Washington Post: Tech giants led by Amazon, Facebook and Google spent nearly half a billion on lobbying over the past decade, new data shows

Washington Post: Tech giants led by Amazon, Facebook and Google spent nearly half a billion on lobbying over the past decade, new data shows. “Ten years ago, Google executives rarely spoke to Congress. Amazon employed just two of its own registered lobbyists in Washington. And Facebook had only recently graduated to a real office after running its D.C. operation out of an employee’s living room. Since then, though, these technology companies have evolved into some of the most potent political forces in the nation’s capital, a Washington Post analysis of new federal records reveals, with just seven tech giants accounting for nearly half a billion dollars in lobbying over the past decade.”

WGBH: Historic Television Broadcasts Documenting the Conservative Movement in the 1960s Released by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH: Historic Television Broadcasts Documenting the Conservative Movement in the 1960s Released by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. “Rescued from deteriorating videotape and film, 21 National Education Television (NET) programs produced between 1956 and 1970 explore multiple perspectives on the modern conservative movement. The programs are now available for online viewing, many for the first time since their original broadcast.”

Reuters: Where U.S. presidential candidates stand on breaking up Big Tech

Reuters: Where U.S. presidential candidates stand on breaking up Big Tech. “Social media platforms are under particular scrutiny over their efforts to curb dissemination of misinformation and false claims, years after U.S. intelligence agencies said Russia used them to wage an influence operation aimed at interfering with the 2016 election. Moscow has denied the claim. Here are the leading presidential candidates’ positions on Big Tech.”

Data from Behind Enemy Lines: How Russia May have Used Twitter to Seize Crimea (UC San Diego)

UC San Diego: Data from Behind Enemy Lines: How Russia May have Used Twitter to Seize Crimea. “Online discourse by users of social media can provide important clues about the political dispositions of communities. New research suggests it can even be used by governments as a source of military intelligence to estimate prospective casualties and costs incurred from occupying foreign territories.”

State Library of Massachusetts: The Legislative Paper Processing Project at State Library

State Library of Massachusetts: The Legislative Paper Processing Project at State Library. “For each collection, [the] work includes biographical research on the legislator; an initial survey of the unprocessed papers; writing a processing plan, including deciding on series and arrangement; sorting the papers; re-housing materials when necessary; writing a finding aid; creating a record for our online catalog; and depositing the finding aid in our digital repository, DSpace. They will also write a blog post for each completed collection.”

Delaware Online: Introducing ‘Know Your Legislator,’ a tool for learning more about your state lawmakers

Delaware Online: Introducing ‘Know Your Legislator,’ a tool for learning more about your state lawmakers. “What state Senate district am I in? Who represents me in Dover? Where do my representatives stand on the issues? These are the types of questions that Delaware Online wants to help you answer. Today we launched ‘Know Your Legislator,’ a tool connecting readers to information about their representatives.”

National Post (Canada): Follow the Money – Welcome

National Post (Canada): Follow the Money – Welcome. “There is no tracking of donations made on a national scale. There are no consistent rules — or penalties — for political financing across Canada. Spending limits, out-of-province and foreign gifts, money from unions and corporations, donations from numbered companies: in some places anything goes, in others regulations are rarely enforced. The Follow the Money project is an effort to address these gaps, and hold politicians to account for gifts large and small. ”