PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion. “Over a decade ago when a scientist published a new paper the only people who would read it were your colleagues in the field, undergraduates writing a literature review and the family you proudly emailed it to. Now, social media lets us share our publications and achievements to even more people. We also have the opportunity to make connections and start collaborations that might not have happened otherwise. Social media can be an incredible resource for a scientist who wants to spread their work, network and become a member of the scientific community.”

EUToday: Danish bill will require tech giants Facebook & Google to pay for media content

EUToday: Danish bill will require tech giants Facebook & Google to pay for media content. “Denmark looks set to follow Australia by making tech giants such as Facebook and Google pay for content published by media organisations on their platform, says Denmark’s minister for culture. Joy Mogensen said on Friday that she would put forward a bill next month which would require tech companies to pay publishers if news content is posted on their websites.”

Fast Company: Facebook has banned Australian news, but there’s a workaround

Fast Company: Facebook has banned Australian news, but there’s a workaround. “It’s unlikely that the news ban will last forever, at least in its current form….But in the meantime, Facebook users are stuck without a way to share reliable information on the world’s largest social media platform. That’s not ideal, given how easily misinformation can flourish on Facebook instead. Fortunately, there is a workaround.”

Nature: Hundreds of ‘predatory’ journals indexed on leading scholarly database

Nature: Hundreds of ‘predatory’ journals indexed on leading scholarly database. “The widely used academic database Scopus hosts papers from more than 300 potentially ‘predatory’ journals that have questionable publishing practices, an analysis has found1. Together, these titles contributed more than 160,000 articles over three years — almost 3% of the studies indexed on Scopus during the period. Their presence on Scopus and other popular research databases raises concerns that poor-quality studies could mislead scientists and pollute the scientific literature.”

New York Times: How Getting Canceled on Social Media Can Derail a Book Deal

New York Times: How Getting Canceled on Social Media Can Derail a Book Deal. “Simon & Schuster invoked part of its contract typically referred to as a morals clause, which allows a publisher to drop a book if the author does something that is likely to seriously damage sales. Widely detested by agents and authors, these clauses have become commonplace in mainstream publishing over the last few years. The clauses are rarely used to sever a relationship, but at a time when an online posting can wreak havoc on a writer’s reputation, most major publishing houses have come to insist upon them.”

TechCrunch: Google inks agreement in France on paying publishers for news reuse

TechCrunch: Google inks agreement in France on paying publishers for news reuse. “Google has reached an agreement with an association of French publishers over how it will be pay for reuse of snippets of their content. This is a result of application of a ‘neighbouring right’ for news which was transposed into national law following a pan-EU copyright reform agreed back in 2019. The tech giant had sought to evade paying French publishers for reuse of snippets of content in its news aggregation and search products by no longer displaying them in the country.”

Internet Archive: More than 100 years of Editor & Publisher Now Fully Accessible Online on the Internet Archive

Internet Archive: More than 100 years of Editor & Publisher Now Fully Accessible Online on the Internet Archive. “When Mike Blinder acquired Editor & Publisher magazine in October 2019, he inherited boxes of back issues that he put in a climate-controlled storage unit near his home in Tampa, Florida…. When Blinder called Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive and found out we had the microfilm for his back issues, he was very excited to find the microfilm was not only safe, but that the Internet Archive would digitize all of the issues at no cost to him. Blinder enthusiastically gave permission for the full 100-year history to be read and downloaded by anyone, anywhere – along with E&P’s International Yearbook and Market Guide.”

The Guardian: ‘It’s been a rollercoaster’: how indie publishers survived – and thrived – in 2020

The Guardian: ‘It’s been a rollercoaster’: how indie publishers survived – and thrived – in 2020. “Six months ago, independent publishers Jacaranda and Knights Of were warning publicly that their income had fallen to almost zero. They weren’t the only small publishers struggling. With bookshops and distributors closing, a survey from the Bookseller at the time found that almost 60% of small publishers feared closure by the autumn. No bookshops meant no knowledgeable, passionate booksellers pressing new books they loved on to customers; no events and no travel meant that crucial avenues for introducing new writers had disappeared.”

New York Times: Why on Earth Is Someone Stealing Unpublished Book Manuscripts?

New York Times: Why on Earth Is Someone Stealing Unpublished Book Manuscripts?. “It isn’t clear who the thief or thieves are, or even how they might profit from the scheme. High-profile authors like Margaret Atwood and Ian McEwan have been targeted, along with celebrities like Ethan Hawke. But short story collections and works by little-known debut writers have been attacked as well, even though they would have no obvious value on the black market. In fact, the manuscripts do not appear to wind up on the black market at all, or anywhere on the dark web, and no ransoms have been demanded. When copies of the manuscripts get out, they just seem to vanish. So why is this happening?”

Nature: Hundreds of journals’ editorial practices captured in database

Nature: Hundreds of journals’ editorial practices captured in database. “Funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development, and created with the Leiden Centre for Science and Technology Studies, the platform currently hosts a database of 387 journals. It evaluates these journals’ peer-review procedures according to 12 criteria, including: the level of anonymity afforded to authors and reviewers; the use of digital tools such as plagiarism scanners; and the timing of peer review in the research and publication process (see S. P. J. M. Horbach and W. Halffman Scientometrics 118, 339–373; 2019). The platform displays the procedures used by each journal, along with aggregate statistics on the various editorial practices.”