Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Covid Plus Decades of Pollution Are a Nasty Combo for Detroit

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Covid Plus Decades of Pollution Are a Nasty Combo for Detroit. “For decades, Black Americans like [Theresa] Landrum, who’s in her 60s and describes herself as a 48217 environmental-justice activist, have fought to limit industrial emissions in their neighborhoods. More than two dozen industrial sites surround hers. People in 48217 live on average seven fewer years than in the country as a whole, and asthma hospitalization rates in the area are more than twice as high as those of Michigan and about five times higher than those of the U.S.”

Coronavirus: How pollution could make India’s Covid fight tougher (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: How pollution could make India’s Covid fight tougher. “A Harvard University study shows that an increase of only one microgram per cubic metre in PM 2.5 – dangerous tiny pollutants in the air – is associated with an 8% increase in the Covid-19 death rate. Another study by scientists at the UK’s University of Cambridge also found a link between the severity of Covid-19 infection and long-term exposure to air pollutants, including nitrogen oxides and ground-level ozone from car exhaust fumes or burning of fossil fuels.”

Boiling Point: These maps show how air pollution and COVID-19 can be a deadly mix (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Boiling Point: These maps show how air pollution and COVID-19 can be a deadly mix. “During a news cycle dominated by COVID-19 infections spreading through the White House as President Trump and his associates flout public health guidelines, I’ve been thinking about some of the people suffering the most from this virus: Black people and Latinos, who are more likely to get sick and more likely to die than white people. I’ve also been thinking about the links between poor air quality and risk of contracting coronavirus, and the fact that people of color are more likely to breathe polluted air due to decades of racist housing and environmental policies.”

Lockdown air pollution: Nitrogen dioxide halved, but sulphur dioxide doubled (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Lockdown air pollution: Nitrogen dioxide halved, but sulphur dioxide doubled. “A University of Liverpool study of air pollution in the UK during the first 100 days of lockdown has revealed that whilst nitrogen oxide levels were cut by half, levels of sulfur dioxide increased by over 100%.”

ProPublica: New Research Shows Disproportionate Rate of Coronavirus Deaths in Polluted Areas

ProPublica: New Research Shows Disproportionate Rate of Coronavirus Deaths in Polluted Areas. “The industrial plants in the riverside Louisiana city of Port Allen have worried Diana LeBlanc since her children were young. In 1978, an explosion at the nearby Placid oil refinery forced her family to evacuate. ‘We had to leave in the middle of the night with two babies,’ said LeBlanc, now 70. ‘I always had to be on the alert.’ LeBlanc worried an industrial accident would endanger her family. But she now thinks the threat was more insidious. LeBlanc, who has asthma, believes the symptoms she experienced while sick with the coronavirus were made worse by decades of breathing in toxic air pollution.”

DuurZaam Nieuws: Database reveals worst polluters in Europe

DuurZaam Nieuws : Database reveals worst polluters in Europe. “The Industrial Plant Data Viewer allows users to access and compare data from over 3,000 large combustion plants across the EU, and check whether they are doing their job to prevent pollution. It was launched by the European Environmental Bureau to help fill the dramatic transparency gap in EU industrial emissions reporting.”

Phys .org: Lockdown did not reduce ‘most harmful’ type of air pollution in Scotland

Phys .org: Lockdown did not reduce ‘most harmful’ type of air pollution in Scotland. “The significant reduction in vehicle journeys during the COVID-19 lockdown did not reduce the level of toxic fine particles in Scotland’s air, according to experts at the University of Stirling. Analysis of fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) in the first month of restrictions found little change—despite a 65 percent reduction in the number of vehicles on the country’s roads.”

Mother Jones: How Trees Can Help Us Fight a Pandemic

Mother Jones: How Trees Can Help Us Fight a Pandemic. “As the world grapples with the devastation of the coronavirus, one thing is clear: The United States simply wasn’t prepared. Despite repeated warnings from infectious disease experts over the years, we lacked essential beds, equipment, and medication; public health advice was confusing, and our leadership offered no clear direction while sidelining credible health professionals and institutions. Infectious disease experts agree that it’s only a matter of time before the next pandemic hits, and that could be even deadlier. How do we fix what COVID-19 has shown was broken? In this Mother Jones series, we’re asking experts from a wide range of disciplines one question: What are the most important steps we can take to make sure we’re better prepared next time?”

Phys .org: EPA’s relaxed enforcement of pollution reporting due to COVID-19 ends in August

Phys .org: EPA’s relaxed enforcement of pollution reporting due to COVID-19 ends in August. “The Environmental Protection Agency will end a temporary policy that relaxed reporting requirements on pollutants due to the coronavirus at the end of August, amid criticism that the pandemic policy has jeopardized public health.”

Fast Company: Masks, gloves, and other coronavirus waste are starting to fill up our oceans

Fast Company: Masks, gloves, and other coronavirus waste are starting to fill up our oceans. “It’s not news that our trash eventually finds its way to the ocean. Because oceans are downstream, litter will eventually find a pathway into our bodies of water if it’s not discarded properly—and often even if it is. But as the COVID-19 crisis slowly generates a new kind of waste, made up of disposable masks and other PPE items, it’s posing new problems for the Earth’s oceans. The flood of PPE could cause immediate danger to wildlife and long-term plastic pollution that threatens to contaminate food supplies.”

TechCrunch: Aclima and Google release a new air quality data set for researchers to investigate California pollution

TechCrunch: Aclima and Google release a new air quality data set for researchers to investigate California pollution. “As part of the Collision from Home conference, Aclima chief executive Davida Herzl released a new data set made in conjunction with Google. Free to the scientific community, the data is the culmination of four years of data collection and aggregation resulting in 42 million air quality measurements throughout the state of California.”

Caltech: Even During Pandemic Lockdown, Air Quality Remained Poor in Parts of China

Caltech: Even During Pandemic Lockdown, Air Quality Remained Poor in Parts of China. “The viral before-and-after images of improved air quality around the world resulting from the COVID-19 lockdown may not paint an entirely accurate picture, at least not in China. According to a new study published on June 17 in the journal Science, although there was a dramatic reduction in pollution emission during the lockdown that far outstripped the ‘Olympic Blue’ efforts the nation used to temporarily combat air pollution ahead of the Beijing Olympics, other factors involving complex atmospheric chemistry and meteorological variations have offset the influence of emission reduction. This has led to a counterintuitive deterioration in air quality in Beijing and other cities in northern China during the COVID-19 lockdown.”

International Atomic Energy Agency: New IAEA Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Database Facilitates National Data Reporting and Sharing

International Atomic Energy Agency: New IAEA Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Database Facilitates National Data Reporting and Sharing . “The Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Information System (SRIS) will provide an authoritative and integrated view of national and global spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories as well as relevant laws, regulations, policies, plans and activities. The IAEA is encouraging national authorities to take advantage of this important new tool by nominating representatives responsible for submitting data to SRIS, part of which will be available to the public and other countries using the system. So far, 38 countries have done so.”