Princeton: Princeton Prosody Archive Launches a Bold New Site

Princeton: Princeton Prosody Archive Launches a Bold New Site. “The thousands of digitized works in the Princeton Prosody Archive are now publicly available on the archive’s new and improved website. The searchable site means centuries’ worth of texts are right at your fingertips.” After I went and looked up prosody, I checked out the Princeton Prosody Archive. It describes itself this way: “Welcome to the Princeton Prosody Archive, a full-text searchable database of thousands of digitized books published between 1570 and 1923. The Archive collects historical documents and highlights discourses about the study of language, the study of poetry, and where and how these intersect and diverge.”

Good news for future tech: Exotic ‘topological’ materials are surprisingly common (Princeton University)

Princeton University: Good news for future tech: Exotic ‘topological’ materials are surprisingly common. “In a major step forward for an area of research that earned the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, an international team has found that substances with exotic electronic behaviors called topological materials are in fact quite common, and include everyday elements such as arsenic and gold. The team created an online catalog to make it easy to design new topological materials using elements from the periodic table.” I went looking for an explanatory guide to topological materials and HA HA HA HA HA HA. But I did find this article from Phys.org has some explanation of topological insulators and materials. It helped my understanding.

Princeton University: Google to open artificial intelligence lab in Princeton and collaborate with University researchers

Princeton University: Google to open artificial intelligence lab in Princeton and collaborate with University researchers. “The work in the lab will focus on a discipline within artificial intelligence known as machine learning, in which computers learn from existing information and develop the ability to draw conclusions and make decisions in new situations that were not in the original data. Examples include speech recognition systems that transcribe a wide spectrum of voices, and self-driving cars that process complex visual cues. In particular, the work will build on recent advances by [Elad] Hazan, [Yoram] Singer and colleagues in optimization methods for machine learning to improve their speed and accuracy while reducing the required computing power.”

Virtual Victorians: Using 21st-century technology to evaluate 19th-century texts (Princeton University)

Princeton University: Virtual Victorians: Using 21st-century technology to evaluate 19th-century texts. “In the 19th century, printing technology changed the way readers experienced texts. Today, students and researchers are using digital technology to access historical literary texts in new ways and finding surprising echoes of the past in their own lives.”

ROI: State unveils Research with NJ database, to help STEM industries, N.J. universities collaborate better

ROI: State unveils Research with NJ database, to help STEM industries, N.J. universities collaborate better. “New Jersey unveiled Research with NJ, a database aimed at boosting collaborations and relationships in STEM fields at five universities, Tuesday at the annual Biotechnology Innovation Organization conference. It will include information from New Jersey Institute of Technology, Princeton University, Rowan University, Rutgers University and Stevens Institute of Technology. The site has 3,500 faculty profiles, 180,000 published works and more than 23,000 media citations. It is the result of a five-year, 5,000-profile contract that cost the state $1.5 million to implement.”

Born Digital: How Social Media and Paperless Offices are Reshaping the University Archives (Princeton Alumni Weekly)

Princeton Alumni Weekly: Born Digital: How Social Media and Paperless Offices are Reshaping the University Archives. “The artifacts of activism at Princeton come in many forms: membership cards for the Veterans of Future Wars, a satirical student group that made national headlines in 1936; audio cassettes from WPRB’s coverage of a campus meeting at Jadwin Gym during the May 1970 strike that followed the U.S. invasion of Cambodia; and scores of photos, mostly black-and-white, from public demonstrations such as the 1978 occupation of Nassau Hall, when students protested University investments in companies doing business in apartheid-era South Africa. During the 2015 Nassau Hall sit-in — the protest that sparked a re-examination of Woodrow Wilson 1879’s legacy and a broader discussion of diversity and inclusion at Princeton — archivists knew they would need to take a different approach, one not dependent on file boxes.”

IoT Inspector: Princeton releases a tool to snoop on home IoT devices and figure out what they’re doing (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: IoT Inspector: Princeton releases a tool to snoop on home IoT devices and figure out what they’re doing. “IoT Inspector is a new tool from Princeton’s computer science department; it snoops on the traffic from home IoT devices and performs analysis to determine who they phone home to, whether they use encryption, and what kinds of data they may be leaking…. The first 50 devices are basically a security/privacy dumpster fire.”