The Telegraph: How just one Facebook ‘like’ can be used to influence behaviour with targeted adverts

The Telegraph: How just one Facebook ‘like’ can be used to influence behaviour with targeted adverts. “Researchers used ‘mass psychological persuasion’ in an online ad campaign that saw sales rise by more than 50 percent. In an experiment that targeted 3.5 million people, the academics used just a single Facebook ‘like’ for each user to glean a psychological trait – whether they were introverted or extroverted. This characteristic was then used to tailor an ad for each consumer in an effort to influence them.”

The Sociable: How social media affects our collective unconscious

The Sociable: How social media affects our collective unconscious . “In 1912 psychoanalyst Carl Jung split from his mentor Sigmund Freud and went on to develop his own theories on the nature of consciousness. Using the Jungian model of consciousness, backed with academic studies on social media as it relates to the brain, we can analyze what effects social media has not only on our personal subconscious, but our society’s collective unconscious as well.”

CBS New York: Study Looks At How Fake News Thrives On Social Media

CBS New York: Study Looks At How Fake News Thrives On Social Media. ” A new study by Columbia University shows people tend to question news less when they see themselves in a public group compared to how often they fact-check information while alone, a trend which may explain how fake news spreads on social media.”

Phys.org: What social media reveals about your personality

Phys.org: What social media reveals about your personality. “Since the inception of social media, a prodigious amount of status updates, tweets, and comments have been posted online. The language people use to express themselves can provide clues about the kind of people they are, online and off. Current efforts to understand personality from writing samples rely on theories and survey data from the 1980s. New research from the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) uses social media data to successfully identify differences and similarities between users without prior assumptions. This is a step toward building a better understanding of the psychology of human personality.” The researchers started with Reddit, which I thought was interesting.

EurekAlert: People ‘phone snubbed’ by others often turn to phones, social media for acceptance, Baylor study

EurekAlert: People ‘phone snubbed’ by others often turn to phones, social media for acceptance, Baylor study . “People who are phone snubbed – or ‘phubbed’ – by others are, themselves, often turning to their smartphones and social media to find acceptance, according to new research from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.” If you, like me, have no sodding idea what “phubbing” means, this article might help..

Wired: Facebook teaches bots how to negotiate. They learn to lie instead

Wired: Facebook teaches bots how to negotiate. They learn to lie instead. “The Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research (FAIR) group, in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology, has released code that it says will allow bots to negotiate. The problem? A paper published this week on the R&D reveals that the negotiating bots learned to lie. Facebook’s chatbots are in danger of becoming a little too much like real-world sales agents.”

Phys.org: Study suggests people less likely to fact check news when in company of other people

Phys.org: Study suggests people less likely to fact check news when in company of other people. “In practice, it should be easy to avoid falling prey to fake news—upon reading something that may not sound right, all a person has to do is type a few words and run a Google search. But people do not always behave in logical ways. In this new effort, the research trio sought to better understand fact checking by conducting eight experiments designed to determine under which circumstances people are more or less likely to fact check a news article they have just read. The researchers enlisted the assistance of 200 people, all near 36 years old. In the experiments, the volunteers were asked to read a news article and then to perform some tasks related to their feelings regarding the accuracy of the article.”