University of Exeter: COVID-19 is just one factor impacting wellbeing of employees working from home, study finds

University of Exeter: COVID-19 is just one factor impacting wellbeing of employees working from home, study finds. “A new study on work-life balance has found that the COVID-19 crisis is a crucial factor – but not the only one – behind low levels of wellbeing among employees working from home. A research team including Professor Ilke Inceoglu, Professor of Organisational Behaviour and HR Management at the University of Exeter Business School, analysed data from 835 university employees, who completed a baseline questionnaire on wellbeing and took a weekly survey.”

Washington Post: For months, he helped his son keep suicidal thoughts at bay. Then came the pandemic.

Washington Post: For months, he helped his son keep suicidal thoughts at bay. Then came the pandemic.. “Since the coronavirus arrived, depression and anxiety in America have become rampant. Federal surveys show 40 percent of Americans are now grappling with at least one mental health or drug-related problem. But young adults have been hit harder than any other age group, with 75 percent struggling. Even more alarming, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently asked young adults if they had thought about killing themselves in the past 30 days, 1 of 4 said they had.”

Reuters: One in five COVID-19 patients develop mental illness within 90 days – study

Reuters: One in five COVID-19 patients develop mental illness within 90 days – study. “Many COVID-19 survivors are likely to be at greater risk of developing mental illness, psychiatrists said on Monday, after a large study found 20% of those infected with the coronavirus are diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder within 90 days.”

‘A Slow Killer’: Nursing Home Residents Wither in Isolation Forced by the Virus (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘A Slow Killer’: Nursing Home Residents Wither in Isolation Forced by the Virus. “After months of near-isolation inside his senior care facility, Charlie no longer recognizes his wife of almost 50 years. In another nursing home, Susan’s toenails grew so long that she could not squeeze into her shoes. Ida lost 37 pounds and stopped speaking. Minnie cried and asked God to just take her. They are among thousands of older people stricken by another epidemic ravaging America’s nursing homes — an outbreak of loneliness, depression and atrophy fueled by the very lockdowns that were imposed to protect them from the coronavirus.”

As the Coronavirus Surges, a New Culprit Emerges: Pandemic Fatigue (New York Times)

New York Times: As the Coronavirus Surges, a New Culprit Emerges: Pandemic Fatigue. “With no end in sight, many people are flocking to bars, family parties, bowling alleys and sporting events much as they did before the virus hit, and others must return to school or work as communities seek to resuscitate economies. And in sharp contrast to the spring, the rituals of hope and unity that helped people endure the first surge of the virus have given way to exhaustion and frustration.”

In Japan, a revolutionary response to the pandemic: Better work-life balance (Washington Post)

Washington Post: In Japan, a revolutionary response to the pandemic: Better work-life balance. “Picture the traditional grind of the Japanese salaryman: the corporate warrior in suit and tie, commuting to the office in a packed subway train, working long hours, then drinking with his boss and coming home to a cramped Tokyo apartment. Then imagine another type of worker — perhaps a woman — cycling to her office on a picturesque island, with an equally challenging career but spending her weekends by the sea, immersed in nature or relaxing in a hot spring.”

Tulane University: Google search data reveals major panic attack issue, Tulane study shows

Tulane University: Google search data reveals major panic attack issue, Tulane study shows. “The team used Google Trends to analyze an extensive list of mental health-related terms that people searched for before and after the World Health Organization issued a pandemic declaration on March 11, 2020. They found a major jump in searches related to anxiety, panic attacks and treatments for panic attacks, especially remote and self-care techniques, in the weeks following the pandemic declaration.”

MedicalXpress: Study links rising stress, depression in US to pandemic-related losses, media consumption

MedicalXpress: Study links rising stress, depression in US to pandemic-related losses, media consumption. “Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic—such as unemployment—and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study. The report appears in Science Advances.”

Gothamist: New Yorkers Desperate To See Loved Ones In Nursing Homes Say Visitation Rules Do More Harm Than Good

Gothamist: New Yorkers Desperate To See Loved Ones In Nursing Homes Say Visitation Rules Do More Harm Than Good. “Sandra Monahan has not seen her 93-year-old mother in person since the beginning of March. While other New Yorkers have been reuniting with family in the months after the end of the statewide COVID-19 lockdown, Monahan has not been so lucky. Her mother, who she visited every day before the pandemic, is isolated in a nursing home in a Rochester suburb. Once upbeat and highly alert, she is now losing weight and experiencing depression.”

Washington Post: Baseball has never been so lonely, and players are feeling the strain

Washington Post: Baseball has never been so lonely, and players are feeling the strain. “During normal times, there are aspects to a major league season that don’t lend themselves to top-notch mental health. Work is nearly every day. Struggles are laid bare for the public to see. Travel is constant. Baseball is a team sport, but at its worst, there’s no overstating the potential for isolation. And now, here lies the novel coronavirus-shortened 2020 MLB season, unprecedented in so many ways. The star of this show isn’t Max Scherzer or Juan Soto. Rather, it’s the coronavirus pandemic. It has altered American life in ways that, seven months ago, we could not have envisioned. And it is affecting this season in ways we could overlook.”

ABC News: What do Google searches tell us about our mental health?

ABC News: What do Google searches tell us about our mental health?. “More and more, online searches are becoming a primary resource for those seeking health-related information. This is especially true when it comes to stigmatized topics such as mental health, and new research suggests this digital data could prove to be an important tool for monitoring mental health monitoring.”

ScienceBlog: COVID-19 Is Evaporating Casual Connections And Why That’s Bad

ScienceBlog: COVID-19 Is Evaporating Casual Connections And Why That’s Bad. “It’s the conversations with a local barista, a bus driver, a casual work acquaintance, or a person in line at the store that make up what the experts call ‘weak ties’: individuals we don’t know well, if at all, but who nevertheless contribute to our happiness and sense of belonging. These encounters have largely gone missing with the advent of stay-at-home orders and lockdowns issued in an effort to combat the spread of COVID-19, and that loss could be taking a significant toll on our emotional health and professional productivity.”

One size may not fit all: BILH psychiatrists develop mental health app assessment tool (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: One size may not fit all: BILH psychiatrists develop mental health app assessment tool. “About one in five U.S. adults, an estimated 47 million people, lives with a mental illness. Fewer than half of them receive treatment, counseling or medication. In recent years, smartphone apps have emerged as potentially cost-effective means of expanding access to mental healthcare. But with some 10,000 mental health apps — which are not subject to FDA oversight — available in mobile app stores today, the task of determining which apps are safe and effective can seem overwhelming to patients and providers alike.”

Yahoo News: ‘Am I having a panic attack?’ Google anxiety searches break records amid coronavirus pandemic

Yahoo News: ‘Am I having a panic attack?’ Google anxiety searches break records amid coronavirus pandemic. “Scientists from the University of California, San Diego, have since found Google searches for ‘panic attacks’ and ‘anxiety attacks’ in the US were the highest they have been since the data started being collected 16 years ago. More than 3 million anxiety-related searches were carried out in the US alone during the first 58 days of its outbreak.”

New York Times: We’ve Hit a Pandemic Wall

New York Times: We’ve Hit a Pandemic Wall. “I am trying to think of when I first realized we’d all run smack into a wall. Was it two weeks ago, when a friend, ordinarily a paragon of wifely discretion, started a phone conversation with a boffo rant about her husband? Was it when I looked at my own spouse — one week later, this probably was — and calmly told him that each and every one of my problems was his fault? (They were not.)”