ClutchPoints: Kobe Bryant murals are still going up — and still making an impact

New-to-me, from ClutchPoints: a crowdsourced map of Kobe Bryant murals. “After the untimely passing of Kobe and his daughter Gianna, along with John, Keri, and Alyssa Altobelli, Sarah and Payton Chester, Christina Mauser, and Ara Zobayan — two years ago today — a poignant phenomenon commenced: grieving artists and fans from every corner of the planet began memorializing the victims on all types of canvasses: skin, courts, wood, skyscrapers, and — of course — walls. One lifelong Lakers fan, Mike, launched a hub to track these works and offer useful guides for those who want to visit them.”

BK Reader: BK Artists Tell Communities’ Stories in New Public Art Projects Seeking to Inspire

BK Reader: BK Artists Tell Communities’ Stories in New Public Art Projects Seeking to Inspire. “Growing up in East New York, artist and organizer Jamel Burgess didn’t know the history of his neighborhood. Now, he’s creating an accessible multimedia digital archive complete with recorded oral histories focusing on the Black and Brown residents of the neighborhood, so that East New York’s youth know the strength they are connected to.”

Atlas Obscura: Welcome to the Spanish Village Saved by Art—And Nearly Destroyed by Fire

Atlas Obscura: Welcome to the Spanish Village Saved by Art—And Nearly Destroyed by Fire. “There was the table-sized mosaic lizard scurrying across the wall near the village church; the three white skeletons lazing on a rooftop; the lamp post, whimsically canted because its base rests on an orange; and the giant pencil drawing a line down the side of a village house. Genalguacil, once a dying rural village, had been reborn in the 21st century as an enchanting open-air gallery of fantastical and surreal public art. Now, as the destructive and deadly fire loomed, so did the question: How to safeguard the art of a town’s museum when the town is the museum?”

BusinessWire: Wescover and Google Lens Change the Way We Discover Art & Designs (PRESS RELEASE)

Business Wire: Wescover and Google Lens Change the Way We Discover Art & Designs (PRESS RELEASE). “Wescover has curated an initial map of art pieces throughout San Francisco that you can look up using Google Lens. When you spot a piece on the map, simply launch Lens, point your camera at it, and you’ll get an exact match of the original artwork––see a video of it being used here. Whether you’re curious about the colorful mural at Craftsman and Wolves coffee shop or you want to buy the same geometric wall hanging that’s at Mister Jiu’s restaurant, Wescover shows you who made what and how to connect with the creator of the piece.” More content will be added over time.

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database. “A statue of Eve by Auguste Rodin that sits outside a Nando’s restaurant in Harlow is one of the first to be included in a new database of publicly owned sculptures in the UK. Charitable organisation Art UK is working on what they say is the largest sculpture cataloguing project ever undertaken in the UK. They endeavour to have listed an estimated 150,000 pieces online by 2020.”

The Globe and Mail: How social media is driving the culture of public art

The Globe and Mail: How social media is driving the culture of public art. “If you live in a major metropolis, you’ve most likely seen those aggressively colourful walls cropping up near coffee houses, gastropubs and boutiques, some with a riot of pastel hearts, others with stencilled angels’ wings to be “worn” by anyone who positions their shoulders underneath. There are graphic walls, too, with feel-good aperçus such as ‘Love Life’ and ‘You Are a Goddess Living in a City of Angels.’ These walls are Grandma’s corny crochet pillows writ large, yet people by the thousands flock to them every month to snap photos. In my neighbourhood, one such wall – full of iridescent pink, orange and blue hearts – can be found kitty-corner to a high-end coffee house, but you can barely see the wall for the crowds that gather like selfie supplicants making pilgrimage. This is not guerrilla […]

San Francisco’s Clarion Alley Mural Project Has An Online Archive

San Francisco’s Clarion Alley Mural Project (CAMP) has launched an online archive. “Since 1992, Clarion Alley has been the site of more than 700 murals, many created by Bay Area and international artists known for their street art and activism. Now, thanks to CAMP’s thorough documentation efforts, viewers can visit the alley remotely, traveling through time to see, among other eye-catching works, Alicia McCarthy’s 1998 mural Where the Bitter End Meets the Rainbow, Aaron Noble and Rigo 23’s 2000 mural Superhero Warehouse and Mel C. Waters’ more recent homage to Prince.”