Chemical & Engineering News: New database amasses toxicity studies on PFAS

Chemical & Engineering News: New database amasses toxicity studies on PFAS. “A first-of-its-kind database assembles hundreds of toxicology studies on 29 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The database is aimed at assisting communities exposed to PFAS contamination and helping policy makers access scientific literature on these substances, says Katherine E. Pelch, a professor at the University of North Texas School of Public Health.”

Traverse City Record-Eagle: Find balloon debris? Get a photo and send to new website

Traverse City Record-Eagle: Find balloon debris? Get a photo and send to new website. “A university researcher is tracking balloon litter in the Great Lakes region to spread awareness of how it harms the environment. Lara O’Brien, a master’s student at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability, created [the site] to help citizen scientists track where popular balloon launches end. It maps where the balloons are found and allows people to submit photos of the debris.”

Times Herald-Record: State watchdog group expands online water-purity database

Times Herald-Record: State watchdog group expands online water-purity database. “A nonprofit government and environmental watchdog group has improved a searchable database for the public to learn about purity threats to local public tap-water supplies. A year ago, the New York Public Interest Research Group unveiled ‘What’s in my Water?’… which makes most water-supply records searchable by zip code. NYPIRG recently added more information about local contaminants in water supplies, made the site more user-friendly and provided resources about private well water testing.

Fair Warning: New Lookup to Tell You What’s in Your Water

Fair Warning: New Lookup to Tell You What’s in Your Water. “Want to know what hazards might be lurking in your local water supply? An updated online database launched today by the Environmental Working Group, a research and advocacy organization, provides some answers. The online resource is known as the EWG’s Tap Water Database. It lists contaminants as well as their levels and likely sources, and any federal drinking water violations by local water utilities. Consumers, after typing in their zip code, get a detailed analysis based on testing from 2010 through 2015.”