Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT

Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT. “The last time Rochell Crowder held an office job, he said, it was 1983 and computers were not yet central to everyday life. But on Thursday, after almost four decades of odd jobs and crimes that landed him in and out of jail, the 57-year-old completed a computer science course taught by PhD candidates from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. “The prison records, correspondence and artwork of Abu-Jamal, and related materials from advocate Johanna Fernández, will anchor a collection at the John Hay Library focused on first-person accounts of incarceration.”

Berkeley News: Overcrowding, old buildings fueled COVID in California prisons, says new report

Berkeley News: Overcrowding, old buildings fueled COVID in California prisons, says new report. “Overcrowding, sometimes in antiquated buildings, compounded by rapidly changing conditions and the need for complex coordination, helped to drive a dramatic surge in COVID-19 in California’s prisons, according to a new report from the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley.”

Johns Hopkins University: American Prison Writing Archive Moves To Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins University: American Prison Writing Archive Moves To Johns Hopkins. “With the move, principal investigator Vesla Weaver, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of political science and sociology at the Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and Doran Larson, the archive’s founder and Edward North Professor of Literature at Hamilton College, plan for the new collective to aggregate 10,000 pieces of first-person witness, making it the largest digital archive of writings by incarcerated people in the world.”

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection. “The Angolite is one of the most famous prison newspapers in history, having won multiple awards and changed the popular conception of what prison journalism could be. The paper is produced by the people incarcerated at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially known as Angola for the slave plantation that preceded it…. At present, the sprawling prison farm is 28 square miles, 18,000 acres. It is the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, and the state of Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the nation.”

Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System

Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System. “The U.S. Bureau of Prisons purchased a number of Facebook ads recently in an attempt to hire new people in a variety of roles throughout the country. But one ad in particular is catching attention on social media for how bleak it seems. The Bureau of Prisons seems to be using the number of mental illnesses in the U.S. prison system as a career opportunity for any psychologists who happen to be job hunting right now.”

Bureau of Justice Statistics: Now available—the new, modern Corrections Statistical Analysis Tool (CSAT) with prisoners data

Bureau of Justice Statistics: Now available—the new, modern Corrections Statistical Analysis Tool (CSAT) with prisoners data. “For the first time, the dashboard combines data from the National Corrections Reporting Program and National Prisoner Statistics program. This dashboard provides data users central access to more comprehensive, in-depth, state-level data on persons in state prison, including data by age, sex, race or ethnicity, offense, sentence length, time served in prison, and type of admission and release.”

Korea Future: Launching the North Korean Prison Database

Korea Future: Launching the North Korean Prison Database. “Today we launch the North Korean Prison Database — a growing and comprehensive archive of international human rights law violations and atrocities that have transpired in the North Korean Penal system. The database preserves and manages evidence gathered through detailed investigations by Korea Future. To date, we have identified 597 perpetrators linked to 5,181 human rights violations committed against 784 detainees in 148 penal facilities.”

Business Insider: Federal prison working conditions are getting worse despite Biden’s promise to improve conditions, staffers say

Business Insider: Federal prison working conditions are getting worse despite Biden’s promise to improve conditions, staffers say. “President Joe Biden pledged to overhaul the criminal justice system and improve conditions within federal prisons. But more than a year since he took office, some federal prison workers tell Insider their working conditions at federal prison facilities have worsened as the COVID-19 pandemic persists.”

Queer and Trans Prison Voices: A Podcast Archive on Prison Abolition (City University of New York)

City University of New York: Queer and Trans Prison Voices: A Podcast Archive on Prison Abolition. “By integrating that sonic archive into the podcast medium, this project functions as a digital archive for incarcerated voices, consisting of two tracks: a collection of short-spoken readings by queer and transgender incarcerated authors, and podcast-style interviews with activist scholars, organizations, and sound artists working towards prison abolition.” This is a CUNY “Capstone Project”; what the archive lacks in size it makes up in academic discussion.

HuffPost: Leonard Peltier Pleads For Help Amid Constant COVID Lockdowns In Prison

HuffPost: Leonard Peltier Pleads For Help Amid Constant COVID Lockdowns In Prison. “Leonard Peltier, the Native American rights activist whom the FBI put behind bars decades ago without any evidence that he committed a crime, tells HuffPost that his facility’s prolonged COVID-19 lockdowns and failure to provide at least some inmates with booster shots has left him ― and likely others ― unbearably isolated and preparing for death. ‘I’m in hell,’ Peltier said in a Friday statement, ‘and there is no way to deal with it but to take it as long as you can.’”

New York Times: Detainees Sue Arkansas Jail That Gave Them Ivermectin to Treat Covid

New York Times: Detainees Sue Arkansas Jail That Gave Them Ivermectin to Treat Covid. “Detainees at an Arkansas jail who had Covid-19 were unknowingly treated by the detention center’s doctor with ivermectin, a drug that health officials have continually said is dangerous and should not be used to treat or prevent a coronavirus infection, according to a federal lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of four detainees.”

KPIX: San Francisco Library Receives $2M To Expand Services For Incarcerated

KPIX: San Francisco Library Receives $2M To Expand Services For Incarcerated. “The San Francisco Public Library received a $2 million grant to expand services for people incarcerated locally and nationally from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation last week. The grant will support a collaboration between the library and the American Library Association, according to a news release shared Thursday by the office of San Francisco Mayor London Breed.”

WRIC: Virginia Department of Corrections suspends in-person visits through Jan. 28 due to COVID-19 cases

WRIC: Virginia Department of Corrections suspends in-person visits through Jan. 28 due to COVID-19 cases. “The Virginia Department of Corrections has temporarily suspended in-person visits at all facilities through Jan. 28 due to an uptick in COVID-19 cases. Video visitation will remain in place for most facilities, but Red Onion State Prison has canceled video visits for Housing Unit B-6 and the Virginia Correctional Center for Women has suspended them for the Red and Yellow zones. It’s unclear when video visits will reopen for those specific locations.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah prison, jail facilities report COVID-19 outbreaks

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah prison, jail facilities report COVID-19 outbreaks. “As Utah continues to report record-high coronavirus case counts, cases also are spiking in the state’s prisons and jails. The Davis County Jail is experiencing a new outbreak after the facility had been COVID-free for nine months. As of last week, 24 individuals had tested positive, and a dozen other inmates were being monitored for exposure. On Monday, the number of confirmed cases had jumped to 35, according to a spokesperson.”