TechCrunch: The nation-state of the internet

TechCrunch: The nation-state of the internet. “The internet is a community, but can it be a nation-state? It’s a question that I have been pondering on and off this year, what with the rise of digital nomads and the deeply libertarian ethos baked into parts of the blockchain community. It’s clearly on a lot of other people’s minds as well: when we interviewed Matt Howard of Norwest on Equity a few weeks back, he noted (unprompted) that Uber is one of the few companies that could reach ‘nation-state’ status when it IPOs. Clearly, the internet is home to many, diverse communities of similar-minded people, but how do those communities transmute from disparate bands into a nation-state?”

Neowin: Facebook to bolster Indian political ads transparency

Neowin: Facebook to bolster Indian political ads transparency. “Facebook has announced that it is taking steps to bring transparency to political ads running in India. The move follows similar rollouts to the U.S., Brazil, and the UK. The move is in anticipation of India’s general election next year and Facebook doesn’t want its platform to be misused by malicious entities to spread false information during the process.”

Politico: EU to ask Facebook, Twitter, Google for monthly ‘fake news’ reports

Politico: EU to ask Facebook, Twitter, Google for monthly ‘fake news’ reports. “The European Commission is planning to ask social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and Google for monthly reports on Russian disinformation campaigns ahead of the European election next May, two EU officials told POLITICO.”

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers. “[Jonathan] Albright, director of the Digital Forensics Initiative at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, spent months digging into the analytics of Facebook posts, political ads and private groups to determine how the platform was influencing the election. The result is a three-part analysis of misinformation on the social media platform, which he published days before the United States midterms earlier this month. Three months and 1,000 screenshots later, he found that, while the technology company has made strides in limiting the spread of misinformation over the past couple of years, there’s still plenty of fakery on the platform.”

Imperial & Global Forum: Amazing new digital archive of political maps for imperial and global historians

Imperial & Global Forum: Amazing new digital archive of political maps for imperial and global historians. “In case you missed it (I was tweeting about it A LOT last week), Cornell Library’s Digital Collections have just made available an amazing archive – the PJ Mode Collection – consisting of around 800 political maps that should be on the radar of anyone working on imperial and global history. They. Are. Awesome.”

City A.M.: Report slams tech giants for lack of political lobbying transparency

City A.M.: Report slams tech giants for lack of political lobbying transparency. “Tech behemoths Amazon, Facebook and Google are among the worst-performing companies for political lobbying transparency, according to a new report from Transparency International UK.”

Ars Technica: Newly elected Republican senator could be Google’s fiercest critic

Ars Technica: Newly elected Republican senator could be Google’s fiercest critic. “Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley’s defeat of Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in the 2018 midterm elections earlier this month was a big deal from almost any point of view. Missouri was a pivotal swing state in the battle for the Senate, and Hawley’s victory helped Republicans expand their slim Senate majority. But Hawley’s victory is an ominous sign for one company in particular: Google. Hawley campaigned as an antagonist to big technology companies in general and Google in particular.”