ZDNet: IBM’s new tool lets developers add quantum-computing power to machine learning

ZDNet: IBM’s new tool lets developers add quantum-computing power to machine learning. “IBM is releasing a new module as part of its open-source quantum software development kit, Qiskit, to let developers leverage the capabilities of quantum computers to improve the quality of their machine-learning models. Qiskit Machine Learning is now available and includes the computational building blocks that are necessary to bring machine-learning models into the quantum space.”

Quantum computing: IBM’s new tool lets users design quantum chips in minutes (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Quantum computing: IBM’s new tool lets users design quantum chips in minutes. “Building the hardware that underpins quantum computers might not sound like everybody’s cup of tea, but IBM is determined to make the idea sound less challenging. The company has announced the general availability of Qiskit Metal, an open-source platform that automates parts of the design process for quantum chips, and which IBM promised will now let ‘anyone’ design quantum hardware.”

HPC Wire: Sandia Announces Rare Open-Access Quantum Computer Now Operational

HPC Wire: Sandia Announces Rare Open-Access Quantum Computer Now Operational. “Quantum computers are poised to become major technological drivers over the coming decades. But to get there, scientists need to experiment with quantum machines that relatively few universities or companies have. Now, scientists can use Sandia’s QSCOUT for research that might not be possible at their home institutions, without the cost or restrictions of using a commercial testbed.”

Purdue University: Creating a new type of computing that’s ‘naturally probabilistic’

Purdue University: Creating a new type of computing that’s ‘naturally probabilistic’. “‘You see, nature is unpredictable. How do you expect to predict it with a computer?’ said American physicist Richard Feynman before computer scientists at a conference in 1981. Forty years later, Purdue University engineers are building the kind of system that Feynman imagined would overcome the limitations of today’s classical computers by more closely acting like nature: a ‘probabilistic computer.’”

CNET: Quantum computer makers like their odds for big progress

CNET: Quantum computer makers like their odds for big progress. “At the Q2B conference this month, quantum computer makers Google, IBM, Honeywell, IonQ and Xanadu detailed specific steps they expect by 2024 that will push their machines further down the road of commercial practicality. Those achievements include increasing quantum computers’ scale, performance and reliability. Private sector spending on quantum computing products and services will likely more than triple to $830 million in 2024, up from $250 million in 2019, according to a forecast from Hyperion Research.”

University of Helsinki: New on­line plat­form lets any­one ex­plore and learn about quantum technology

University of Helsinki: New on­line plat­form lets any­one ex­plore and learn about quantum technology. “QPlayLearn is a free online platform that lets anyone explore the concepts behind quantum technology, developed by researchers at the Universities of Turku and Helsinki, and Aalto University, supported by IBM and other partners. Our mission is to provide multi-level education on quantum science and technologies to everyone, regardless of their age and background. We use innovative interactive tools to make the learning process more effective and fun, and accessible at different levels, without giving away scientific correctness.”

Scientific American: Light-Based Quantum Computer Exceeds Fastest Classical Supercomputers

Scientific American: Light-Based Quantum Computer Exceeds Fastest Classical Supercomputers. “For the first time, a quantum computer made from photons—particles of light—has outperformed even the fastest classical supercomputers. Physicists led by Chao-Yang Lu and Jian-Wei Pan of the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Shanghai performed a technique called Gaussian boson sampling with their quantum computer, named Jiŭzhāng. The result, reported in the journal Science, was 76 detected photons—far above and beyond the previous record of five detected photons and the capabilities of classical supercomputers.”

Google It: Quantum Chemistry Problem Solved (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Google It: Quantum Chemistry Problem Solved. “We are a bit closer to an era where quantum computers will provide answers to questions too difficult for conventional computers, according to new research featured on the cover of the journal Science. A large research team that included Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) quantum computing pioneer Nathan Wiebe and colleagues at Google AI Quantum published the proof-of-concept for quantum computing of tough chemistry problems.”

EurekAlert: A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers

EurekAlert: A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers. “Even quantum computers make mistakes. Their computing ability is extraordinary; indeed, it exceeds that of classical computers by far. This is because circuits in quantum computers are based on qubits that can represent not only 0s or 1s, but also superpositions of 0 and 1 states by using the principles of quantum mechanics. Despite their great potential, qubits are extremely fragile and prone to errors due to the interactions with the external environment.”

Purdue University: New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms

Purdue University: New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms. “The new theory, described in a paper published in the journal Advanced Quantum Technologies, is the first known attempt to determine which quantum states can be created and processed with an acceptable number of quantum gates to outperform a classical algorithm. Physicists refer to this concept of having the right number of gates to control each state as ‘complexity.’ Since the complexity of a quantum algorithm is closely related to the complexity of quantum states involved in the algorithm, the theory could therefore bring order to the search for quantum algorithms by characterizing which quantum states meet that complexity criteria.”

DOE unveils blueprint for quantum internet at ‘Launch To The Future: Quantum Internet’ (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: DOE unveils blueprint for quantum internet at ‘Launch To The Future: Quantum Internet’. “In a press conference today at the University of Chicago, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled a report that lays out a blueprint strategy for the development of a national quantum internet, bringing the United States to the forefront of the global quantum race and ushering in a new era of communications. This report provides a pathway to ensure the development of the National Quantum Initiative Act, which was signed into law by President Trump in December 2018.”

Scientific American: The Quantum App Store Is Coming

Scientific American: The Quantum App Store Is Coming. “Currently, quantum computing researchers and enthusiasts need to know quantum programming; it’s simply a must. Soon, though, all they will need is a quantum app store and a line of code. Not an app store like in your smartphone, but similar to a code repository of today, such as GitHub—a type of digital library where software developers make the code they have written available to anyone. And in the near future, developers will be able to put in their lines of code that will call on quantum computers to deal with specific tasks a regular computer can’t.”

PC Gamer: IBM and Google battle for quantum supremacy in computing

PC Gamer: IBM and Google battle for quantum supremacy in computing. “This month we need to deal with a big concept: quantum supremacy. Not the story of a subatomic particle trained as the CIA’s ultimate assassin but now suffering amnesia and uncovering a conspiracy. No, it’s the idea that a quantum computer might be able to solve some task that a classical computer cannot, or at least couldn’t do within the remaining lifespan of the universe.”