The Verge: Mike Bloomberg has spent nearly $15 million to be in your Google search results

The Verge: Mike Bloomberg has spent nearly $15 million to be in your Google search results. “According to Google, Bloomberg’s campaign has spent a staggering $14,849,500 on political ads since the candidate announced his run at the end of November; overall, Bloomberg has spent nearly $200 million on his run for president of the United States.”

Slate: Pete Buttigieg’s Campaign Says This Wikipedia User Is Not Pete. So Who Is It?

Slate: Pete Buttigieg’s Campaign Says This Wikipedia User Is Not Pete. So Who Is It?. “Pete Buttigieg, the young, telegenic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, prides himself on being the only millennial currently vying for the presidency, and his path up to this point has been a fairly deliberate one. He was even named ‘Most Likely to be U.S. President’ his senior year of high school. As any young aspiring politician knows, carefully maintaining your image online is key. And no tool in your early-career arsenal is quite as effective as Wikipedia.” I don’t really give a damn if Pete Buttigieg created a Wikipedia page for himself, but there’s some interesting detective work laid out here.

CNET: Twitter flags Trump, Biden, Warren campaigns, citing ad-policy violations

CNET: Twitter flags Trump, Biden, Warren campaigns, citing ad-policy violations. “Twitter flagged the campaign accounts of presidential candidates, including incumbent Donald Trump and rival Joe Biden, as ‘suspended” in the ads database, saying they’d violated the company’s policies. The accounts remain active on the social network, and it’s unclear whether any violations actually occurred. Twitter, which bans political advertising, changed the wording in the database to “ineligible for Twitter Ads” after CNET inquired about the labels on Thursday.”

Poynter: U.S. fact-checkers gear up for 2020 campaign with 50 active platforms

Poynter: U.S. fact-checkers gear up for 2020 campaign with 50 active platforms. “With the U.S. election now less than a year away, at least four dozen American fact-checking projects plan to keep tabs on claims by candidates and their supporters – and a majority of those fact-checkers won’t be focused on the presidential campaign. The 50 active U.S. fact-checking projects are included in the latest Duke Reporters’ Lab tally of global fact-checking, which found 226 sites in 73 countries as of Nov. 25.”

The Washington Post: Opponents of Elizabeth Warren spread a doctored photo on Twitter. Her campaign couldn’t stop its spread.

The Washington Post: Opponents of Elizabeth Warren spread a doctored photo on Twitter. Her campaign couldn’t stop its spread.. “As the image solidified negative views of Warren among some who favor other Democratic candidates, the incident offered a fresh lesson about political disinformation: Homespun operations on social media represent a rising threat, capable of inciting conflict among voters and turning unwitting users into agents of online deception.”

Gizmodo: Billionaire Buys ‘Climate Change’ On Google

Gizmodo: Billionaire Buys ‘Climate Change’ On Google. “Data provided to Gizmodo by an SEO professional who asked to remain anonymous shows that Bloomberg is targeting more than 840 search terms that specifically reference climate with hundreds more that reference climate-adjacent terms.”

Bing Blogs: Bing 2020 US Elections Experience (Beta)

Bing Blogs: Bing 2020 US Elections Experience (Beta). “The 2020 U.S. presidential election is right around the corner and it can be difficult to find information on candidates and issues in one place. You might have to search across various news sources, candidate web sites, government sites or look through a voter’s pamphlet – piecing together information. To provide a single destination for the 2020 U.S. presidential race that helps users find comprehensive information about candidates and issues, we’re sharing our expanded Bing elections experience in Beta.”