Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive

Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive. “Back issues of the Colonist are more accessible than ever before, thanks to a digitization project led by the University of Victoria. Back issues from 1858 to 1970 are online… and the 1970s will be added early in 2019. As John Lutz, a history professor at the University of Victoria, has said, the website is a game-changer in historical research in B.C.”

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content. “Back in June, I announced that we had completed an inventory of all serials with active copyright renewals made through 1977, based on listings in the Copyright Office’s Catalog of Copyright Entries. At the time, I said we’d also be releasing a draft of suggested procedures for using the information there, along with other data, to quickly identify and check public domain serial content. (If you’ve been following the Public Domain Day advent calendar I’ve been publishing this month, you’ll have seen the inventory or its records mentioned in some recent entries.) It took a little longer than I’d hoped, but after having some librarians and IP experts have a look at it, I’m pleased to announce that the draft of ‘Determining copyright status of serial issues’ is open for public comment.”

The ultimate literary bucket list: ‘1,000 Books to Read Before You Die’ (Irish Times)

Irish Times: The ultimate literary bucket list: ‘1,000 Books to Read Before You Die’. “[James] Mustich is keenly aware that the compendium is bound to be intensely subjective, the product of his own taste, at a particular moment in time. He acknowledges that even when people agree with him about the inclusion of a certain book, they might not like it for the same reasons. This is why 1,000 Books has an accompanying website… where readers can nominate their own favourites.”

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language. “A team of researchers and engineers at Huawei AI has come up with a unique way to help deaf children learn to read sign language—by using AI and augmented reality to interpret printed books. They have also hit on a way to help deaf children develop enjoyment in reading.”

People and plants: Working together for the planet (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: People and plants: Working together for the planet . “Plants, People, Planet, a cross-disciplinary Open Access journal, launches today with its first issue. Plants, People, Planet will publish peer-reviewed articles, opinion and review that focuses on the connections between plant science and society. The new journal aims to celebrate everything new, innovative and exciting in plant sciences that is relevant to society and peoples’ daily lives.”

EurekAlert: Chiba University launched Open Access Resource ‘c-arc’

EurekAlert: Chiba University launched Open Access Resource ‘c-arc’ . “Chiba University launched a new academic resource collection named ‘Chiba University Academic Resource Collections (c-arc)’ which makes contents published and provided by Chiba University Libraries widely available on the web…. Now “c-arc” offers Rare eastern medicine book collection, Horticulture book collection on Edo-Meiji era, Archive of the family Machino and Fungi and Actinomycetes gallery.”

Big Think: ‘The Journal of Controversial Ideas’ will launch in 2019. Is it dangerous?

Big Think: ‘The Journal of Controversial Ideas’ will launch in 2019. Is it dangerous?. “Three very famous philosophers are teaming up to create an academic journal dedicated to ideas too controversial to put a name on. As you might expect, the concept itself has already gathered controversy.”