Psychology Today: The Rise of Social-Media Psychotherapy

Psychology Today: The Rise of Social-Media Psychotherapy. “So, we now have a generation of individuals who are educating themselves about mental health, seeking treatment for their mental health in a more technology-centered culture, and perfectly comfortable discussing personal aspects of their lives on a public forum. It should be no surprise that there are few qualms about sharing a therapy session online for others to see.”

Jerusalem Post: Psychotherapy goes online in the age of coronavirus

Jerusalem Post: Psychotherapy goes online in the age of coronavirus. “One hundred years ago, Sigmund Freud’s patients would lie down on the couch and were encouraged to free-associate, to say whatever was on their mind. Eventually, people began to recognize the psychoanalytic couch as the symbol of psychoanalysis. If Freud were alive today, he would probably find himself sitting in front of a computer, like so many other therapists in all corners of the world.”

Therapists and Patients Find Common Ground: Virus-Fueled Anxiety (New York Times)

New York Times: Therapists and Patients Find Common Ground: Virus-Fueled Anxiety. “On a good day, New York City is awash in its neuroses, a tightly wound place where a wide assortment of sky-scraping anxieties can build to an almost comic crescendo. But with the coronavirus pandemic grinding on, that angst has reached new heights. Many New Yorkers are cloistered in their homes, often jammed tight with family or roommates; others must report to work in a contaminated city. They are dealing with isolation and fear; some have lost their jobs. Others are sick or in grief. It can be overwhelming, even for the mental health professionals tasked with easing such problems.”

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets. “Despite appeals from the so-called therapy generation, a lot of mental health care remains prohibitively expensive and moderately stigmatized in the United States. Of the nearly 1 in 5 adults in this country who experience mental illness, just over 42 percent received mental health services in 2017. Mental health professionals are seeking to address this issue, in part by doling out advice online.”

Library of Congress’ Sigmund Freud Collection Goes Online

The Library of Congress has put its Sigmund Freud collection online. “The online edition comprises the personal papers of Freud and members of his family. It includes correspondence, manuscripts of Freud’s writings, calendars, notebooks, legal documents and certificates, and Freud’s pocket watch, among many other items. Also available online are transcripts of the Eissler interviews, more than a hundred of which are newly opened and available for the first time. Omitted from the online collection is a large supplemental file of secondary source material that largely dates after Freud’s death.”