NBC News: T-Mobile CEO apologizes after hacker stole millions of users’ personal information

NBC News: T-Mobile CEO apologizes after hacker stole millions of users’ personal information. “T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert published an open apology to customers Friday after hackers stole more than 50 million users’ personal data, including their Social Security numbers and driver’s license information.” As the article points out, T-Mobile has an extensive history of security issues.

Business Insider: T-Mobile customers file class action lawsuits as investigation finds 53 million affected by data breach

Business Insider: T-Mobile customers file class action lawsuits as investigation finds 53 million affected by data breach. “The number of users whose personal information might have been compromised in a recent cyber attack of T-Mobile has climbed to 53 million, as the telecommunication company is hit by a pair of class-action lawsuits. T-Mobile announced Friday it had discovered that another 5.3 million current customers and 667,000 former customers also had their information stolen.”

Engadget: T-Mobile confirms data breach affects over 47 million people

Engadget: T-Mobile confirms data breach affects over 47 million people. “As part of its ongoing data breach investigation, T-Mobile has confirmed the enormity of the stolen information. Roughly 47.8 million current and former or prospective customers have been affected by the cyberattack on its systems, the carrier confirmed on Wednesday. Of that number, about 7.8 million are current T-Mobile postpaid accounts and the rest are prior or potential users who had applied for credit, the company added in a press release.”

Motherboard: T-Mobile Investigating Claims of Massive Customer Data Breach

Motherboard: T-Mobile Investigating Claims of Massive Customer Data Breach. “T-Mobile says it is investigating a forum post claiming to be selling a mountain of personal data. The forum post itself doesn’t mention T-Mobile, but the seller told Motherboard they have obtained data related to over 100 million people, and that the data came from T-Mobile servers. The data includes social security numbers, phone numbers, names, physical addresses, unique IMEI numbers, and driver licenses information, the seller said.”

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data. “You might not have to worry quite so much about carriers selling your phone location data to less-than-diligent third parties. AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon (Engadget’s parent company) have provided responses to FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel’s request for an update on the practice, with all four saying they’d halted sales to aggregators sometime after promising to do so back in June 2018. “

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales. “The four major US wireless carriers are facing proposed class-action lawsuits accusing them of violating federal law by selling their customers’ real-time location data to third parties. The complaints seeking class action status and financial damages were filed last week against AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint in US District Court for the District of Maryland.”

Motherboard: Hundreds of Bounty Hunters Had Access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint Customer Location Data for Years

Motherboard: Hundreds of Bounty Hunters Had Access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint Customer Location Data for Years. “Around 250 bounty hunters and related businesses had access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint customer location data, with one bail bond firm using the phone location service more than 18,000 times, and others using it thousands or tens of thousands of times, according to internal documents obtained by Motherboard from a company called CerCareOne, a now-defunct location data seller that operated until 2017. The documents list not only the companies that had access to the data, but specific phone numbers that were pinged by those companies.”

The Register: AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, T-Mobile US pledge, again, to not sell your location to shady geezers. Sorry, we don’t believe them

The Register: AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, T-Mobile US pledge, again, to not sell your location to shady geezers. Sorry, we don’t believe them. “US cellphone networks have promised – again – that they will stop selling records of their subscribers’ whereabouts to anyone willing to cough up cash.” I don’t believe them either.

Engadget: Hackers gain access to millions of T-Mobile customer details

Engadget: Hackers gain access to millions of T-Mobile customer details. “T-Mobile has fallen foul of yet another cybersecurity issue. In a statement released this week the company said that an unauthorized entry into its network may have given hackers access to customer records, including billing ZIP codes, phone numbers, email addresses and account numbers. According to T-Mobile, the intrusion was quickly shut down, and no financial data, social security numbers or passwords were compromised.”