Library of Congress: Library Opens New Web Archive Collection, Features Programs for Black History Month

Library of Congress: Library Opens New Web Archive Collection, Features Programs for Black History Month. “A new web archive collection from the Library of Congress documents the civil unrest sparked by the police murder of George Floyd on May 25, 2020. The Protests Against Racism Web Archive contains a selection of websites documenting protests against racism and police brutality against Black people, as well as grass roots movements and activism calling for police reform.”

PA Media: Trump baby blimp inflated again to establish ‘how best to preserve it’

PA Media: Trump baby blimp inflated again to establish ‘how best to preserve it’. “The return of the Donald Trump baby blimp, the huge inflatable depicting the former US president in a nappy and clutching a mobile phone, has begun with a test inflation by the Museum of London. A conservation analysis of the blimp has led staff at the museum, its ‘final resting place’ after it took to the skies above Parliament Square during protests over Mr Trump’s state visit to the UK in June 2019, to blow the balloon up once again.”

WMUK: The Western Activist, a 1960s-era student newspaper published at WMU, is now online

WMUK: The Western Activist, a 1960s-era student newspaper published at WMU, is now online. “In the 1960s, students at Western Michigan University published an anti-war, countercultural newspaper. Now the Western Activist, as it was known, has been digitized. The paper covered the Black Panther movement and protests against the Vietnam War among many other topics.”

Utah State University: USU Folklore Announces Digital Trend of the Year

Utah State University: USU Folklore Announces Digital Trend of the Year. “Utah State University’s Digital Folklore Project has named the hashtag #MahsaAmini, which launched a significant grassroots protest of the Iranian government’s treatment of women, the #DigitalLoreoftheYear for 2022.”

Defector Media: When Adults Banned Their Books, These Teens Fought Back By Organizing

Defector Media: When Adults Banned Their Books, These Teens Fought Back By Organizing. “Meghana Nakkanti really loved the book Homegoing. The 18-year-old high school student in Nixa, Mo., loved how author Yaa Gyasi’s work of historical fiction, following the descendants of one Ghanaian woman across multiple families and two centuries in both Ghana and the United States, delved into intergenerational trauma. But Homegoing was also one of more than a dozen books that parents at Nakkanti’s school wanted to ban. She found this not just odd, but also extremely disconcerting. So, she and her fellow students mobilized.”

The Conversation: How Gen Z is using social media in Iran’s Women, Life, Freedom movement

The Conversation: How Gen Z is using social media in Iran’s Women, Life, Freedom movement. “In the first three months of the protests, demonstrations have taken place in almost all of Iran’s 31 provinces. People in 160 cities and 143 universities have taken part in demonstrations against the mandatory hijab laws. Many Iranians living abroad have also taken part in protests. These protests are part of a long history of women’s rights movements in Iran. But what makes this movement different is how young women are tapping into social media to elevate their own agency and challenge the country’s patriarchal laws.”

WIRED: How Chinese Netizens Swamped China’s Internet Controls

WIRED: How Chinese Netizens Swamped China’s Internet Controls. “The country’s government has tried to strike a balance between embracing technology and limiting citizens’ power to use it to protest or organize, building up wide-ranging powers of censorship and surveillance. But last weekend, the momentum of China’s digital savvy population and their frustration, bravery, and anger seemed to break free of the government’s control.”

University of Southern California: What makes a movement go viral? Social media, social justice coalesce under #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd

University of Southern California: What makes a movement go viral? Social media, social justice coalesce under #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd. “The study, published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, demonstrates how images and videos on social media amplify conversations around civil rights and shape large-scale movements like the Black Lives Matter marches and demonstrations that occurred after police killed George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020.”

WIRED: Iran’s Protests Reveal What’s Lost If Twitter Crumbles

WIRED: Iran’s Protests Reveal What’s Lost If Twitter Crumbles. “Twitter—and social media in general—has been awash in videos appearing to show protesters being attacked by police forces, the bodies of those killed, and people’s injuries. For more than a decade, the social network, now owned by Elon Musk, has been used as a way to document protests and human rights abuses around the world. However, as Musk’s chaotic takeover unravels and key safety teams have been cut, the Iranian protests put fresh light on Twitter’s importance as a platform for information sharing and chronicling events globally.”

Iran International: Google Maps Gives Tehran Streets Pre-Revolution Names

Iran International: Google Maps Gives Tehran Streets Pre-Revolution Names. “Although individual users cannot change city, town, village and street names on the maps, names can be altered using Google’s feedback feature of the maps if a large group of users report the names are wrong and suggest alternative. Google maps may have become a new battleground where the opposition demanding regime change and the authorities and their supporters fight over street and even city names.”

CNN: China to punish internet users for ‘liking’ posts in crackdown after zero-Covid protests

CNN: China to punish internet users for ‘liking’ posts in crackdown after zero-Covid protests. “Internet users in China will soon be held liable for liking posts deemed illegal or harmful, sparking fears that the world’s second largest economy plans to control social media like never before.”

Washington Post: Twitter grapples with Chinese spam obscuring news of protests

Washington Post: Twitter grapples with Chinese spam obscuring news of protests. “Twitter’s radically reduced anti-propaganda team grappled on Sunday with a flood of nuisance content in China that researchers said was aimed at reducing the flow of news about stunning widespread protests against coronavirus restrictions.”

Washington Post: With U.S. nudges, Google and others aim to help Iranian protesters

Washington Post: With U.S. nudges, Google and others aim to help Iranian protesters. “… the White House has relaxed sanctions and made it clear to other tech companies that they want them to serve those in Iran that are not connected to the government.”

Washington Post: A White House fence’s Black Lives Matter art has been saved for history

Washington Post: A White House fence’s Black Lives Matter art has been saved for history. “The new online archive is the most comprehensive look yet at the ways the Black Lives Matter Memorial Fence became an art gallery of resistance, representing the outpouring of grief and anger among thousands of people in D.C. protesting racism and police brutality.”

Bleeping Computer: Signal calls on users to run proxies for bypassing Iran blocks

Bleeping Computer: Signal calls on users to run proxies for bypassing Iran blocks. “Signal is urging its global community to help people in Iran stay connected with each other and the rest of the world by volunteering proxies to bypass the aggressive restrictions imposed by the Iranian regime. The end-to-end encrypted messaging tool is currently blocked in Iran, along with WhatsApp and Instagram, which many people in the country use to coordinate protests and share information with the rest of the world.”