popular dissent against communism (Euronews)

Euronews: Futuris: archiving popular dissent against communism. “A new European research project is working to preserve historical material related to cultural resistance from the communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. But how are they achieving that?”

Pew Global: International Publics Brace for Cyberattacks on Elections, Infrastructure, National Security

Pew Global: International Publics Brace for Cyberattacks on Elections, Infrastructure, National Security. “As the pace and magnitude of cyberattacks have increased around the world, a new survey shows that people in multiple countries think it is likely that government data, public infrastructure and elections will be targeted by future hacks. Opinion is mixed, however, on whether their nations are prepared for such events.”