The Verge: Congress just cleared the way for internet providers to sell your web browsing history

The Verge: Congress just cleared the way for internet providers to sell your web browsing history. “Internet providers now just need a signature from President Trump before they’re free to take, share, and even sell your web browsing history without your permission. The House of Representatives passed a resolution today overturning an Obama-era FCC rule that required internet providers to get customers’ permission before sharing their browsing history with other companies. The rules also required internet providers to protect that data from hackers and inform customers of any breaches.”

PCWorld: How to keep a private stash of bookmarks in Chrome

PCWorld: How to keep a private stash of bookmarks in Chrome. “Incognito Mode in Chrome can keep your browsing history secret unless you have a nosy Internet Service Provider, and you’re not using a VPN. But one thing incognito doesn’t keep secret are any bookmarks you’ve got. If you’ve ever wanted to keep a private collection of bookmarks the Chrome extension Hush is one solution.”

South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election

South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election. “In what could be one of Hong Kong’s most significant data breaches ever, the personal information of the city’s 3.7 million voters was possibly compromised after the Registration and Electoral Office reported two laptop computers went missing at its backup venue for the chief executive election.”

Protecting web users’ privacy: System for disguising database queries could prevent customer profiling and price gouging. (MIT News)

MIT News: Protecting web users’ privacy: System for disguising database queries could prevent customer profiling and price gouging.. “Most website visits these days entail a database query — to look up airline flights, for example, or to find the fastest driving route between two addresses. But online database queries can reveal a surprising amount of information about the people making them. And some travel sites have been known to jack up the prices on flights whose routes are drawing an unusually high volume of queries.”

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you. “It’s on. Recently, the United States Senate saw fit to allow Internet Service Providers to sell your web browsing history and other data to third parties. The action has yet to pass the House, but if it does, it means anyone concerned about privacy will have to protect themselves against over zealous data collection from their ISP. Some privacy-conscious folks are already doing that—but many aren’t.”

MakeUseOf: Secure Your Facebook With These 6 Simple Tricks

MakeUseOf: Secure Your Facebook With These 6 Simple Tricks. “Facebook’s ubiquity makes it dangerous in so many ways. Aside from the threat of picking up malware, the ever-present risk of someone hacking your account — plus privacy issues from Facebook itself — mean you must be vigilant when using the service. Thankfully, it only takes a few moments to make sure you’re not at risk for Facebook issues. Here are six easy ways to avoid becoming a victim on Facebook.”

Maine: America’s JobLink (AJL) Data Incident

From Maine.gov: America’s JobLink (AJL) Data Incident
. “America’s JobLink (AJL), a multi-state web-based system that links job seekers with employers, has been the victim of a hacking incident from an outside source…. On March 21st, AJLA–TS confirmed that a malicious third party ‘hacker’ exploited a vulnerability in the AJL application code to view the names, Social Security Numbers, and dates of birth of job seekers in the AJL systems of up to ten states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Oklahoma, and Vermont.”