Washington Post: The Smithsonian is digitizing political and military posters — 18,000 of them

Washington Post: The Smithsonian is digitizing political and military posters — 18,000 of them. “…the National Museum of American History is now finishing a massive project to digitize 18,000 of its old political and military posters to make them easily accessible and to expand awareness of figures and issues long vanished from the headlines. [Kelly] Manno and [Amelia] Brookins, both 26, and colleague Thomas English, 31, have been working since December in a makeshift photography studio in the museum, cranking out more than 200 digitized images a day.” The posters are expected to be online by late summer.

WittySparks: DesignCap – Free Online Poster Design Tool

Witty Sparks: DesignCap – Free Online Poster Design Tool. “DesignCap is a free poster making tool that helps users create stunning posters in minutes online, no registration or installation needed. All the whole design processes are done on the web. It offers a large number of templates for posters and flyers.” The English in this article is a little awkward, but it doesn’t detract from the usefulness of the article.

New Archive: Anthology Poster Collection (The Writing University)

The Writing University: New Archive: Anthology Poster Collection. “The Writing University is proud to announce a new digital archive: the Anthology Letterpress Poster Collection. The Writing University has created an archival and digital collection to preserve and display the one-of-a-kind posters created for the Anthology Reading Series. The new online collection was created in conjunction with the Center for the Book, the UI Library Special Collections department and the Iowa Digital Library.”

24700: Time Traveling Through CalArts’s Poster Archive With Michael Worthington

24700: Time Traveling Through CalArts’s Poster Archive With Michael Worthington. “In 1994, Graphic Design faculty members Shelley Stepp and Kary Arimoto-Mercer created a physical archive for the posters as a way to preserve students’ work. From their initial efforts, the physical archive has grown exponentially, requiring that the posters be stored in various corners of offices across the Graphic Design program. Without a central location or means to access the physical poster archive, Graphic Design faculty Michael Worthington devised a plan to consolidate the work into a digital space, a platform that could be made available online to alumni and current students, as well as to CalArts and design communities at large.”

WBUR: You Can Now See The Posters From Boston’s Women’s March Online

WBUR: You Can Now See The Posters From Boston’s Women’s March Online . This is the 2017 march, not the 2018 march. “Ever wonder what happened to the signs from the Women’s March in Boston last year? With the help of Northeastern University, a team of scholars, students and volunteers created an online archive of more than 6,000 posters and pieces of artwork from the Jan. 21, 2017 protest.”

University of Southern California: New Digital Collection of Political Graphics from the LGBTQ Civil Rights Struggles

University of Southern California: New Digital Collection of Political Graphics from the LGBTQ Civil Rights Struggles. “With generous support from the Council on Library and Information Resources, ONE Archives at the USC Libraries is embarking on a project to create a new digital collection of political posters and signs from protests and pride celebrations dating to the origins of LGBTQ civil rights movements in the 1950s and 1960s. Upon completion of the two-year project, which is made possible by a grant under CLIR’s Digitizing Hidden Collections program, 4,200 political graphics from ONE’s unparalleled collections will be accessible via the USC Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America.”