Charged: Google News is broken

Charged: Google News is broken. “There’s been a lot of discussion about the future of publishing over the last few years, particularly as Facebook traffic began cratering, leaving publishers scrambling to find new sources of traffic. What’s never really discussed, however, is how those platforms work, and how news sources end up getting mountains of traffic from them, let alone approved for them in the first place.”

London School of Economics and Political Science: Announcing LSE Press – a new open access publishing platform for the social sciences

London School of Economics and Political Science: Announcing LSE Press – a new open access publishing platform for the social sciences. “Today marks the official launch of LSE Press, the School’s new open access publishing platform. LSE Press will provide a platform for high-quality research in the social sciences, and – in line with LSE’s aim to lead in international, interdisciplinary, issue-oriented social science – will support the launch and development of academic-led publications that are innovative in their format, content, and reach. The Press platform is provided in partnership with Ubiquity Press.”

Handelsblatt: German publishers cozy up to weather social media storm

Handelsblatt: German publishers cozy up to weather social media storm. “Seven of Germany’s largest publishers unveiled a new powerhouse alliance that they hope will bolster print media against the growing dominance of social media. Three of Germany’s three largest media groups — Burda, Bauer and Funke Group — have joined forces with other well-known imprints such as Axel Springer and Spiegel Publishing, behind the investigative magazine Der Spiegel, in what’s being called a ‘publishers coalition’.”

Times Higher Education: Publisher drops plan to charge extra for old papers after outcry

Times Higher Education: Publisher drops plan to charge extra for old papers after outcry. “Publisher Taylor & Francis has dropped plans to charge extra for access to older research papers online, after more than 110 universities signed a letter of protest. The latest renewal of UK universities’ deal with Taylor & Francis, which was agreed in principle at the end of January but is yet to be signed, for the first time covered papers published only in the past 20 years.” It gets worse. Read the whole article.

Facebook will ‘completely deprioritize publishers’: Confessions of a publisher audience development head (Digiday)

Digiday: Facebook will ‘completely deprioritize publishers’: Confessions of a publisher audience development head. “Many of the publishers that spent 2016 and 2017 investing in Facebook products like Instant Articles and news feed videos enter the new year with new perspective on the relationship they have with the world’s largest social platform. For the latest installment of our Confessions series, in which we exchange anonymity for candor, we spoke to an audience development head at a midsize digital publisher that resisted the temptation to go all-in on those products. The conversation has been condensed.” Please don’t tell me you’re shocked by this.

The Verge: Google will stop letting sites use AMP format to bait and switch readers

The Verge: Google will stop letting sites use AMP format to bait and switch readers. “Google today announced a forthcoming update to its Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP, web format that aims to discourage website owners from misusing the service. The company says that, starting in February 2018, AMP pages must contain content nearly identical to that of the standard page they’re replicating.”

Wonkhe: A beginner’s guide to Open Access

Wonkhe: A beginner’s guide to Open Access. “If Sci-Hub steals from the pockets of academic publishers, where do the contents of said pockets come from? Some argue that academic publishing provides a valuable service to researchers – signalling consensus, supporting peer review and maintaining high standards. Others would suggest that they profit from reviewing and editorial work carried out – largely or wholly unpaid – by academics, and an increasing compulsion to publish early and often.”