Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions

Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions. “Published by the BFI since 1932 Sight & Sound has partnered with digital publishing experts Exact Editions to develop this comprehensive research tool for institutions, universities, schools and other organisations around the world. With the archive’s launch, film fanatics and academics anywhere will be able to study 85 years of back issues of the magazine, as well as its long-running sister publication Monthly Film Bulletin (1934-1991), at the click of a button.”

Podcast: How $100 Million Could Help Digitize Millions of Important Books (Chronicle of Philanthropy)

Chronicle of Philanthropy: Podcast: How $100 Million Could Help Digitize Millions of Important Books . It is a podcast, but there is a transcript. “One of the eight semifinalists in the 100&Change MacArthur Foundation competition is the Internet Archive. To win the $100 million prize, the organization proposes expediting and expanding work already well underway: digitizing 4 million of the world’s most important books for libraries to lend to the public. In this edition of the Business of Giving, Brewster Kahle, founder and digital librarian of the Internet Archive, and Wendy Hanamura, director of partnerships, share information about their progress.”

Ars Technica: New book explores how protesters—and governments—use Internet tactics

Ars Technica: New book explores how protesters—and governments—use Internet tactics. “In February 2003, the largest demonstration in Britain’s history saw two million people march across London to protest the approaching Iraq War. Dozens of other cities across the world saw similar events, and yet. Why did politicians feel safe ignoring the millions who participated in those marches—yet stand down after the protests against the proposed intellectual property laws SOPA and PIPA? Why did Occupy apparently vanish while the Tea Party has embedded itself into US national electoral politics? How much did Facebook really have to do with the Arab Spring? How—and this is the central question technosociologist Zeynep Tufecki considers in her new book, Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest—do digital media change the reality and effectiveness of social protest?”

Read all about it: Concordy archives dating to 1877 now online (Union College)

Union College: Read all about it: Concordy archives dating to 1877 now online. “When the first issue of The Concordiensis appeared on Nov. 1, 1877, its editors had a simple mission: ‘to be a genuine representative of the culture and scholarship, the manliness and enterprise of Union,’ in such a way ‘that no alumnus will be willing to forego it, both by a lively exhibit of the present doings, and by such copious and familiar information concerning graduates, that the memory of her gray old walls may be kept green in every heart loyal to his Alma Mater.’ The public can now judge whether that mission has been upheld for more than a century.” The Concordiensis is the newspaper for Union college.

Sentinel Source: Digital archive created for historical newspapers of the Monadnock Region (NH)

Sentinel Source (New Hampshire): Digital archive created for historical newspapers of the Monadnock Region. “The Peterborough Town Library will embark on a digitization project to make the region’s historical newspapers fully accessible online through a digital archive. The Contoocook Transcript, The Peterborough Messenger and The Peterborough Transcript will be among the first newspapers to be made available digitally. Up until now, these historical newspapers have only been available in print and on microfilm at the library.”

UNC: 100 Years of the Daily Tar Heel Now Available Freely Online

University of North Carolina: 100 Years of the Daily Tar Heel Now Available Freely Online. “We are very excited to announce that papers spanning the first 100 years of the Daily Tar Heel have been digitized and are now freely available online through the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. The digital collection covers the years 1893-1992. It contains 73,179 pages in 12,168 issues.”

Free on the Internet Archive: 255 issues of Galaxy Magazines, 1950-1976 (Boing Boing)

New-to-me, from Boing Boing: Free on the Internet Archive: 255 issues of Galaxy Magazines, 1950-1976. “The Internet Archive has nearly the entire run of Galaxy for your perusal, with classic stories by Le Guin, Cherryh, Heinlein, Bradbury, Asimov, Bester, and other pioneers. Also available is most of IF, Galaxy’s sister magazine.”