Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts

Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts. “Why do we share posts on Facebook? Are we seeking factual information, like the name of the plant taking over the front yard? Are we expressing frustration while seeking sympathy? Is it pure narcissism or narcissism by proxy, via our children? Is it bragging, or bragging’s sneaky cousin, humblebragging? Or is it something worse?”

It’s not me, it’s you: Our Facebook fears are mostly about all those other gullible types (Nieman Lab)

Nieman Lab: It’s not me, it’s you: Our Facebook fears are mostly about all those other gullible types. “A number of prominent figures have called for some sort of regulation of Facebook — including one of the company’s co-founders and a venture capitalist who was one of Facebook’s early backers. Much of the criticism of Facebook relates to how the company’s algorithms target users with advertising, and the “echo chambers” that can show users ideologically slanted content. Despite the public criticism, the company has continued to post record profits. And billions of people — including more than two-thirds of American adults — continue to use the unregulated version of Facebook that exists now.”

The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products (Hacker Noon)

Hacker Noon: The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products. “More technology requires us to give up our privacy for the cost of better personalization. But how to fix the issue of ever growing lack of trust in our society? More and more brands are asking people for trust based on their promises and by being transparent about its policies. But the psychology of trust works quite differently. There have been many attempts and debates happening around the black box of algorithms and being transparent about how the algorithms work. But I would like to ask: Is transparency enough? Is it an effective way to build a long-lasting relationship with a customer? Is it going to build trust in a brand and in a product?”

The Ohio State University: Tech fixes can’t protect us from disinformation campaigns

The Ohio State University: Tech fixes can’t protect us from disinformation campaigns. “More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns, said Erik Nisbet and Olga Kamenchuk of The Ohio State University.”

Boston Globe: This Twitter account tells you the general mood of MBTA riders by the hour

Boston Globe: This Twitter account tells you the general mood of MBTA riders by the hour. “Riders have long been able to turn to the MBTA’s Twitter account and online alerts to get updates and find out what’s happening around the transit system. But now, there’s more available than just announcements about a train’s arrival time. People can also find out how fellow commuters are feeling about the transit agency’s daily performance.”

Anthropocene: Using social media to measure air pollution’s psychological toll

Anthropocene: Using social media to measure air pollution’s psychological toll. “People are less happy on days when the air is more polluted, according to an analysis of 210 million posts on the Chinese social media site Sina Weibo. Researchers have suspected that air pollution takes a psychological toll generally, and that dirty air due to industrialization, coal burning, and motor vehicles has become a drag on well-being for Chinese city dwellers. But these effects are difficult to measure.”

Case Western Reserve University: Database funded to help researchers understand the effect of bipolar disorder throughout adult life span

Case Western Reserve University: Database funded to help researchers understand the effect of bipolar disorder throughout adult life span. “Not much is known about how bipolar disorder (BD) affects people throughout their lives. Do women and men differ in the severity of their symptoms? Does a person’s age when a bipolar diagnosis is made have any bearing on how severe the symptoms are? How do other medical conditions affect symptoms of BD across the life span? These questions and others like them are the focus of an international team of researchers, joined by Martha Sajatovic, professor of psychiatry and of neurology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, who has received a three-year, $600,000 grant from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders. She and her colleagues will develop the first-of-its-kind multi-national database that can be used to help researchers address questions about BD throughout the adult life span.”