The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research

The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research. “Memories are often considered very personal and private. Yet, in the past few years, people have got used to notifications from social media or phone galleries telling them they have a ‘memory’. These repackaged versions of the past affect not just what we remember but also the attachments we have with those memories. In a new study, we found social media has the potential to change how people feel about their memories.”

Newswise: Health ads in users’ customized online sites may evoke negative reactions

Newswise: Health ads in users’ customized online sites may evoke negative reactions. “In a study, the researchers found that people who gained a feeling of control when they customized an online website were more likely to perceive the health message as a threat to their freedom, lowering the chance that they will adopt the message’s advice. On the other hand, when customization bolstered the users’ sense of identity, they did not resent the message as much and were more willing to consider the ads’ recommended behavioral changes, according to the researchers.”

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds. “People with a heightened sense of entitlement are more likely to believe that measures intended to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are unfair, which in turn is associated with reduced compliance with such measures, according to new research from China. The findings are set to appear in the scientific journal Personality and Individual Differences.”

PsyPost: Intellectually arrogant people are less willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, study finds

PsyPost: Intellectually arrogant people are less willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, study finds. “Those who are hostile to revising their beliefs in the face of new information are more likely to hold anti-vaccination sentiments and are less willing to be vaccinated for COVID-19, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. The findings provide more evidence of a link between intellectual humility and vaccination attitudes.”

PsyPost: New “COVIDiot” study explores the impact of using an aggressive style to convey public health messages

PsyPost: New “COVIDiot” study explores the impact of using an aggressive style to convey public health messages. “New research indicates that aggressive messages from science communicators can amplify the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic and increase compliance with measures intended to prevent the spread of the deadly virus. But the study, which appears in Public Understanding of Science, also suggests that such messages can backfire among those who feel psychologically distant from the communicator.”

PsyPost: Dark personality traits predict cognitive and emotional responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, study finds

PsyPost: Dark personality traits predict cognitive and emotional responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, study finds. “New research sheds light on how those with high levels of narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and sadism have reacted cognitively and emotionally to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in Personality and Individual Differences, indicates that narcissists and Machiavellians appear to have experienced greater distress from the coronavirus outbreak. Sadists, however, have found enjoyment in it.”

EurekAlert: Social media use driven by search for reward, akin to animals seeking food

EurekAlert: Social media use driven by search for reward, akin to animals seeking food. “In 2020, more than four billion people spent several hours per day, on average, on platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and other more specialized forums. This widespread social media engagement has been likened by many to an addiction, in which people are driven to pursue positive online social feedback, such as ‘likes,’ over direct social interaction and even basic needs like eating and drinking. While social media usage has been studied extensively, what actually drives people to engage, sometimes obsessively, with others on social media is less clear.”

ScienceBlog: Narcissists Love Being Pandemic Essential Workers

ScienceBlog: Narcissists Love Being Pandemic Essential Workers. “In a new study, researchers found that essential workers (including those in restaurants, grocery and retail stores) who scored higher on measures of narcissism shared more than others about their work. And this sharing on social media, in person and elsewhere increased their narcissistic feelings in the moment.” I hope this goes without saying, but let me just emphasize that not all essential workers are narcissists, obviously, and all essential workers are, well, essential, no matter what their narcissism score is, and I thank them!

Psychology Today: Cybersmiling, A Social Media Positive

Psychology Today: Cybersmiling, A Social Media Positive. “As is true of so many phenomena in our world, the effects of social media and the internet are mixed when it comes to the human experience. So, from the perspective of someone who’s been pretty vocal about the adverse effects of social media on the modern world, here are three points that speak to the bright side.”

Psychology Today: State-Sponsored Bullshit, and Why Truth Matters

Psychology Today: State-Sponsored Bullshit, and Why Truth Matters. “This important guest post had to be reviewed by the United States government before I could share it with you. That’s ironic, because the authors are challenging the government’s sweeping pre-publication review process in this article. That challenge is part of their broader examination of the normalization of bullshit in contemporary American politics and government, and how very dangerous that is.”

PsyPost: Sociopathic traits linked to non-compliance with mask guidelines and other COVID-19 containment measures

PsyPost: Sociopathic traits linked to non-compliance with mask guidelines and other COVID-19 containment measures. “New research from Brazil has found that people who are unconcerned with adhering to measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 tend to display higher levels of traits associated with antisocial personality disorder, also known as sociopathy. The findings have been published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.”

University of Texas at Dallas: Professor Helps Launch Platform for Online Developmental Psychology Studies

University of Texas at Dallas: Professor Helps Launch Platform for Online Developmental Psychology Studies. “University of Texas at Dallas psychologist Dr. Candice Mills is one of six scientists from six U.S. universities coast to coast who joined forces to launch the Children Helping Science project, which is designed to increase participation in online developmental psychology studies. Mills, an associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, described the website as a venue where families can view a large database of ongoing research projects from universities around the world to find studies about child development that they can do from home.”