Boston Globe: This Twitter account tells you the general mood of MBTA riders by the hour

Boston Globe: This Twitter account tells you the general mood of MBTA riders by the hour. “Riders have long been able to turn to the MBTA’s Twitter account and online alerts to get updates and find out what’s happening around the transit system. But now, there’s more available than just announcements about a train’s arrival time. People can also find out how fellow commuters are feeling about the transit agency’s daily performance.”

Anthropocene: Using social media to measure air pollution’s psychological toll

Anthropocene: Using social media to measure air pollution’s psychological toll. “People are less happy on days when the air is more polluted, according to an analysis of 210 million posts on the Chinese social media site Sina Weibo. Researchers have suspected that air pollution takes a psychological toll generally, and that dirty air due to industrialization, coal burning, and motor vehicles has become a drag on well-being for Chinese city dwellers. But these effects are difficult to measure.”

Case Western Reserve University: Database funded to help researchers understand the effect of bipolar disorder throughout adult life span

Case Western Reserve University: Database funded to help researchers understand the effect of bipolar disorder throughout adult life span. “Not much is known about how bipolar disorder (BD) affects people throughout their lives. Do women and men differ in the severity of their symptoms? Does a person’s age when a bipolar diagnosis is made have any bearing on how severe the symptoms are? How do other medical conditions affect symptoms of BD across the life span? These questions and others like them are the focus of an international team of researchers, joined by Martha Sajatovic, professor of psychiatry and of neurology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, who has received a three-year, $600,000 grant from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders. She and her colleagues will develop the first-of-its-kind multi-national database that can be used to help researchers address questions about BD throughout the adult life span.”

Nieman Lab: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing — no, seriously, it is, according to this new research

Nieman Lab: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing — no, seriously, it is, according to this new research. “People who’ve scanned Facebook for news gain a little knowledge. Why do some of them think they’ve gained a lot? Consider statements like ‘I feel that I need to experience strong emotions regularly’ and ‘I feel like I need a good cry every now and then.’ How much do these statements apply to you?”

ScienceBlog: Surprising Link Between Social Media And Happiness

ScienceBlog: Surprising Link Between Social Media And Happiness. “People flock to Facebook to see the latest wedding news, vacation photos, new baby arrival, or home purchase. Most people, research indicates, head to their newsfeeds to passively watch and compare, much more often than post their own news or updates. But, it turns out, some of us prefer to look at and compare ourselves to certain types of individuals: those who make us feel better about ourselves. And that, in turn, can lead to an increase in happiness and life satisfaction.”

EurekAlert: People think and behave differently in virtual reality than they do in real life

EurekAlert: People think and behave differently in virtual reality than they do in real life . “Immersive virtual reality (VR) can be remarkably lifelike, but new UBC research has found a yawning gap between how people respond psychologically in VR and how they respond in real life.”

London School of Economics and Political Science: Differences in men’s and women’s academic productivity persist and are most pronounced for publications in top journals

London School of Economics and Political Science: Differences in men’s and women’s academic productivity persist and are most pronounced for publications in top journals. “Sabrina Mayer & Justus Rathmann present statistical evidence indicating a persistent difference in research productivity between male and female professors in psychology. Examining the publication records of full psychology professors in Germany, they reveal that female professors are less likely to publish in top ranked journals and are more likely to adopt publication strategies that are focused on producing book chapters in edited collections.”