KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized. “The three newspapers came out of the fort in the 1920s through the 1940s. During that period of history, three infantry divisions at Fort Huachuca were made up of black men. The 25th, 92nd and 93rd. Each had their own unique newsletter designed to keep families of those soldiers up-to-date with what they were doing.”

University of Wyoming: UW Libraries, Wyoming State Library Launch New Digital Historic Newspaper Collection

University of Wyoming: UW Libraries, Wyoming State Library Launch New Digital Historic Newspaper Collection. “University of Wyoming Libraries and the Wyoming State Library have partnered to launch the Wyoming Digital Newspaper Collection online. This collection of historic newspapers combines the digital holdings of both institutions with a new interface that is more robust, providing easier, customizable searches and better results. More than 800,000 pages are now available, with new content added monthly.”

New York Times: How Getting Canceled on Social Media Can Derail a Book Deal

New York Times: How Getting Canceled on Social Media Can Derail a Book Deal. “Simon & Schuster invoked part of its contract typically referred to as a morals clause, which allows a publisher to drop a book if the author does something that is likely to seriously damage sales. Widely detested by agents and authors, these clauses have become commonplace in mainstream publishing over the last few years. The clauses are rarely used to sever a relationship, but at a time when an online posting can wreak havoc on a writer’s reputation, most major publishing houses have come to insist upon them.”

Click on Detroit: Epicurious is righting cultural wrongs one recipe at a time

Click on Detroit: Epicurious is righting cultural wrongs one recipe at a time. “With a new Black editor in chief and ambitious promises to do better, a little corner of the Conde Nast universe is taking on racial and cultural injustice one recipe at a time. Since July, the small staff at Epicurious, a resource site for home cooks, has been scouring 55 years’ worth of recipes from a variety of Conde Nast magazines in search of objectionable titles, ingredient lists and stories told through a white American lens.”

NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too

NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too. “To read Nation articles more than seven days old — like this report that thousands of students have failed to turn up at schools after their nine-month closure due to Covid-19 or a viral column asking ‘Who is the banana republic now?’ following the U.S. Capitol riot — users will have to pay up. Subscriptions start at 50Ksh for one week, 150Ksh for one month, or 750Ksh for one year. (50Ksh is about 45 cents USD.)”

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You. “Some species of technology go extinct for good reason. The penny-farthing, with its huge front wheel, seems vaguely ridiculous in retrospect—and also pretty dangerous. In a Darwinian struggle, it should die. But sometimes an innovation dies out for some other, lesser reason—one that’s more a function of the market at the time, or other considerations, than any overarching principle of quality…. Many other good ideas have gotten buried in the past and are waiting to be rediscovered.”

The Hate Store: Amazon’s Self-Publishing Arm Is a Haven for White Supremacists (ProPublica)

ProPublica: The Hate Store: Amazon’s Self-Publishing Arm Is a Haven for White Supremacists. “‘There is a lot of extremist content on Amazon,’ said J. M. Berger, who studies such works as a fellow with the E.U.-funded VOX-Pol research network. ‘The platform has gone largely overlooked because, understandably, we think of books differently than other content. But these products are for sale and they’re being algorithmically pushed.’ We tested the recommendations for many far-right texts and discovered several that could lead users down a hate-filled rabbit hole, where the suggested books reinforce a white nationalist worldview. “

PetaPixel: You Can Read 165 Years of the Royal Photographic Society’s Journal for Free

Not sure how new, but new-to-me, from PetaPixel: You Can Read 165 Years of the Royal Photographic Society’s Journal for Free. “The Royal Photographic Society Journal is the oldest continually published photographic periodical in the world, and its entire archive of issues from 1853 to 2018 is available to read online… for free. As described by the organization, the Royal Photographic Society Journal has covered artistic and technical developments within photography over the last century and a half.”

Garage: How ’70s Magazine “Radical Software” Predicted the Future

New-to-me, from Garage: How ’70s Magazine “Radical Software” Predicted the Future. “In the spring of 1970, a group of self-proclaimed “hardware freaks” published the first issue of Radical Software, a print magazine that detailed emerging trends in video, television, and early computing. Its pages burst with enthusiasm—there are guides for creating neighborhood documentaries, comedic recipes for ‘video rabbit,’ and calls for new ‘information economies’ meant to liberate data from private ownership. In an article for Rhizome, artist Phyllis Segura (then Gershuny, co-founder with Beryl Korot) writes, ‘the underlying circumstances that led to Radical Software… [were] curiosity and confinement.’ Sound familiar?”

Spotted on Reddit: ProRodeo Sports News Archive

Spotted on Reddit and one of the more random things I’ve found lately: an emerging archive of ProRodeo Sports News, which is apparently a publication of the Professional Rodeo Cowboy’s Association. Issues are still being uploaded, and the archive is held at a Box.com site with issues organized into folders by year. Each issue is a single PDF file, looks like.

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive

Pitchfork: Every Issue of Punk Planet Is Available on the Internet Archive. “You can now read all 80 issues of Punk Planet for free on the Internet Archive. Founded by writer and editor Dan Sinker, the Chicago music and politics zine ran as a print publication from 1994 until 2007. In addition to music features and reviews, Punk Planet covered topics like feminism, politics, human rights, and labor. Issues included interviews with Sleater-Kinney, Nick Cave, Ralph Nader, and countless other cultural icons.”