The Daily Beast: Shadowy Facebook Ads That Pushed Trump Are Back in Alabama

The Daily Beast: Shadowy Facebook Ads That Pushed Trump Are Back in Alabama. “Yvonne Trosclair doesn’t know who’s behind America First Action—which keeps running pro-Roy Moore ads here on television and on Facebook ahead of the U.S. Senate election on Tuesday—but she knows they’re not from Alabama.”

Like It Or Not: How Facebook Reshaped Political Campaigns In Illinois (iWILL Radio)

iWILL Radio: Like It Or Not: How Facebook Reshaped Political Campaigns In Illinois. “Facebook is facing tough questions in the wake of the 2016 presidential election. Did Russians use social media to sway the election? Why is there so much fake news? Why isn’t Facebook more transparent? Similar questions are being asked here in Illinois, where Facebook has already reshaped political campaigns by offering candidates a cheap way to get their message out. Facebook has also significantly increased its campaign contributions to Illinois lawmakers in 2017, doling out $92,000 to dozens of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle—almost all of it within the last two months.” Interesting read.

OpenLearn: How did Facebook likes help Labour at the ballot box?

OpenLearn: How did Facebook likes help Labour at the ballot box?. “The 2017 election saw a stronger than foreseen performance by the Labour Party. Matt Walsh explains how Labour’s Facebook success played out, heralding the party’s overall campaign performance. GE2017 was a numbers game: by achieving very high levels of organic reach, Labour managed to target undecided voters in marginal constituencies, energise voters who had drifted away from the party, and mobilise the young.”

ProPublica: More Machine Learning About Congress’ Priorities

ProPublica: More Machine Learning About Congress’ Priorities. “Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is a tax wonk ― and most observers of Congress know that. But knowing what interests the other 434 members of Congress is harder. To make it easier to know what issues each lawmaker really focuses on, we’re launching a new feature in our Represent database called Policy Priorities. We had two goals in creating it: To help researchers and journalists understand what drives particular members of Congress and to enable regular citizens to compare their representatives’ priorities to their own and their communities.”

Phys.org: Twitter verboten? German parliament edict irks lawmakers

Phys.org: Twitter verboten? German parliament edict irks lawmakers. “Germany’s new parliamentary speaker is meeting resistance to his suggestion that lawmakers refrain from tweeting or snapping photos during sessions. Wolfgang Schaeuble, who served as Germany’s Finance Minister until being elected parliamentary speaker last month, told lawmakers in a memo that the use of devices ‘to photograph, tweet or distribute information about the session’ is ‘inappropriate and thus undesired.'”

South China Morning Post: Social media posts supporting Hong Kong poll candidates can land you in jail for 3 years, but relaxation of rules in sight

South China Morning Post: Social media posts supporting Hong Kong poll candidates can land you in jail for 3 years, but relaxation of rules in sight. “Expressing support for a Hong Kong election candidate on social media would no longer be a criminal offence in future under a government plan to relax the city’s strict rules on what constitutes an election advert.”

Exclusive: Russia Activated Twitter Sleeper Cells for 2016 Election Day Blitz (The Daily Beast)

The Daily Beast: Exclusive: Russia Activated Twitter Sleeper Cells for 2016 Election Day Blitz. “The Daily Beast analyzed a dataset of 6.5 million tweets containing election keywords like ‘Hillary’ and ‘Trump’ that was collected over 33 hours last Nov. 7-9 by Baltimore-based data scientist Chris Albon. The data are not comprehensive—only tweets with one of the keywords were collected, and limitations in Twitter’s API prevent a full capture even of those. But they represent a significant sampling of Election Day Twitter.”