University of Virginia: Digital Social Network Linking The Living And The Dead Expands

University of Virginia: Digital Social Network Linking The Living And The Dead Expands. “The Social Networks and Archival Context, or SNAC… aims to blow open the doors of libraries and archives and revolutionize the way primary documents are organized and made accessible. The digital platform addresses the longstanding research challenge of discovering, locating and using historical records stored all over the world. It can show links between the living and the dead, and between individuals, families and organizations, across time and place.”

SF Chronicle: State archives documents put online to be used in classrooms

San Francisco Chronicle: State archives documents put online to be used in classrooms. “Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea says she’s making the primary source documents available in this way for the first time as part of American Archives Month, so educators can use them in their classrooms. The teacher resources section on the Department of State website features an interactive timeline of Rhode Island’s history from 1600 to the present and themed collections of significant archival documents dating back to the 1600s.” This brief story does not provide links to the archival documents, so try looking at http://sos.ri.gov/divisions/Civics-And-Education/teacher-resources . I’m not 100% certain when this launched.

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life. “n a few weeks, the Harvard Library will release a new website for its ongoing, multiyear digitization ‘Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.’ Approximately 450,000 digitized pages of all the known archival and manuscript materials in the Library relating to 17th- and 18th-century North America will be available to the public.”

The Local (SE): Swedish university launches digital archive of Nazi concentration camp survivor testimonies

The Local (SE): Swedish university launches digital archive of Nazi concentration camp survivor testimonies. “A digital archive of over 500 survivors’ testimonies from a Nazi concentration camp will be launched in the southern Swedish city of Lund later this week. The archive includes interviews with women and children who were interned at the Ravensbrück camp in northern Germany, as well as documents belonging to survivors and Nazi officials. “

Library of Congress: Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online

Library of Congress: Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online. “The collection includes general and family correspondence, speeches, reports, messages, military records, financial and legal records, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, memorabilia and other papers. The collection relates to Grant’s service in the Mexican War and Civil War, his pre-Civil War career, and his postwar service as U.S. secretary of war ad interim under President Andrew Johnson, his 1868 presidential campaign and two-term presidency, his unsuccessful 1880 presidential bid, his extensive international travels and the financial difficulties late in life that spurred the writing of his memoir, which he completed just days before his death from tongue cancer in July 1885. “

Georgia Archives Launches New “Colonial Conveyances” Online Collection

New from the Georgia Archives: Colonial Conveyances. From this page: “The Colonial Conveyances are the equivalent of property deeds. They are the recorded property transactions between private citizens in the Colony of Georgia. Colonists who received land grants from the Trustees or the Crown could sell or otherwise convey their land or other property to other private citizens. The conveyances consist primarily of property transfers, usually land purchases. Related documents, such as schedules of personal property and marriage agreements, may be recorded along with the conveyance. … The first volume, 1750 – 1761, contains conveyances and other documents recorded during the period when the colony was governed by the Trustees for Establishing the Colony of Georgia, 1732 – 1752. The State of Georgia did not pass a law requiring that deeds be recorded in the county where the property was located until 1785. Deed books for Georgia’s early counties do not begin until 1785-1786, with the exceptions of Liberty and Glynn Counties. Look for Georgia deeds from 1776 to 1785 in Colonial Conveyances.”

State Archives of NC Starts Blog Series on Interpreting Colonial-Era Handwriting

History for All the People, from the State Archives of North Carolina, is doing a series on how to interpret handwriting. “Since beginning my work with digitizing the General Assembly Session Records collection at the State Archives, I have had to do a bit of research on how to effectively interpret 18th century manuscripts in order create the appropriate metadata for the records and improve discoverability of these records in our digital collection. The following sections include a brief history of writing during this time period, characteristics of 17th and 18th century British-American handwriting, and some tips on deciphering the text found within these records. This is the first blog post of a series on how to read handwritten colonial documents.”