American Kennel Club: AKC Launches Digital Library To Commemorate Anniversary

American Kennel Club: AKC Launches Digital Library To Commemorate Anniversary. “The digital library will include the entire run of the AKC Gazette from 1889 to the present day. The AKC Gazette is the longest continuously published dog magazine in America and one of the oldest sporting publications in the country. Users can also search a collection of historic Show Catalogs from 1887 – 1983, including the very first Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show catalog from 1877. New collections will be added to the digital library in 2023. All content is made available without fees and is fully text-searchable thanks to Optical Character Recognition in PDF files, which makes the library user-friendly.”

New York Times: In India, Debunking Fake News and Running Into the Authorities

New York Times: In India, Debunking Fake News and Running Into the Authorities. “Led by its founders, Mohammed Zubair and Pratik Sinha, Alt News has criticized supporters and officials of Mr. Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party for their statements targeting minorities. But in a reflection of the growing concerns about the independence and freedom of the news media in India, Mr. Zubair has landed in the authorities’ cross hairs.”

Library of Congress: Chronicling America Reaches 50 States

Library of Congress: Chronicling America Reaches 50 States. “NEH recently awarded its first grant award to a National Digital Newspaper Program partner for the state of New Hampshire, ensuring access to significant newspapers from the entire United States. Dartmouth College will serve as the New Hampshire state hub, partnering with the New Hampshire State Library, the New Hampshire Historical Society, and the University of New Hampshire Library to identify historical newspapers that reflect the state’s political, economic, and cultural history for inclusion in Chronicling America.”

University of Chicago: Is a book hidden inside a decades-old piece of concrete? Scientists seek answers to art mystery

University of Chicago: Is a book hidden inside a decades-old piece of concrete? Scientists seek answers to art mystery. “The piece in question is called Betonbuch, or Concrete Book, and is the work of German-born artist Wolf Vostell. He was part of Fluxus, an international community of experimental creators that flourished in the 1960s and 1970s, and was a pioneer of using concrete as a material for art, not just construction. In 1971, Vostell wrote a short book called Betonierungen, or Concretifications, and as evidence of his commitment to the material, he purportedly encased 100 copies of that book in numbered slabs of concrete.”

BusinessWire: American Library Association Highlights Increasing Censorship Attempts During Banned Books Week Programming (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: American Library Association Highlights Increasing Censorship Attempts During Banned Books Week Programming (PRESS RELEASE). “Libraries nationwide will join the American Library Association to highlight increased censorship of books during this year’s Banned Books Week, taking place September 18-24, 2022. The American Library Association (ALA), Unite Against Banned Books (UABB) and the Banned Books Week Coalition are planning extensive programming during the week, bringing together authors, librarians and scholars to share perspectives on censorship.”

Brown University: Brown Library publishes five new volumes in the “Race & … in America” digital book series

Brown University: Brown Library publishes five new volumes in the “Race & … in America” digital book series . “Open access publication expands series delving into comparative perspectives on the roots and effects of racism in the U.S…. As an open access publication, the digital series provides enduring, barrier-free access to knowledge, and has been developed with universal design principles for equitable use by all persons, including those with disabilities.”

University of Toronto: Student project creates accessible database of Canada’s first newspapers

University of Toronto: Student project creates accessible database of Canada’s first newspapers. “Led by Sébastien Drouin, an associate professor in the department of language studies at U of T Scarborough, the bilingual project, ‘Early Modern Canadian Newspapers Online’ is a collection of newspapers from the second half of the eighteenth century – from 1752 to 1810 – printed in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Québec and Ontario.”

NOLA: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, historian renowned for research into Louisiana slavery, dies at 93

NOLA: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, historian renowned for research into Louisiana slavery, dies at 93. “Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, a New Orleans-born historian who revolutionized teaching about slavery in Louisiana by applying computer technology to information she unearthed in musty archives and courthouse records throughout the state, died Monday at her home in Guanajuato, Mexico. She was 93.”

An excerpt from Josh O’Kane’s Sideways: The City Google Couldn’t Buy, a book revealing the collapse and failure of Sidewalk Labs (The Globe & Mail)

The Globe & Mail: An excerpt from Josh O’Kane’s Sideways: The City Google Couldn’t Buy, a book revealing the collapse and failure of Sidewalk Labs. “Josh O’Kane spent more than two years covering Google affiliate Sidewalk Labs’ controversial ‘smart city’ in Toronto for The Globe and Mail. On Sept. 13, Random House Canada will publish Sideways: The City Google Couldn’t Buy, his book revealing the inside story of the failed project and the company’s collapse. The following is an exclusive excerpt from the book.”

University of Wyoming: UW Extension Releases New High-Altitude Cookbook

University of Wyoming: UW Extension Releases New High-Altitude Cookbook. “University of Wyoming Extension recently released its new ‘High-Altitude Baking’ cookbook, a collection of original elevation-adjusted and user-tested recipes ranging from cakes and cookies to scones, muffins, breads and pizza. Available in print and online, the publication offers more than 100 tasty altitude-adjusted recipes, all tested at both 3,500 feet and 7,200 feet (and other elevations in between).” The online version is free to download.

Library of Congress: Historical Newspapers for National History Day

Library of Congress: Historical Newspapers for National History Day. “Explore the Frontier and learn to use Chronicling America, a freely-available collection of historic American newspapers at the Library of Congress for research in this year’s National History Day theme ‘Frontiers in History: People, Places, Ideas.’” Thursday, September 15. It will be archived for later viewing if you can’t make the live event.

NPR: Social media can inflame your emotions — and it’s a byproduct of its design

NPR: Social media can inflame your emotions — and it’s a byproduct of its design. “If you feel like checking social media leaves you feeling angrier and more outraged, that’s not your imagination. Max Fisher has covered the impact of social media around the world for The New York Times, from genocide in Myanmar to COVID misinformation in the U.S. And in his new book, ‘The Chaos Machine,’ he describes how the polarizing effect of social media is speeding up.”