Covid-19: Hundreds protest against localised Madrid lockdowns (BBC)

BBC: Covid-19: Hundreds protest against localised Madrid lockdowns. “Hundreds of residents in some poorer areas of the Spanish capital Madrid have protested against what they call discrimination ahead of new lockdown measures to stem a rise in Covid-19. The curbs on movement and gatherings start on Monday and affect 850,000 people, many in areas of lower income and with higher immigrant populations.”

CNN: Germany’s virus response won plaudits. But protests over vaccines and masks show it’s a victim of its own success

CNN: Germany’s virus response won plaudits. But protests over vaccines and masks show it’s a victim of its own success. “Germany has been lauded for its pandemic response, thanks to widescale testing and its fast response to the outbreak which has helped keep its Covid-19 mortality rate low — despite a high number of reported cases. Yet the events at the Reichstag have worried experts that the country has become a victim of its own success, allowing for the spread of coronavirus scepticism.”

Pew: Americans think social media can help build movements, but can also be a distraction

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Americans think social media can help build movements, but can also be a distraction. “Social media platforms are important for political and social activists. But while most Americans believe these platforms are an effective tool for raising awareness and creating sustained movements, majorities also believe they are a distraction and lull people into believing they are making a difference when they’re not, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.”

Coronavirus: Arrests at Australia anti-lockdown protests (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Arrests at Australia anti-lockdown protests. “Australian police have made dozens of arrests amid anti-lockdown protests attended by hundreds nationwide. In Melbourne, the centre of Australia’s outbreak, about 300 people marched in defiance of tough measures that have been in place for a month. Smaller protests took place in Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth.”

Library of Congress: The March on Washington in Color

Library of Congress / Unsplash Guest Post: The March on Washington in Color. “[August 28] marks the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington—when a quarter-million people came together to draw attention to the continued challenges and inequalities faced by Black Americans. The two dozen or so color photographs from that day and its leaders are locked down under expensive licenses, inaccessible to the general public, limiting the usage and awareness of one of the most defining moments in American history. Today, we fix this. With the help of the team at the Library and visual historian Jordan Lloyd, we’ve assembled a set of images with no known restrictions from the March, its leaders and segregated America.”

Uncut and unedited: Livestreamers have become a key cog in the Louisville protests (USA Today)

USA Today: Uncut and unedited: Livestreamers have become a key cog in the Louisville protests. “Just before 7 p.m. May 28, Louisville entertainer Montez Jones was in a car on the way to an impromptu protest in the name of Breonna Taylor. He opened his Facebook page and hit ‘go live.’ Within hours, hundreds of people had joined him downtown – the crowd growing as word spread through texts, calls and shares of his livestream. Fast-forward three months, and the protests have continued, with people young and old calling for justice for the unarmed Black woman killed in March at the hands of police.”

Germany coronavirus: ‘Anti-corona’ protests in Berlin draws thousands (BBC)

BBC: Germany coronavirus: ‘Anti-corona’ protests in Berlin draws thousands. “Some 38,000 people took part in a march that split into two main groups. Police ordered one group near the Unter den Linden to disperse for flouting safety rules, then arrested 200 after rocks and bottles were thrown. A second group of about 30,000 met peacefully west of the Brandenburg gate to hear speeches from, among others, the nephew of President John F Kennedy.”

‘Telegram revolution’: How a social media app helped drive protests in Belarus post presidential polls (New Indian Express)

New Indian Express: ‘Telegram revolution’: How a social media app helped drive protests in Belarus post presidential polls. “Every day, like clockwork, to-do lists for those protesting against Belarus’ authoritarian leader appear in the popular Telegram messaging app. They lay out goals, give times and locations of rallies with business-like precision, and offer spirited encouragement.”

Meduza: Anonymous IT specialists launch database of people arrested during opposition protests in Belarus

Meduza: Anonymous IT specialists launch database of people arrested during opposition protests in Belarus. “According to the website’s creators, as of August 18, the database had collected information on 5,000 people arrested during the rallies from August 10–16. The website relies on data from volunteers, the Belarusian Prosecutor’s Office, and the news site Tut.by, as well as information ‘from lists created on Telegram channels.'”

New York Times: Why Protest Tactics Spread Like Memes

New York Times: Why Protest Tactics Spread Like Memes. “A video frame captured in Hong Kong in August 2019 shows a group of pro-democracy protesters, smoke pluming toward them, racing to place an orange traffic cone over a tear-gas canister. A video taken nine months later and 7,000 miles away, at a Black Lives Matter protest in Minneapolis, shows another small group using the same maneuver. Two moments, two continents, two cone placers, their postures nearly identical.”

Hong Kong Protest Movement Data Archive: Poster Search Engine (Hong Kong Free Press)

Found at the Hong Kong Free Press: Hong Kong Protest Movement Data Archive: Poster Search Engine. From the “Methodology and sourcing” section: “The Poster Search Engine allows for text inside the movement posters to be searchable. In total, 23,366 posters have been collected from two major movement publicity Telegram channels: 777文宣傳播稿件大合集 and 反送中文宣谷 covering the movement up until January 23, 2020 and January 18, 2020 respectively. The text inside the posters was OCR-extracted by Google Docs, tokenised, and indexed. OCR errors were manually corrected by a team of Cantonese-speaking human editors who understand the context.”

Phys .org: A decade after the Occupy movement, a new digital archive chronicles its history—and continuing influence

Phys .org: A decade after the Occupy movement, a new digital archive chronicles its history—and continuing influence. “Funded by the Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship in the Kelvin Smith Library at Case Western Reserve—and led by a scholar of the Occupy Movement—the Occupy Archive preserves more than 1,200 pages of documentation and offers access to more than 400 digitized materials that help bring to life the movement’s massive scale, grassroots flavor and enduring impact.”

Coronavirus: Thousands protest in Germany against restrictions (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Thousands protest in Germany against restrictions. “Thousands of people in the German capital Berlin are taking part in a protest against the country’s coronavirus restrictions. The demonstrators say the measures, including the wearing of facemasks, violate their rights and freedoms. Germany has been less badly affected by the pandemic than some European countries, but cases are starting to rise again.”

The Syllabus: UNCG’s new Black Lives Matter protests archive (Winston-Salem Journal)

Winston-Salem Journal: The Syllabus: UNCG’s new Black Lives Matter protests archive. “The latest addition to UNCG’s collections is an archive of materials from area Black Lives Matter protests. The university is now seeking photos, videos, flyers, posters, protest signs, clothing and anything else from the beginning of the BLM movement in 2013 or from the recent local protests over the death of George Floyd. These items will be part of the library’s new Triad Black Lives Matter Protest Collection.”

The Next Web: This AI uses emoji to protect BLM protestors from facial recognition

The Next Web: This AI uses emoji to protect BLM protestors from facial recognition. “If you’ve attended any of the recent Black Lives Matter protests, there’s a good chance you’ve been caught on camera. And if your image has been shared on social media, it could end up in a facial recognition database used by police…. These concerns led Stanford Machine Learning researchers to develop a new anonymization tool: the BLMPrivacyBot.”