JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection. “The Angolite is one of the most famous prison newspapers in history, having won multiple awards and changed the popular conception of what prison journalism could be. The paper is produced by the people incarcerated at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially known as Angola for the slave plantation that preceded it…. At present, the sprawling prison farm is 28 square miles, 18,000 acres. It is the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, and the state of Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the nation.”

Writing in the margins: The story behind Kingston’s Prison for Women magazine (TVO)

TVO: Writing in the margins: The story behind Kingston’s Prison for Women magazine. “When inmates at Kingston Penitentiary decided in 1950 to start the KP Telescope, their very own newspaper, they already had a printing press and resources to start producing it. But when inmates across the street at the Prison for Women created their own publication, called Tightwire, in 1970, it was a different story…. For the past 10 years, Melissa Munn, a professor at Okanagan College, in British Columbia, has been building a digital collection of penal-press issues at Penal Press — A History of Prison Within. It now features more than 1,500 PDF copies of issues from institutions across North America, including 31 issues of Tightwire.”

New-to-Me: Washington Prison History Project

I’m not sure how new this is but it’s new-to-me: the Washington Prison History Project. From the front page: “Welcome to the Washington Prison History Project, an online project documenting the history of prisoner activism and policy in our state. The site features a robust collection of prisoner-produced newspapers from the late 20th century; oral histories and testimonials about the Washington state prison system; research on local histories of punishment; and a text-adventure computer game designed inside a maximum security prison.”