The Register: Google’s Hollywood ‘interventions’ made on-screen coders cooler

The Register: Google’s Hollywood ‘interventions’ made on-screen coders cooler. “Google operates a ‘Computer Science in Media Team’ that stages ‘interventions’ in Hollywood to steer film-makers towards realistic and accurate depictions of what it’s like to work in IT. The company announced the team in 2015 and gave it the job of ‘making CS more appealing to a wider audience, by dispelling stereotypes and showcasing positive portrayals of underrepresented minorities in tech.’ … The efforts of that team have now been detailed in a study [PDF], Cracking the Code: The Prevalence and Nature of Computer Science Depictions in Media.”

XXL: Bun B’s Wife Says UGK Archives Are Destroyed Due to Hurricane Harvey

XXL: Bun B’s Wife Says UGK Archives Are Destroyed Due to Hurricane Harvey. “On Wednesday (Aug. 30), Bun B’s wife Queenie posted a message revealing Pimp C’s son was stuck at his grandmother’s house in six feet of water. In the caption of the photo, Queenie also revealed everything that was left of the UGK archives was now gone. It’s uncertain what was included in the archives. Chinara Butler, Pimp C’s widow, also reposted the photo from Queenie from another account.” UGK was a hip-hop duo from Port Arthur, Texas. Bun B is still around but Pimp C died in 2007.

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized

University of California Riverside: Nearly 6,000 Photographs from the Jay Kay Klein Papers Have Been Digitized. “The California Digital Library and the UCR Library recently partnered to digitize nearly 6,000 photographs from the Jay Kay Klein papers – and completed the task in less than two days…. This was the first in a series of pilot projects to use Pixel Acuity’s specialized mass digitization process to make more of the UCR Library’s non-book collections available online. For this inaugural project, [Eric] Milenkiewicz selected 35mm negatives from the Eaton Collection’s Jay Kay Klein papers (MS 381),documenting the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) from 1960-1971.”

TechCrunch: ‘Despacito’ is the new most-watched YouTube video ever with more than 3 billion views

TechCrunch: ‘Despacito’ is the new most-watched YouTube video ever with more than 3 billion views. “Luis Fonsi’s ‘Despacito ft. Daddy Yankee’ is not only the most-streamed song of all time, it also is the most-watched YouTube video ever, surpassing more than 3 billion views on the Alphabet-owned video site.” This is how I know I am old: I have yet to hear this song.

AV Club: Rick And Morty now has its own Frinkiac

AV Club: Rick And Morty now has its own Frinkiac. “Frinkiac—the searchable database of Simpsons images and GIFs created by Paul Kehrer, Sean Schulte, and Allie Young—is one of the delights of the internet, an at-your-finger repository of every ‘Glavin,’ ‘Ha-Ha,’ and ‘My son is also named Bort’ a conversation might demand. (The team also created Morbotron, its non-union, Futurama equivalent.) Now, Rick And Morty—no stranger to smashing its way into the world of Springfield—is getting in on the screen-capped fun, thanks to Master Of All Science, the trio’s latest project.”

Pitchfork: Neil Young Announces Massive, Interactive Online Archive

Pitchfork: Neil Young Announces Massive, Interactive Online Archive. “Neil Young recently announced the release of Hitchhiker, a long-lost album he recorded back in 1976. In a new note posted on his website, Young confirms that there is plenty more archival material on the way. While Young has been prolifically releasing material through his Neil Young Archives series—including live shows, remastered albums, and box sets—he has now announced a massive new online component.”

KCET: Bright Colors, Big City: One Man’s Massive Collection of Postwar California Print Media

New to me, from KCET: Bright Colors, Big City: One Man’s Massive Collection of Postwar California Print Media. “Inside a cheerful Koreatown home, the promise of post-war Los Angeles is spread across the kitchen table. It is but a fraction of the collection of J.J. Englender, curator of the vivid online archive ADSAUSAGE. There are local magazines, ad inserts, teen ‘zines, and trade brochures, all brightly colored and striking, advertising the growth and vibrancy of 1950s-‘80s California. They are the tangible embodiment of the dreams of Englender, a friendly, optimistic man, whose childhood love of 20th-century kitsch and Hollywood has grown into an archive of thousands of pieces.”