Google It: Quantum Chemistry Problem Solved (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Google It: Quantum Chemistry Problem Solved. “We are a bit closer to an era where quantum computers will provide answers to questions too difficult for conventional computers, according to new research featured on the cover of the journal Science. A large research team that included Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) quantum computing pioneer Nathan Wiebe and colleagues at Google AI Quantum published the proof-of-concept for quantum computing of tough chemistry problems.”

EurekAlert: A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers

EurekAlert: A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers. “Even quantum computers make mistakes. Their computing ability is extraordinary; indeed, it exceeds that of classical computers by far. This is because circuits in quantum computers are based on qubits that can represent not only 0s or 1s, but also superpositions of 0 and 1 states by using the principles of quantum mechanics. Despite their great potential, qubits are extremely fragile and prone to errors due to the interactions with the external environment.”

Purdue University: New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms

Purdue University: New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms. “The new theory, described in a paper published in the journal Advanced Quantum Technologies, is the first known attempt to determine which quantum states can be created and processed with an acceptable number of quantum gates to outperform a classical algorithm. Physicists refer to this concept of having the right number of gates to control each state as ‘complexity.’ Since the complexity of a quantum algorithm is closely related to the complexity of quantum states involved in the algorithm, the theory could therefore bring order to the search for quantum algorithms by characterizing which quantum states meet that complexity criteria.”

Scientific American: The Quantum App Store Is Coming

Scientific American: The Quantum App Store Is Coming. “Currently, quantum computing researchers and enthusiasts need to know quantum programming; it’s simply a must. Soon, though, all they will need is a quantum app store and a line of code. Not an app store like in your smartphone, but similar to a code repository of today, such as GitHub—a type of digital library where software developers make the code they have written available to anyone. And in the near future, developers will be able to put in their lines of code that will call on quantum computers to deal with specific tasks a regular computer can’t.”

PC Gamer: IBM and Google battle for quantum supremacy in computing

PC Gamer: IBM and Google battle for quantum supremacy in computing. “This month we need to deal with a big concept: quantum supremacy. Not the story of a subatomic particle trained as the CIA’s ultimate assassin but now suffering amnesia and uncovering a conspiracy. No, it’s the idea that a quantum computer might be able to solve some task that a classical computer cannot, or at least couldn’t do within the remaining lifespan of the universe.”

Phys .org: Scientists break Google’s quantum algorithm

Phys .org: Scientists break Google’s quantum algorithm. “The celebrated approach taken by Google in QAOA has sparked vast commercial interest and ignited a global research community to explore novel applications. Yet, little is known about the ultimate performance limitations of Google’s QAOA algorithm. A team of scientists from Skoltech’s Deep Quantum Laboratory took up this contemporary challenge. The all-Skoltech team led by Prof. Jacob Biamonte discovered and quantified what appears to be a fundamental limitation in the widely adopted approach initiated by Google.”

TechCrunch: Honeywell says it will soon launch the world’s most powerful quantum computer

TechCrunch: Honeywell says it will soon launch the world’s most powerful quantum computer. “‘The best-kept secret in quantum computing.’ That’s what Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) CEO Ilyas Khan called Honeywell‘s efforts in building the world’s most powerful quantum computer. In a race where most of the major players are vying for attention, Honeywell has quietly worked on its efforts for the last few years (and under strict NDA’s, it seems). But today, the company announced a major breakthrough that it claims will allow it to launch the world’s most powerful quantum computer within the next three months.”

University of Notre Dame: Quantum Interest

University of Notre Dame: Quantum Interest. “Published in Switzerland in the 1970s and 1980s, Epistemological Letters was a critical venue for work that was viewed as marginal by mainstream physicists of the era — work that would later contribute to important developments in areas such as quantum computing, quantum encryption and quantum teleportation. Think a Reddit for theoretical physicists.”

Phys .org: Short story collection to entangle readers in the quantum world

Phys .org: Short story collection to entangle readers in the quantum world. “Are you ready to get entangled in the science of the very small? That’s the thread running through a new anthology, Quantum Shorts: Collected Flash Fiction Inspired by Quantum Physics. Available to download as a free e-book now, the anthology presents 37 stories shortlisted in three editions of the international Quantum Shorts competition.”

Ars Technica: Quantum computing’s also-rans and their fatal flaws

Ars Technica: Quantum computing’s also-rans and their fatal flaws. “Last month, Google claimed to have achieved quantum supremacy—the overblown name given to the step of proving quantum computers can deliver something that a classical computer can’t. That claim is still a bit controversial, so it may yet turn out that we need a better demonstration.”

Wired: IBM Says Google’s Quantum Leap Was a Quantum Flop

Wired: IBM Says Google’s Quantum Leap Was a Quantum Flop . “Monday, Big Blue’s quantum PhDs said Google’s claim of quantum supremacy was flawed. IBM said Google had essentially rigged the race by not tapping the full power of modern supercomputers. ‘This threshold has not been met,’ IBM’s blog post says. Google declined to comment.”

CNET: Google reportedly attains ‘quantum supremacy’

CNET: Google reportedly attains ‘quantum supremacy’ . “Google has reportedly built a quantum computer more powerful than the world’s top supercomputers. A Google research paper was temporarily posted online this week, the Financial Times reported Friday, and said the quantum computer’s processor allowed a calculation to be performed in just over 3 minutes. That calculation would take 10,000 years on IBM’s Summit, the world’s most powerful commercial computer, Google reportedly said.”

Science Blog: ‘Poor Man’s Qubit’ Can Solve Quantum Problems Without Going Quantum

ScienceBlog: ‘Poor Man’s Qubit’ Can Solve Quantum Problems Without Going Quantum. “It may still be decades before quantum computers are ready to solve problems that today’s classical computers aren’t fast or efficient enough to solve, but the emerging ‘probabilistic computer’ could bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing.”

Gizmodo: You Won’t See Quantum Internet Coming

Gizmodo: You Won’t See Quantum Internet Coming. “Despite the fancy name, the ‘quantum internet’ won’t be some futuristic new way to navigate online. It won’t produce any mind-blowing new content, at least not for decades. The quantum internet will look more or less the same as the internet you’re using now, but scientists and cryptographers hope it could provide protection against not only theoretical threats but also those we haven’t dreamed up yet.”