Techdirt: Political Consultant Misrepresents Nearly Everything In Arguing That The Gov’t Should Make Google/Facebook Pay News Orgs

Techdirt: Political Consultant Misrepresents Nearly Everything In Arguing That The Gov’t Should Make Google/Facebook Pay News Orgs. “If you don’t know who Doug Schoen is, he’s a quintessential political/lobbying insider, who has worked for the Clintons and more recently for Mike Bloomberg’s presidential campaign. It might surprise some people to find that he also was a regular on Fox News… before switching to propaganda purveyor Newsmax, where he was hired earlier this year as an ‘analyst.’… He has penned a truly facts-optional op-ed for The Hill to argue that it is imperative for the government to force Google and Facebook to pay news organizations (presumably including his employer, Newsmax — though The Hill fails to note Schoen’s affiliation with Newsmax).”

Pandemic fiction: Fall books include stories of the virus (WRAL)

WRAL: Pandemic fiction: Fall books include stories of the virus . “From wars to plagues to the Sept. 11 attacks, the literary response to historic tragedies has been a process of absorbing trauma — often beginning with poetry and nonfiction and, after months or years, expanding to narrative fiction. The pandemic has now lasted into a second fall season for publishing, and a growing number of authors, among them Picoult, Louise Erdrich, Gary Shteyngart and Hilma Wolitzer, have worked it into their latest books.”

Publishers Weekly: Internet Archive Seeking 10 Years of Publisher Sales Data for Its Fair Use Defense

Publishers Weekly: Internet Archive Seeking 10 Years of Publisher Sales Data for Its Fair Use Defense. “In an August 9 filing, IA attorneys told the court it is seeking monthly sales data for all books in print by the four plaintiff publishers (Hachette, Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, and Wiley) dating back to 2011. But the publishers, IA lawyers told the court, have balked at the sweeping request reportedly countering that the request is well beyond what the case calls for.”

University of Chicago: Mapping Yiddishland

From Jonah Lubin at the University of Chicago: Mapping Yiddishland. “This is a map is made from the bibliographic data of the ca. 13,000 texts in the Yiddish Book Center’s digital collection. Click the slider and use arrow keys or type to choose a year and see where in the world Yiddish literature was being published then. For more information, see the bibliography, which is sorted by location.”

Search Engine Land: Google tries to answer publishers questions on visibility concerns in Google News

From Search Engine Land, an explanation as to why Google News has turned into a tire fire: Google tries to answer publishers questions on visibility concerns in Google News. “For the past couple of years, ever since Google launched the new Google News Publisher Center in December 2019, Google discontinued the application process to appear in these Google News. Before December 2019, publishers would fill out a form to apply to be in Google News. You would then get an email accepting your application or rejecting it, you were in Google News or out. That changed after December 2019 when Google changed the process to be completely automated, without human intervention.”

NiemanLab: The U.S. Media Index database shows news consumers who owns what

NiemanLab: The U.S. Media Index database shows news consumers who owns what. “If you ever wanted to track down who owns a news outlet, it’s now much easier to do it. The U.S. Media Index database by the Future of Media Project has done the grueling work of compiling that information for us. The databases includes three indices: The U.S. Mainstream Media Index details the 176 parent companies of daily news outlets; the index of emerging nonprofit media and donors lists 231 nonprofit news outlets and who funds them; and an index of the seven owners of daily newspapers is categorized by state.”

Livemint: News channels body asks Google to compensate for content

Livemint: News channels body asks Google to compensate for content. “After the Indian Newspaper Society, the News Broadcasters Association (NBA) has written to Internet giant Google on revenue sharing with intermediary technology platforms while seeking a meeting to discuss the ‘urgent need to create an equitable relationship and level the playing field between global tech monopolies and traditional media/news organisations.’”

MIT News: The MIT Press launches Direct to Open

MIT News: The MIT Press launches Direct to Open. “The MIT Press has announced the launch of Direct to Open (D2O). A first-of-its-kind sustainable framework for open-access monographs, D2O moves professional and scholarly books from a solely market-based, purchase model where individuals and libraries buy single e-books to a collaborative, library-supported open-access model…. Beginning in 2022, all new MIT Press scholarly monographs and edited collections will be openly available on the MIT Press Direct e-book platform. Instead of purchasing a title once for a single collection, libraries now have the opportunity to fund them one time for the world through participant fees.”

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion

PLOS Blogs-ECR Community: Three reasons to use social media for scientific self-promotion. “Over a decade ago when a scientist published a new paper the only people who would read it were your colleagues in the field, undergraduates writing a literature review and the family you proudly emailed it to. Now, social media lets us share our publications and achievements to even more people. We also have the opportunity to make connections and start collaborations that might not have happened otherwise. Social media can be an incredible resource for a scientist who wants to spread their work, network and become a member of the scientific community.”

EUToday: Danish bill will require tech giants Facebook & Google to pay for media content

EUToday: Danish bill will require tech giants Facebook & Google to pay for media content. “Denmark looks set to follow Australia by making tech giants such as Facebook and Google pay for content published by media organisations on their platform, says Denmark’s minister for culture. Joy Mogensen said on Friday that she would put forward a bill next month which would require tech companies to pay publishers if news content is posted on their websites.”