JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection. “The Angolite is one of the most famous prison newspapers in history, having won multiple awards and changed the popular conception of what prison journalism could be. The paper is produced by the people incarcerated at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially known as Angola for the slave plantation that preceded it…. At present, the sprawling prison farm is 28 square miles, 18,000 acres. It is the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, and the state of Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the nation.”

DPLA: DPLA releases The Covid Archive as free ebook

DPLA: DPLA releases The Covid Archive as free ebook. “Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is pleased to announce the publication of a free ebook, The Covid Archive: A finding aid to government documents related to the Covid19 Pandemic. The Covid Archive is a digital finding aid for the digital archive of government documents related to the response of U.S. federal and state governments to the Covid 19 pandemic. The finding aid provides an index to more than 3,000 government documents related to the pandemic response that were identified by the Covid Tracking Project and digitally preserved by DPLA.”

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing. “[Cree] Myles first partnered with Penguin Random House last year, when she organized a read-a-thon called Black Like We Never Left featuring works by Toni Morrison. The late, heralded, Pulitzer and Nobel-prize winning author was published by Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House. A few months later Penguin Random House offered Myles a job curating an Instagram platform centered on Black books.”

Hill Air Force Base: Base history through newspaper digital archive

Hill Air Force Base: Base history through newspaper digital archive . “Hill AFB’s history has been preserved and now it’s offered free to anyone with computer access. Hill’s base newspaper, the Hilltop Times, and its predecessor, the Hill Fielder is available online in a searchable database offered by the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library.” This looks like an extension of the access that was first established in 2018.

Good E-Reader: The Amazon Kindle will support EPUB in late 2022

Good E-Reader: The Amazon Kindle will support EPUB in late 2022. “Amazon has announced that all of the modern Kindle e-readers will support the most popular ebook format in the world, EPUB. The company recently updated their Send to Kindle documentation and stated that it will add support for EPUB later this year. Send to Kindle will suspend the ability to load in MOBI, since it is an older file format and won’t support the newest Kindle features for documents. If you have MOBI books already on your Kindle, they will continue to be accessible. Amazon is also disabling to the ability to send AZW to the Kindle.”

Australian Ceramics: The Complete 60-Year Archive Of The Journal Of Australian Ceramics Is Now Available!

Australian Ceramics: The Complete 60-Year Archive Of The Journal Of Australian Ceramics Is Now Available!. “The Australian Ceramics Association is delighted to announce that the digital archive of The Journal of Australian Ceramics has now been completed in collaboration with publishing services provider Exact Editions, dating back to 1962. Individuals and institutions can subscribe for unlimited and fully-searchable access to over 170 back issues and counting, with new issues published three times a year.”

Washington Examiner: Meet the publisher bringing JRR Tolkien and military manuals to Ukraine’s readers

Washington Examiner: Meet the publisher bringing JRR Tolkien and military manuals to Ukraine’s readers. “[Oleh] Feschowetz did not enter the book industry to promote military expertise. He left a senior post in the philosophy department at the nearby Ivan Franko National University more than two decades ago on a ‘mission to return Ukraine to the Western civilization’ — a goal reflected in the selection of poetry, philosophy, and literature available in his catalog. And yet, the martial texts only sharpened the edge of the publisher’s broader efforts. ‘Because Russia always interpret[s] the culture just like a weapon,’ he said in another conversation. ‘We must do the same. Culture is a weapon.’”

The Edwardsville Intelligencer: New tool lets you to search for books set in your hometown

The Edwardsville Intelligencer: New tool lets you to search for books set in your hometown. “Creators at Crossword Solver have made a database linked with Goodreads.com that will allow searchers to find the top books in the categories of historical, mystery, romance, thriller, sci-fi and fantasy in the setting of their choice. Information also shows which cities and states are the top in each respective category and how many books are based in those locations.”

NewScientist: Journey through the huge archive keeping the nation’s newspapers safe

NewScientist: Journey through the huge archive keeping the nation’s newspapers safe. “The British Library’s National Newspaper Building in Boston Spa holds millions of pages from newspapers spanning centuries. New Scientist got a rare chance to go inside the void to see the robot cranes in action and find out about the measures in place to protect the history within.” Just-over-three-minute video. Captions are auto-generated but good.

University of Utah: Digitizing 133 years of Salt Lake Tribune newspapers

University of Utah: Digitizing 133 years of Salt Lake Tribune newspapers. “Researchers, historians and genealogists now have an additional 1.6 million pages of The Salt Lake Tribune, at their fingertips. The recent digitizing process added issues dating from 1920 to 2004, to the existing online collection of issues between 1871 and 1919. All 133 years are now keyword searchable and available to the public thanks to a partnership between the U’s J. Willard Marriott Library, Newspapers.com, a division of Ancestry and The Salt Lake Tribune.”

BloodHorse: Equine Library Donated to Cal Poly Pomona

BloodHorse: Equine Library Donated to Cal Poly Pomona. “The California Thoroughbred Foundation is donating the contents of the Carleton F. Burke Library in Arcadia—one of the most extensive collections of equine literature found anywhere—to California State Polytechnic University, Pomona…. The university intends to digitize research books for worldwide access, exposing the Burke Library to a far wider audience than the Foundation could offer.”