Caltech: Conventional Computers Can Learn to Solve Tricky Quantum Problems

Caltech: Conventional Computers Can Learn to Solve Tricky Quantum Problems. “A new Caltech-led study in the journal Science describes how machine learning tools, run on classical computers, can be used to make predictions about quantum systems and thus help researchers solve some of the trickiest physics and chemistry problems. While this notion has been proposed before, the new report is the first to mathematically prove that the method works in problems that no traditional algorithms could solve.”

Harvard Gazette: New research alliance brings quantum internet closer to reality

Harvard Gazette: New research alliance brings quantum internet closer to reality. “Harvard University and Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Monday launched a strategic alliance to advance fundamental research and innovation in quantum networking. This effort provides significant funding for faculty-led research at Harvard and will build capacity for student recruitment, training, outreach, and workforce development in this key emerging technology field.”

CISA: Action required now to prepare for quantum computing cyber threats (ZDNet)

ZDNet: CISA: Action required now to prepare for quantum computing cyber threats. “Action must be taken now to help protect networks from cybersecurity threats that will emerge in the advent of power of quantum computing, the US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has warned. While quantum computing could bring benefits to computing and society, it also brings new cybersecurity threats – and the CISA alert warns that critical infrastructure in particular is at risk.”

TechCrunch: Google’s ‘quantum supremacy’ usurped by researchers using ordinary supercomputer

TechCrunch: Google’s ‘quantum supremacy’ usurped by researchers using ordinary supercomputer. “To be clear, no one is saying Google lied or misrepresented its work — the painstaking and groundbreaking research that led to the quantum supremacy announcement in 2019 is still hugely important. But if this new paper is correct, the classical versus quantum computing competition is still anybody’s game. You can read the full story of how Google took quantum from theory to reality in the original article, but here’s the very short version. Quantum computers like Sycamore are not better than classical computers at anything yet, with the possible exception of one task: simulating a quantum computer.”

Google Blog: Our new Quantum Virtual Machine will accelerate research and help people learn quantum computing

Google Blog: Our new Quantum Virtual Machine will accelerate research and help people learn quantum computing. “At Google Quantum AI, we have a long history of making tools we build for our own research available to the public free of cost. Today we are adding the Quantum Virtual Machine to the list. The Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM) emulates the experience and results of programming one of the quantum computers in our lab, from circuit validation to processor infidelity.”

Ars Technica: The cryptopocalypse is nigh! NIST rolls out new encryption standards to prepare

Ars Technica: The cryptopocalypse is nigh! NIST rolls out new encryption standards to prepare. “In the not-too-distant future—as little as a decade, perhaps, nobody knows exactly how long—the cryptography protecting your bank transactions, chat messages, and medical records from prying eyes is going to break spectacularly with the advent of quantum computing. On Tuesday, a US government agency named four replacement encryption schemes to head off this cryptopocalypse.”

FedTech: Where Is Quantum Technology Going in the Federal Government?

FedTech: Where Is Quantum Technology Going in the Federal Government?. “According to federal data, the U.S. budget for QIS [Quantum Information Science] research and development was roughly $900 million in fiscal 2022. That’s approximately double what the U.S. spent in this area in fiscal 2019, according to a report by the National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science.”

NewsWise: Rensselaer Announces Institute for Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Computing

NewsWise: Rensselaer Announces Institute for Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Computing. “The goal of the Institute is to become the primary academic center in the country for advancing new computational paradigms, including those that are a hybrid of conventional, neuromorphic, and quantum computing — combining bits, neurons, and qubits, which will make it possible to solve problems that current computing systems cannot. The new institute will allow Rensselaer to innovate using quantum computing and edge computing for networks and cyber-physical systems, and hacker-proof quantum communications.”

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global. “The Australian National University’s (ANU) ANU Quantum Numbers (AQN) is the world’s most popular and powerful online random number generator. It uses quantum technology to generate true random numbers at high speed and in real time by measuring the quantum fluctuations of the vacuum. From today, AQN will be available on AWS Marketplace, an online software store that helps customers find, buy, and use software that runs on Amazon Web Services (AWS), an Amazon.com company.”

The Next Web: Alphabet to spin out quantum company after Google’s time crystal breakthrough

The Next Web: Alphabet to spin out quantum company after Google’s time crystal breakthrough. “Business Insider reports that Alphabet is planning to spinout Sandbox Technology Inc., a quantum company it’s been incubating as part of its Moonshot ventures program. The BI report makes it seem like a done deal, which would mean Sandbox is set to exist alongside fellow sister companies in Google, Deep Mind, and more.”