Pew: Three Months In, Many Americans See Exaggeration, Conspiracy Theories and Partisanship in COVID-19 News

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!- yes, I must do it here too.): Three Months In, Many Americans See Exaggeration, Conspiracy Theories and Partisanship in COVID-19 News. “As Americans continue to process a steady flow of information about the coronavirus outbreak – from changing infection and death rates to new testing protocols and evolving social distancing guidelines – they give the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other public health organizations the highest rating when it comes to getting the facts right. And they give Donald Trump and his administration the lowest rating for ‘getting the facts right’ among five key sources of COVID-19 information, according to a Pew Research Center survey of 9,654 U.S. adults conducted June 4-10, 2020, as part of the American News Pathways project.”

NBC News: Sixty percent believe worst is yet to come for the U.S. in coronavirus pandemic

NBC News: Sixty percent believe worst is yet to come for the U.S. in coronavirus pandemic. “A majority of American voters say they’re worried that someone in their immediate family might catch the coronavirus, and 6 in 10 believe the worst is yet to come in the U.S., according to a new national NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.”

Techdirt: Turns Out Most People Still Don’t Hate ‘Big Internet’ As Much As Politicians And The Media Want Them To

Techdirt: Turns Out Most People Still Don’t Hate ‘Big Internet’ As Much As Politicians And The Media Want Them To. “The good folks over at The Verge have done a big consumer survey of people’s general opinions of various big internet companies and it shows that most people still like these internet services, and believe, on the whole, that they make their lives better, not worse. Even the services that get the ‘worst’ grades, still get over a 60% ‘favorable’ rating, while Amazon, Google, YouTube, Netflix, Microsoft, and Apple all come in over 80% positive (with Amazon, Google, and YouTube breaking 90%).”

BusinessWire: Democracy Fund, UCLA Release First Dataset From Largest 2020 Public Opinion Study (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Democracy Fund, UCLA Release First Dataset From Largest 2020 Public Opinion Study (PRESS RELEASE). “The Democracy Fund Voter Study Group and UCLA today released the first dataset from its massive study of the American electorate. The project completes roughly 6,250 interviews each week – totaling 500,000 interviews in advance of the 2020 election. This data release promotes a better understanding of Americans’ views in this vitally important election year.”

Cornell Chronicle: Roper Center gives voice to American public opinion

Cornell Chronicle: Roper Center gives voice to American public opinion. “With voting to select this year’s presidential nominees in full swing, the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell has launched a series of initiatives to help inform citizens and journalists and support the democratic process. Their goal: to bring public opinion back to the public.”

Poynter: Poll results are about to flood news feeds across the United States. Here’s what voters should look for when reading them.

Poynter: Poll results are about to flood news feeds across the United States. Here’s what voters should look for when reading them.. “As the 2020 election pushes ahead, voters will be seeing poll results in their news feed — lots of them. But not all polls are created equal, and it can be hard to put the results into the proper context. PolitiFact participated in a workshop hosted by the Poynter Institute (which owns PolitiFact) on understanding election polling. Here are some suggestions about what voters should pay attention to when reading polls.”

Pew: What our transition to online polling means for decades of phone survey trends

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW): What our transition to online polling means for decades of phone survey trends. “The fact that many public opinion surveys today are conducted online is no secret to avid poll watchers. What is not well known, however, is what this migration to online polling means for the country’s trove of data documenting American public opinion over the past four decades, on issues ranging from abortion and immigration to race relations and military interventions. Specifically, can pollsters just add new online results to a long chain of phone survey results, or is this an apples-to-oranges situation that requires us to essentially throw out the historical data and start anew?”

Ontario Council of University Libraries: Ontario University Libraries openly release over seven decades of historical public opinion polls and guide

Thanks to Paul P. for this heads-up from Ontario Council of University Libraries: Ontario University Libraries openly release over seven decades of historical public opinion polls and guide. “In advancement of library open access and collaborative stewardship of digital data in Canada, Ontario university libraries are pleased to announce the release of over seven decades of important public opinion data to the broader academic community and the public.”

Cornell University: Roper Center to create world’s most comprehensive health opinion database

Cornell University: Roper Center to create world’s most comprehensive health opinion database. “The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, housed at Cornell, has been awarded a grant to provide an easily searchable portal on the public’s views about health dating back to 1935.”

The Verge: Facebook hired a full-time pollster to monitor Zuckerberg’s approval ratings

The Verge: Facebook hired a full-time pollster to monitor Zuckerberg’s approval ratings. “Tavis McGinn applied for a job at Facebook last year hoping to work in market research. He had previously spent three years at Google, where he helped large advertisers refine their marketing campaigns across the company’s family of products. But part way through the interview process at Facebook, the recruiter told McGinn the company had something else in mind for him. How would he like to track the public perception of Mark Zuckerberg?”

TechRadar: Facebook now lets you make two-option polls with GIFs and photos

TechRadar: Facebook now lets you make two-option polls with GIFs and photos. “Two years ago Twitter started letting its users create polls for just about everything, making it easier for them to learn whether their followers prefer Westworld or Stranger Things, or decide whether they should have beef bourguignon or Cinnamon Toast Crunch for dinner. And now, at last, Facebook is getting in on the polling action as well.”

ZDNet: Republican polling firm’s database was hacked, exposing donor records

ZDNet: Republican polling firm’s database was hacked, exposing donor records. “A Republican phone polling firm has been hacked, exposing data on hundreds of thousands of Americans who submitted donations to political campaigns, ZDNet has learned. Several database files, one of which totaled 223 gigabytes in size and amountied to about two billion lines of data, was stolen in January from Victory Phones, a Grand Rapids, MI-based automated phone research and data compilation firm.”

OCUL: Wilfrid Laurier University makes nationally significant Ipsos polling data freely available to the world

From the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL): Wilfrid Laurier University makes nationally significant Ipsos polling data freely available to the world. “Wilfrid Laurier University, in collaboration with the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL), is making a trove of nationally significant polling data, donated by market research firm Ipsos Canada, freely available to the world online. The data – now available on OCUL’s Scholars Portal Dataverse and platforms – come from a range of opinion polls and surveys on topics such as national and provincial politics, real estate buying habits, and Canadian heritage, among others.”