University of Massachusetts Amherst: Geoscientist Awarded $2.1m Grant To Create Global Open-source Software System For Tracking Water And Sediment In Earth’s Rivers Using NASA Satellite Data

University of Massachusetts Amherst: Geoscientist Awarded $2.1m Grant To Create Global Open-source Software System For Tracking Water And Sediment In Earth’s Rivers Using NASA Satellite Data. “University of Massachusetts geoscientist and engineer Colin Gleason has received a $2.1 NASA million grant to work with computer science colleagues at UMass Amherst and the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., to create a cloud-based software system providing unprecedented public access to satellite data on Earth’s water quantity and quality.”

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens. “Throughout history, important cities around the world have flourished along river banks. But rivers can also be destructive forces. They routinely flood, and on rare occasions, they can abruptly shift pathways. These ‘channel-jumping’ events, which are called avulsions, have caused some of the deadliest floods in human history…. In a newly published study, I worked with colleagues to map the global distribution of avulsions on river fans and deltas. We used satellite images of over 100 rivers from 1973 to the present, providing a half-century of bird’s-eye views of global river evolution.”

Navajo-Hopi Observer: Native voices share cultural ties to Little Colorado River

Navajo-Hopi Observer: Native voices share cultural ties to Little Colorado River. “A group of Native voices is kicking off Native American Heritage month with a new multimedia story collection that celebrates the Little Colorado River’s life-giving waters. ‘Lifeways of the Little Colorado River’ features personal narratives, videos, and audio stories from Indigenous sheepherders, scholars, farmers, musicians, activists, artists, and more.”

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change

University of Texas at Austin: First Global River Database Documents 40 Years of Change. “The database, created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, uses publicly available remote sensing data to show how the river centerlines of the world’s 48 most threatened deltas have moved during the past 40 years. The data can be used to predict how rivers will continue to move over time and help governments manage population density and future development.”

No paddles needed: Ottawa River now navigable on Google Street View (CBC)

CBC: No paddles needed: Ottawa River now navigable on Google Street View. “You no longer need a boat and a lifejacket to traverse one stretch of the Ottawa River — just a good internet connection. Thanks to the efforts of The Ottawa Riverkeeper, an organization that advocates for the watershed, and Chelsea, Que., photographer Brian Redmond, a scenic stretch of the river that runs past Parliament Hill can now be navigated on Google Street View.”