The Atlantic: How Misinfodemics Spread Disease

I missed this from the Atlantic at the end of August: How Misinfodemics Spread Disease. “Now disease also spreads via Facebook statuses and Google results—not just the droplets from a sneeze or the particles that linger in the air when we forget to cough properly into our elbow crease—and around the world, digital health misinformation is having increasingly catastrophic impacts on physical health. Recent research found that Twitter bots were sharing content that contributed to positive sentiments about e-cigarettes. In West Africa, online health misinformation added to the Ebola death toll. In New South Wales, Australia, where the spread of conspiracy theories about water fluoridation run rampant, children suffering from tooth decay are hospitalized for mass extractions at higher rates than in regions where water fluoridation exists.”

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions. “Catching an ear infection is uncomfortable enough, but imagine if the antibiotics a doctor prescribed didn’t work. It’s a problem that at least 2 million people in the U.S. face every year, when they catch infections that are resistant to antibiotics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That makes the phenomenon known as antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, ‘one of the biggest public health challenges of our time,’ the agency said. AMR may cause 10 million deaths globally by 2050, based on rising drug resistance for six pathogens, according to a report commissioned by the British government in 2016.”

University of Utah: Following Twitter Conversations Around Hacked Diabetes Tools To Manage Blood Sugar

University of Utah: Following Twitter Conversations Around Hacked Diabetes Tools To Manage Blood Sugar. “The diabetes online community is leading grassroots efforts focused on accelerating the development, access and adoption of diabetes-related tools to manage the disease. Researchers at University of Utah Health examined the community’s online Twitter conversation to understand their thoughts concerning open source artificial pancreas (OpenAPS) technology. The results of this study are available online in the September 10 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology.”

Donegal Now: National Museum of Ireland of Country Life explores devastating Spanish Flu outbreak from 100 years ago

Donegal Now: National Museum of Ireland of Country Life explores devastating Spanish Flu outbreak from 100 years ago. “The public participation element of the programme will allow students, communities and individuals across the island of Ireland to share and archive their Spanish Flu stories… Stories submitted by the public will be linked to an online interactive map of Ireland, which will allow a global audience to view Irish experiences of the Spanish Flu.”

EurekAlert: Online searches about cardiovascular disease follow strong seasonal and geographical patterns

EurekAlert: Online searches about cardiovascular disease follow strong seasonal and geographical patterns . “There is a strong seasonal pattern in seeking cardiovascular health information on Google, with higher search activity during winter months, according to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Investigators also found that US states with higher deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) have higher CVD-related search volumes compared with regions with lower CVD mortality. By integrating artificial intelligence in healthcare research, the data generated by online cardiovascular health searches could be leveraged in the future to estimate disease activity in the community.”

Richmond News: Health agency to mine social media for study on suicide trends, risk factors

Richmond News: Health agency to mine social media for study on suicide trends, risk factors. “Federal health researchers are looking to mine social media to more quickly identify suicide-related behaviours, instead of relying on woefully outdated data. What the Public Health Agency of Canada wants is an artificial intelligence program that combs social media platforms for keywords to give its researchers a better view of trends and risk factors linked to suicide-related behaviours.”