GeekWire: Seattle startup Lalo is latest ‘death tech’ innovator, with an app to share and collect stories and more

GeekWire: Seattle startup Lalo is latest ‘death tech’ innovator, with an app to share and collect stories and more. “Currently operating as a small, private beta, Lalo is an app that facilitates the collection of digital content such as images, video, voice, text and more. Away from the noise and common pitfalls of traditional social media platforms, groups are intentionally kept small to foster increased trust and privacy. Imagine family members gathering to collect the best recipes in one space or share images that might have been lost to an unseen photo album.”

RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media (TorrentFreak)

TorrentFreak: RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media. “The dead are more alive than ever. Thanks to social media and inherited ‘intellectual property rights,’ stars of the past enjoy digital immortality. Icons including Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, and John Lennon remain active on blue-checkmarked social media accounts that are often controlled by for-profit corporations, which don’t require a family tie to the deceased.”

TechCrunch: AI-driven audio cloning startup gives voice to Einstein chatbot

TechCrunch: AI-driven audio cloning startup gives voice to Einstein chatbot. “You’ll need to prick up your ears for this slice of deepfakery emerging from the wacky world of synthesized media: A digital version of Albert Einstein — with a synthesized voice that’s been (re)created using AI voice cloning technology drawing on audio recordings of the famous scientist’s actual voice.”

CNET: William Shatner turns 90, AI version of him will live on indefinitely

CNET: William Shatner turns 90, AI version of him will live on indefinitely. “Captain James T. Kirk, 90 years old? The flirtatious caption of Star Trek’s Enterprise will always be young on screen, but the actor who played him, William Shatner, turned 90 on Monday. And he announced that he’s creating an interactive AI-powered video ‘so family and friends can interact with him for years to come.’”

Ubergizmo: Virtual Reality Helped A Husband Meet His Deceased Wife One More Time

Ubergizmo: Virtual Reality Helped A Husband Meet His Deceased Wife One More Time. “In a new documentary on MBC, one of South Korea’s major broadcasting networks, it showed how the use of VR helped a husband meet his deceased wife one more time, where he also got to interact with her through VR and speak to her. According to the man, 51-year old Kim Jung Soo, he had expressed his hopes at seeing his wife again, and this experience allowed him to do just that.” I recommend you do not look at the video accompanying this article unless you’ve got a supply of tissues.

Slate: Sharing My Husband’s Digital Afterlife

Slate: Sharing My Husband’s Digital Afterlife. “Navigating the bureaucracy of death is an unavoidable, time-consuming, and tedious affair. Call the bank to remove his name from our joint checking account, call credit card companies to cancel his cards, call the car insurance company to delete his vehicle from our policy, call to end the memberships he had and I couldn’t afford to keep. These are also one-dimensional tasks. No one can like, share, or comment on them. With his death, my husband killed their significance. But there was one account I did not close, at least not entirely. On days that I missed him more than the usual everyday missing of him, I’d tell Siri to call him so I could see his name and number pop on the screen.”

Slate: Grieving With Google Street View

Slate: Grieving With Google Street View. “One Twitter user recently posted that her family never got to say goodbye to her grandpa when he died a few years ago, but when she visited her grandpa’s farm through Street View, there he was, sitting at the end of the road. Thousands of people responded, many with their own stories of finding old Street View shots of their dearly departed grandmas reclining in their front yards or their grandpas getting into their trucks.”

RIP: How to stop Facebook from stealing your data after you die (The Next Web)

The Next Web: RIP: How to stop Facebook from stealing your data after you die. “Inevitably, one day you’re going to die. While you may think your online identity will go to the grave with you, that’s not always how it works out. Without setting your account to self-implode or handing your login details to a trusted person, companies like Facebook and Google will carry on storing your data and everything else they’ve got on you.”

Globe and Mail: Pressing Google and Facebook for answers in her son’s death, an Ontario mother stirs the digital-privacy debate

Globe and Mail: Pressing Google and Facebook for answers in her son’s death, an Ontario mother stirs the digital-privacy debate. “Maureen Henry thinks her son’s online messages could help explain how he ended up dead in Lake Ontario five years ago. She’s fighting U.S. technology companies in court to access them in a case with complicated implications.”

Ars Technica: The DMCA bell did not toll for a beloved musician—thus, I could grieve him

Ars Technica: The DMCA bell did not toll for a beloved musician—thus, I could grieve him. “I will never see my favorite songwriter in concert, right in front of me, reacting to my cheers and enthusiasm. But if any performer was going to vanish just as I teetered into my concert-going years, at least this one had some surprises for me five, 10, even 20 years later, all just a few mouse-clicks away.”