SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant

SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant. “The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s University received more than $1.4 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support its mission to preserve and share the world’s handwritten heritage. The grant will fund a three-year project to catalog 53,000 digitized manuscripts and create an online database of authors and titles originating from underrepresented or little-known literary traditions, according to a news release issued by the university Tuesday.”

University of Sydney: How a first edition of Principia with Isaac Newton’s notes got to Sydney

New-to-me, from the University of Sydney: How a first edition of Principia with Isaac Newton’s notes got to Sydney. “While the original print run is estimated at between 250 and 400 copies, there are only 189 surviving first editions in the world and only four with annotations by the English mathematician himself. Of these four copies, the Sydney copy of Principia is the only one in the Southern Hemisphere and is held in the Rare Books & Special Collections at the University of Sydney library…. The University of Sydney copy of Principia has been digitised and is available online alongside other digital resources via the University’s digital collection.”

Boston Globe: 7 Massachusetts projects awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grants

Boston Globe: 7 Massachusetts projects awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grants. “New grant funding for seven Massachusetts-based projects will help protect historic works of art, create new editions of centuries-old books, and build a database that can reveal the history of South Asian paintings through paint pigments.”

DigitalNC: New Additions of The Carolinian Added to DigitalNC

DigitalNC: New Additions of The Carolinian Added to DigitalNC. “Issues of The Carolinian, from 1962 to 1964, have now been added to DigitalNC thanks to our partner, Olivia Raney Local History Library. The Carolinian is an active newspaper still published out of Raleigh, N.C., covering local, regional, and national stories that impact and interest the African American community at large.”

The Next Web: Google’s new AI language model can comprehend entire books

The Next Web: Google’s new AI language model can comprehend entire books . “One of the prime challenges of a language-based AI model is to understand the context of the surrounding content. To solve this problem, Google has introduced a new model called Reformer, which understands the context of 1 million lines using just 16GB space. The company built this to solve problems of its old model Transformer — a neural network that compares words in a paragraph to each other to understand the relationship between them.”

Ohio University: “Book Beat” airs again in Don Swaim Digital Collection

Thanks to Esther S. for this one – I completely missed it. Ohio University: “Book Beat” airs again in Don Swaim Digital Collection. “The Ohio University Libraries’ Don Swaim Collection, featuring over 700 audio interviews of well-known authors from ‘Book Beat,’ the nationally produced CBS Radio News program, is now digitally available online—including digital transcripts of the syndicated news program. From 1982 through 1993 ‘Book Beat,’ hosted by OHIO alumnus Don Swaim (1959), ran daily snippets of the candid taped interviews of famous authors such as Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, John Irving, Ray Bradbury and many others.”

Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874: Now Online (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874: Now Online. “The striking, forward-thinking motto, ‘Right Is of No Sex–Truth Is of No Color–God Is the Father of Us All, and All We Are Brethren,’ initially appeared on December 3, 1847 in the first issue of The North Star, the earliest newspaper African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass founded and edited. That issue is one of 568 now digitized and freely available in Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874 on the Library of Congress website.”