ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades

ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades. “In releasing the information included in our database, ProPublica is not publishing all complaints against officers. As we’ve noted, we’ve limited the data to only those officers who’ve had at least one substantiated allegation. And every complaint in the database was fully investigated by the CCRB, which means, among other steps, a civilian provided a sworn statement to investigators. We’ve also excluded any allegations that investigators concluded were unfounded, meaning investigators determined the incident did not happen as the complainant alleged. There were about 3,200 allegations listed as unfounded in the data we were provided, about 9% of the total.”

ProPublica: Did Your Job Give You Masks or Other Protective Gear? Send Us a Picture.

ProPublica: Did Your Job Give You Masks or Other Protective Gear? Send Us a Picture.. “We’d like to see pictures of the personal protective equipment that government agencies have issued to their workers. In particular, we’re interested in the types of face masks and respirators that workers have received (respirators are commonly known as N95 masks, or if certified to Chinese standards, KN95 masks).”

ProPublica: We Want to Talk to People Working or Living on the Front Lines of Coronavirus. Help Us Report.

ProPublica: We Want to Talk to People Working or Living on the Front Lines of Coronavirus. Help Us Report.. “ProPublica has put together a reporting team to investigate the government’s response to the new coronavirus, which is officially known as COVID-19. Are you a public health worker or front line medical provider? Do you work for or with a government agency that’s involved in the effort to protect the public? Have you or your family personally been affected? Show us what we should be covering, or serve as an expert to make sure we’re on track.”

ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.

ProPublica: We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.. “We published a database in January of Catholic clergy who have been deemed ‘credibly accused’ of sexual abuse or misconduct by nearly 180 dioceses and religious orders around the country. Since then, hundreds of thousands of people have searched the database. A number of those people have reached out with questions about the project. Many have shared personal stories as survivors of abuse. And although the officially released lists total more than 5,800 unique names, dozens of people have written in to suggest names of clergy who they believe have been left off. We’re glad to hear from readers, and we wanted to provide answers to several of the most common questions we’ve received.”

ProPublica: How People Are Using Our Chicago Parking Ticket Data in Their Research

ProPublica: How People Are Using Our Chicago Parking Ticket Data in Their Research. “A few of them pointed me to aspects of the data that we had not addressed in our coverage. Kevin Lobo, a management consultant, explained how he analyzed the behavior of the Chicago police officers who wrote the most tickets. Wesley Skogan, a professor emeritus at Northwestern University’s Institute for Policy Research, mused about the placement of parking meters throughout the city. Lots of people showed me their charts. The work I saw was rigorous, creative and heartening for the practice of sharing journalistic resources with the public at no cost.”

Making Collaborative Data Projects Easier: Our New Tool, Collaborate, Is Here (ProPublica)

ProPublica: Making Collaborative Data Projects Easier: Our New Tool, Collaborate, Is Here. “Collaborations are a major part of ProPublica’s approach to journalism, and in the past few years we’ve run several large-scale collaborative projects, including Electionland and Documenting Hate. Along the way, we’ve created software to manage and share the large pools of data used by our hundreds of newsrooms partners. As part of a Google News Initiative grant this year, we’ve beefed up that software and made it open source so that anybody can use it.”

ProPublica: Want to Start a Collaborative Journalism Project? We’re Building Tools to Help.

ProPublica: Want to Start a Collaborative Journalism Project? We’re Building Tools to Help.. “Today we’re announcing new tools, documentation and training to help news organizations collaborate on data journalism projects. Newsrooms, long known for being cutthroat competitors, have been increasingly open to the idea of working with one another, especially on complex investigative stories. But even as interest in collaboration grows, many journalists don’t know where to begin or how to run a sane, productive partnership. And there aren’t many good tools available to help them work together. That’s where our project comes in.”

Sojourners: New Database Lets You Search Racial Disparities in School Districts

Sojourners: New Database Lets You Search Racial Disparities in School Districts. “ProPublica has released a new interactive database that allows users to examine racial disparities in more than 96,000 individual public and charter schools, and 17,000 districts across the United States.”

New York Times: News Site to Investigate Big Tech, Helped by Craigslist Founder

New York Times: News Site to Investigate Big Tech, Helped by Craigslist Founder. “The Markup, dedicated to investigating technology and its effect on society, will be led by two former ProPublica journalists. Craig Newmark gave $20 million to help fund the operation.” I am not a big fan of Craig Newmark, but I think this is a worthy project.

ProPublica: Get an Inside Look at the Department of Defense’s Struggle to Fix Pollution at More Than 39,000 Sites

ProPublica: Get an Inside Look at the Department of Defense’s Struggle to Fix Pollution at More Than 39,000 Sites. “For nearly 45 years, the Pentagon kept its program — the Defense Environmental Restoration Program — out of the spotlight, and most of these sites have never been scrutinized by the public. However, the agency has meticulously tracked its own efforts, recording them in a detailed internal database. We were the first to see it, ever. Now we’re sharing it with you.”

ProPublica: How You Can Keep Track of the Money Political Committees Spend at Trump Properties

ProPublica: How You Can Keep Track of the Money Political Committees Spend at Trump Properties. “In our FEC Itemizer database, we’ve started tracking details on which committees spend money at Trump-owned properties and how much they spend. The data comes from expenditure reports submitted to the Federal Election Commission by the committees. The data will be updated monthly, and more often when, closer to the election, multiple filing days occur in a month.”

New in Nonprofit Explorer: People Search (ProPublica)

ProPublica: New in Nonprofit Explorer: People Search. “Today we’re launching a new feature in our Nonprofit Explorer database. You can now search for board members and key employees who work at nonprofit organizations by name. The database includes everyone listed on nonprofit tax returns filed electronically between 2014 and 2017. The data includes each person’s reported title and base compensation.”

ProPublica: Governors and Federal Agencies Are Blocking Nearly 1,300 Accounts on Facebook and Twitter

ProPublica: Governors and Federal Agencies Are Blocking Nearly 1,300 Accounts on Facebook and Twitter. “Amanda Farber still doesn’t know why Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan blocked her from his Facebook group. A resident of Bethesda and full-time parent and volunteer, Farber identifies as a Democrat but voted for the Republican Hogan in 2014. Farber says she doesn’t post on her representatives’ pages often. But earlier this year, she said she wrote on the governor’s Facebook page, asking him to oppose the Trump administration’s travel ban and health care proposal. She never received a response. When she later returned to the page, she noticed her comment had been deleted. She also noticed she had been blocked from commenting. (She is still allowed to share the governor’s posts and messages.)”

TechCrunch: Facebook will temporarily disable a tool that lets advertisers exclude people of color

TechCrunch: Facebook will temporarily disable a tool that lets advertisers exclude people of color. “Facebook has been under fire for its practices and policies that enable advertisers to exclude ‘multicultural affinity’ groups from the audiences they reach via the social network. Now, in light of a ProPublica investigation and pressure from the Congressional Black Caucus, Facebook says it’s committed to taking a closer look at its advertising policies, its COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote in a letter to CBC Chairperson Cedric Richmond.”