Engadget: Charles Darwin’s full correspondence is now available online

Engadget: Charles Darwin’s full correspondence is now available online. “The University of Cambridge has published all of the evolutionary scientist’s surviving correspondence online, including 400 letters that have either surfaced or are newly ‘reinterpreted.’ The searchable collection now covers over 15,000 letters written between 1822 and 1882, ranging from his influential time aboard the HMS Beagle to On the Origin of Species and end-of-life reflections.”

Mississippi State University: MSU Libraries takes Mississippi Republican Party papers online for first time

Mississippi State University: MSU Libraries takes Mississippi Republican Party papers online for first time. “Historical papers of the Mississippi Republican Party, held by Mississippi State Libraries since 1980, are available online for the first time. A new finding aid—or descriptive guide—now helps researchers in electronically examining and understanding the content of the collection which dates back to 1928.”

Australian War Memorial: First World War diaries and letters get new life online

Australian War Memorial: First World War diaries and letters get new life online. “Eyewitness accounts of the end of the First World War, as recorded in diaries and letters, are now available online as part of a major digitisation project led by the Australian War Memorial. These diaries and letters give an intimate insight to this globally significant day, as Australians gather to mark Remembrance Day and commemorate the Armistice of the First World War, which was signed at 11 am on 11 November 1918.”

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: What I learned about antisemitism from a remarkable new archive about Jewish Civil War soldiers

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: What I learned about antisemitism from a remarkable new archive about Jewish Civil War soldiers . “[Max] Glass was not the only Jewish soldier to be cruelly mistreated when serving in the Union Army. But as the new Shapell Roster of Jewish Service in the Civil War demonstrates, his experience was far from typical. I explored the Shapell Roster while working on my new book, on the experience of Jewish soldiers in the Union army. What I learned from the vast collection of documents and data was that indifference, benign curiosity and comradeship appear to have been much more common than conflict for the majority of Jewish soldiers in the Union army.”

Yorkshire Post: Wentworth Woodhouse’s ‘lost’ archives that were thought to have been destroyed in a fire reveal fascinating facts about Yorkshire estate

Yorkshire Post: Wentworth Woodhouse’s ‘lost’ archives that were thought to have been destroyed in a fire reveal fascinating facts about Yorkshire estate. “The story goes that a huge bonfire at Wentworth Woodhouse in the 1970s destroyed a vast collection of private letters and documents belonging to the aristocratic Fitzwilliam family. Yet this urban legend that sprang up in the estate villages as the family’s fortunes crumbled and the Grade I-listed house near Rotherham’s sale approached was never accurate – and a new research project has digitised the Fitzwilliams’ ‘lost’ archives and revealed previously unknown facts about their lives.”

News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London

News@Northeastern: Letters Of Ignatius Sancho Offer Window To Life Of Black Man In 18th-century London. “Led by Northeastern professors Nicole Aljoe and Olly Ayers along with four undergraduate research assistants, the Ignatius Sancho’s London project pulls data from digital and physical archives of Sancho’s letters and maps them, creating an interactive resource to help the public understand Black life in 18th-century England.”

City College of New York: CCNY’s digital publication of student’s archive from the Spanish Civil War available to educators

City College of New York: CCNY’s digital publication of student’s archive from the Spanish Civil War available to educators . “CCNY Student Wilfred Mendelson on the deck of the S.S. Manhattan on his way to fight in the Spanish Civil War in 1938. A digital publication of a collection of his letters and essays is now available to all educators for free.”

‘Mutilated by rats,’ burned, trashed: 200 years of presidential papers lost (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Mutilated by rats,’ burned, trashed: 200 years of presidential papers lost. “Until the 1970s, former presidents could do pretty much whatever they wanted with their presidential papers. That often was a problem. Some papers ‘were purposely destroyed, while others fell victim to chance destruction,’ concluded a 1978 congressional study. ‘Others have been scattered to the four winds.’”

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. “The prison records, correspondence and artwork of Abu-Jamal, and related materials from advocate Johanna Fernández, will anchor a collection at the John Hay Library focused on first-person accounts of incarceration.”

New-to-me: Northeast Slavery Records Index

New-to-me: the Northeast Slavery Records Index. From the front page: “The Northeast Slavery Records Index (NESRI) is an online searchable compilation of records that identify individual enslaved persons and enslavers in the states of New York, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Jersey. NESRI indexes census records, slave trade transactions, cemetery records, birth certifications, manumissions, ship inventories, newspaper accounts, private narratives, legal documents and many other sources.”

University of Rochester: Slaughter family papers help complete the story of a life in politics

University of Rochester: Slaughter family papers help complete the story of a life in politics. “The letters exchanged between late United States Representative Louise Slaughter and her husband, Bob, are a small portion of the Robert and Louise Slaughter family papers that now reside at the University of Rochester. A gift from the Slaughters’ family, the papers will be held by the Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation (RBSCP), complementing the Louise M. Slaughter congressional papers given to Rochester in 2019.”

‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys (British Library)

British Library: ‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys. “On 19 November 1847, Gregor Grant, Senior Magistrate of Police at Bombay (Mumbai), sent depositions of forty-seven women and girls and twelve boys to the Government of Bombay. These individuals had been on board five baghlahs (sailing vessels) captured in the Persian Gulf in September 1847 by the East India Company’s Indian Navy and brought into Bombay Harbour…. The correspondence concerning the five baghlahs and the people on board can be found in the India Office Records file IOR/L/PS/5/452, which has been digitised and can be accessed through the Qatar Digital Library.”

Brown University: Grant to support Brown-led global oral history project on slavery’s legacy

Brown University: Grant to support Brown-led global oral history project on slavery’s legacy . “With support from the grant, researchers at Brown’s Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice will collaborate with an international network of scholars in Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Belgium, Brazil and beyond to host public conversations, capture video narratives and record oral histories that seek to answer two important questions: How did slavery and colonialism shape these places, and how did they shape the world as a whole?”

The Conversation: Migrant workers are flipping the script and using Photovoice to tell their own stories

The Conversation: Migrant workers are flipping the script and using Photovoice to tell their own stories . “COVID-19 and worries about food security have resulted in increased media coverage about migrant agricultural workers, with stories usually told on their behalf. Four sets of South Asian migrant men in Greece wanted to flip the script and tell their own stories. They used Photovoice, an arts-based social justice tool, to present themselves and their concerns directly to people. This eventually transformed into a travelling multi-media exhibition and a digital archive, This is Evidence.”

Baylor University: Texas Oral History Association, Baylor University Libraries Launch Initiative to Locate, Make Accessible State’s Collections of Oral Memoirs

Baylor University: Texas Oral History Association, Baylor University Libraries Launch Initiative to Locate, Make Accessible State’s Collections of Oral Memoirs. “A new statewide initiative of the Texas Oral History Association (TOHA) and the Baylor University Institute for Oral History (BUIOH) seeks to create a publicly-accessible listing of all known oral history collections in Texas thanks to a new project called the Texas Oral History Locator Database, or TOLD.”