Input: Flickr deleted, and then undeleted, 5 million archival images

Input: Flickr deleted, and then undeleted, 5 million archival images. “After a Twitter thread by Danish designer Jonas Lönborg brought attention to the heartbreaking erasure, Flickr CEO Don MacAskill responded that Flickr’s recommendation for the Internet Archive to delete the account had been ‘a mistake.’ He explained that the 5 million book images ‘were drowning out the rest of the Commons members’ and announced a new solution: Flickr will restore the account but move it out of the Commons.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Mr. Top Hat Doesn’t Give A Damn! (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Mr. Top Hat Doesn’t Give A Damn!. “There were quite a few entries this year that did ambitious things with their visuals — always a bold challenge to undertake in a 30-day game jam. That’s just not enough time to make something graphically polished, but it’s plenty of time to do something graphically creative, and that’s just what Josh from Dirtbug Games did with Mr. Top Hat Doesn’t Give A Damn! The game mines what is increasingly one of the richest veins of visual assets and inspiration that can be found amidst the material entering the public domain right now: American animation.”

Public Domain Review: 5.2 Million Book Illustrations Deleted from Flickr — Help Get Them Back

Public Domain Review: 5.2 Million Book Illustrations Deleted from Flickr — Help Get Them Back. “Imagine a corner of the internet, free to all, where you could search, browse, and download from an archive of more than 5 million illustrations extracted from public domain books? And more than that, improve metadata by tagging and commenting, and contribute to findability by favouriting and saving images to your own publicly-accessible galleries? This very special space was the Internet Archive Book Images account on Flickr: The Commons. I write was because a couple of weeks ago it was deleted.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Dreaming The Cave (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Dreaming The Cave. “David [Harris] is our one and only returning winner this year, with his third win in a streak after taking Best Analog Game for Fish Magic in 2021 and for The 24th Kandinsky in 2020. Now, with Dreaming The Cave, he has cemented his fascinating niche: games that teach the player about art. And just like the earlier entries, this isn’t some dry educational tool or an unoriginal game with facts and imagery slapped on — rather, it’s a beautifully conceived experience where the gameplay itself is suffused with the meaning and message of the game.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Obstruction Method (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Obstruction Method. “Best Deep Cut is probably our favorite of all the six categories, highlighting games that make use of 1926 works that are obscure, unexpected, or just plain unusual. For the second time in these jams, the winner mined a particularly big but easily-ignored source of material: scientific studies. The Obstruction Method is based on a behaviorist experiment by Frances Holden, entitled A Study of the Effect of Starvation upon Behavior by Means of the Obstruction Method, in which 803 albino rats were variously starved and put through an electrified maze. You can probably already see the potential for a game based on this study, but Jason Morningstar got even more creative than you might expect.”

Internet Archive: New Project Will Unlock Access to Government Publications on Microfiche

Internet Archive: New Project Will Unlock Access to Government Publications on Microfiche. “Government documents from microfiche are coming to archive.org based on the combined efforts of the Internet Archive, Stanford University Libraries, and other library partners. The resulting files will be available for free public access to enable new analysis and access techniques.”

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 4th Annual Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 4th Annual Public Domain Game Jam!. “Well, it took us a little longer than usual, but we’re finally ready to announce the winners of our fourth annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1926! We asked designers to create games based on works published in 1926 (plus some earlier sound recordings, due to the complexities of copyright law) that entered the public domain in the US this year. There seemed to be a lot of excitement around the public domain in 2022, and that resulted in us getting more submissions than in any jam since the first.”

Techdirt: There’s Still Plenty Of Time To Join The Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: There’s Still Plenty Of Time To Join The Public Domain Game Jam!. “We’re approaching the halfway point of the jam, so there’s still plenty of time to sign up on itch.io and start working on an entry! You don’t need to be an experienced game designer to get involved — entries can be as simple as a page of instructions for a roleplaying game or rules that require a normal deck of playing cards. If you want to try your hand at making a digital game, there are easy-to-use tools out there like Story Synth, created by our partner in running these jams, Randy Lubin.”

Found on Reddit: The 13th Edition of Encyclopedia Britannica just entered the public domain!

Found on Reddit: The 13th Edition of Encyclopedia Britannica just entered the public domain! I uploaded it to Archive.org.. “Three new volumes published in 1926 replaced the 12th edition as a supplement to the 11th edition. The new volumes, together with the reprinted 11th edition, constituted the 13th edition. The new volumes were numbered 29 to 31, the 29th volume of the 11th edition becoming the 32nd volume of the 13th edition.”

Gaming Like It’s 1926: Join The Fourth Annual Public Domain Game Jam (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Gaming Like It’s 1926: Join The Fourth Annual Public Domain Game Jam. “Happy new year everyone — and happy public domain day! That’s right: as of today, works from 1926 are now officially in the public domain in the US, and that means it’s time for the latest public domain game jam: Gaming Like It’s 1926, presented by Techdirt and Randy Lubin of Diegetic Games. Just like in past years, we’re calling on game designers of all stripes and levels of experience to create games that make use of, or are based on, material from newly-public-domain works.”

The Verge: Winnie-the-Pooh and around 400,000 early sound recordings enter public domain

The Verge: Winnie-the-Pooh and around 400,000 early sound recordings enter public domain. “A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, and other books, movies, and compositions from 1926 enter into the public domain today in the US. The works are now ‘free for all to copy, share, and build upon,’ according to Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, which tracks which copyrighted materials will become public each year.”

Gaming Like It’s 1926: Get Ready For Our Next Public Domain Game Jam! (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Gaming Like It’s 1926: Get Ready For Our Next Public Domain Game Jam!. “It’s that time of the year again! Four years ago, the US finally started adding older works back into the public domain after a decades-long period of time in which those cultural works were kept from the public (under dubious legal theories). It still remains somewhat ridiculous that we’re waiting 95 years for works to enter the public domain, but at least some things are coming into the public domain! For the past four years we’ve been celebrating newly public domain works each year by hosting a public domain game jam — and this year, it’s Gaming Like It’s 1926!”

Internet Archive: Three Ways to Celebrate the Public Domain in 2022

Internet Archive: Three Ways to Celebrate the Public Domain in 2022. “Due to the recently enacted Music Modernization Act in the U.S., approximately 400,000 sound recordings from the pre-1923 era will join the public domain for the first time in our history. That’s why this year our theme is a Celebration of Sound. Join us for a virtual party on January 20, 2022 at 1pm Pacific/4pm Eastern time with a keynote from Senator Ron Wyden, champion of the Music Modernization Act and a host of musical acts, dancers, historians, librarians, academics, activists and other leaders from the Open world!”