TechCrunch: Google’s ‘quantum supremacy’ usurped by researchers using ordinary supercomputer

TechCrunch: Google’s ‘quantum supremacy’ usurped by researchers using ordinary supercomputer. “To be clear, no one is saying Google lied or misrepresented its work — the painstaking and groundbreaking research that led to the quantum supremacy announcement in 2019 is still hugely important. But if this new paper is correct, the classical versus quantum computing competition is still anybody’s game. You can read the full story of how Google took quantum from theory to reality in the original article, but here’s the very short version. Quantum computers like Sycamore are not better than classical computers at anything yet, with the possible exception of one task: simulating a quantum computer.”

Google Blog: Our new Quantum Virtual Machine will accelerate research and help people learn quantum computing

Google Blog: Our new Quantum Virtual Machine will accelerate research and help people learn quantum computing. “At Google Quantum AI, we have a long history of making tools we build for our own research available to the public free of cost. Today we are adding the Quantum Virtual Machine to the list. The Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM) emulates the experience and results of programming one of the quantum computers in our lab, from circuit validation to processor infidelity.”

FedTech: Where Is Quantum Technology Going in the Federal Government?

FedTech: Where Is Quantum Technology Going in the Federal Government?. “According to federal data, the U.S. budget for QIS [Quantum Information Science] research and development was roughly $900 million in fiscal 2022. That’s approximately double what the U.S. spent in this area in fiscal 2019, according to a report by the National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science.”

NewsWise: Rensselaer Announces Institute for Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Computing

NewsWise: Rensselaer Announces Institute for Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Computing. “The goal of the Institute is to become the primary academic center in the country for advancing new computational paradigms, including those that are a hybrid of conventional, neuromorphic, and quantum computing — combining bits, neurons, and qubits, which will make it possible to solve problems that current computing systems cannot. The new institute will allow Rensselaer to innovate using quantum computing and edge computing for networks and cyber-physical systems, and hacker-proof quantum communications.”

The Next Web: Alphabet to spin out quantum company after Google’s time crystal breakthrough

The Next Web: Alphabet to spin out quantum company after Google’s time crystal breakthrough. “Business Insider reports that Alphabet is planning to spinout Sandbox Technology Inc., a quantum company it’s been incubating as part of its Moonshot ventures program. The BI report makes it seem like a done deal, which would mean Sandbox is set to exist alongside fellow sister companies in Google, Deep Mind, and more.”

Stanford University: Stanford physicists help create time crystals with quantum computers

Stanford University: Stanford physicists help create time crystals with quantum computers. “Just as a crystal’s structure repeats in space, a time crystal repeats in time and, importantly, does so infinitely and without any further input of energy – like a clock that runs forever without any batteries. The quest to realize this phase of matter has been a longstanding challenge in theory and experiment – one that has now finally come to fruition.”

The Next Web: IBM achieves true ‘quantum supremacy’ with most powerful computer ever built

The Next Web: IBM achieves true ‘quantum supremacy’ with most powerful computer ever built. “Healthy skepticism: We’re not sure exactly what Eagle does. Modern quantum computers usually solve bespoke problems that have little-to-no impact on society. This is because the technology is in its infancy. The point of building a quantum computer, today, is to see how far we can push this rudimentary technology on our way towards a simple goal: quantum supremacy.”

MIT Technology Review: Hackers are stealing data today so quantum computers can crack it in a decade

MIT Technology Review: Hackers are stealing data today so quantum computers can crack it in a decade. “While they wrestle with the immediate danger posed by hackers today, US government officials are preparing for another, longer-term threat: attackers who are collecting sensitive, encrypted data now in the hope that they’ll be able to unlock it at some point in the future. The threat comes from quantum computers, which work very differently from the classical computers we use today.”

EurekAlert: UVA research group opens a path toward quantum computing in real-world conditions

EurekAlert: UVA research group opens a path toward quantum computing in real-world conditions. “A research team led by Xu Yi, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science, has carved a niche in the physics and applications of photonic devices, which detect and shape light for a wide range of uses including communications and computing. His research group has created a scalable quantum computing platform, which drastically reduces the number of devices needed to achieve quantum speed, on a photonic chip the size of a penny.”