Australia Covid: Arrests at anti-lockdown protests (BBC)

BBC: Australia Covid: Arrests at anti-lockdown protests. “Demonstrations have taken place in Australian cities against tight restrictions imposed to tackle a rise in Covid cases. Thousands gathered in Sydney, with smaller protests held in Melbourne and Brisbane. People chanted ‘freedom’ as they marched through the centre of Sydney. Officers said they had made 57 arrests.”

BBC: Covid rule-breaker ‘dies after exercise punishment’

BBC: Covid rule-breaker ‘dies after exercise punishment’. “A Filipino man who was found breaking quarantine rules has died after being made to do 300 squat-like exercises by police as punishment, his family said. Darren Manaog Penaredondo was allegedly stopped by officers while buying water after 1800 local time in Cavite province on Thursday. He collapsed the following day and later died.”

Fear and COVID in hotel quarantine: What it’s like flying overseas right now (CNET)

CNET: Fear and COVID in hotel quarantine: What it’s like flying overseas right now. “No one wants to travel internationally right now, especially to Australia, which has one of the toughest quarantines in the world. Yet in late December, just as the disease was peaking worldwide, I traveled to the country of my birth from New York. With a kid in tow, a trip halfway across the world would be a challenge in the best of times, but in a pandemic the hurdles were that much higher. I never envisioned spending New Year’s Eve sounding party whistles within earshot of a government guard, but that’s only one of the side effects of flying at the height of a global lockdown.”

New York Times: The U.S. Is Opening Up. For the Anxious, That Comes With a Cost.

New York Times: The U.S. Is Opening Up. For the Anxious, That Comes With a Cost.. “A new survey from the American Psychological Association found that while 47 percent of people have seen their stress rise over the pandemic, about 43 percent saw no change in stress and 7 percent felt less stress. Mental health experts said this fraction of the population found the quarantine protective, a permission slip to glide into more predictable spaces, schedules, routines and relationships. And the experts warn that while quarantine has blessed the ‘avoidance’ of social situations, the circumstances are poised to change.”

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners. “Last week, all 1.6 million residents of Daxing were banned from leaving the city, while people living in five Daxing neighborhoods where the cases were detected were ordered to remain indoors. Over the weekend, as new infections continued to soar, Daxing’s Tiangongyuan neighborhood ordered residents to move to centralized quarantine venues. Complaints quickly emerged on social media from people who had been told to leave their pets unattended at home.”

Rutgers: Researcher Developing a Tool to Gauge How Mobility Spreads a Pandemic

Rutgers: Researcher Developing a Tool to Gauge How Mobility Spreads a Pandemic. “Rutgers University–Camden mathematics professor Benedetto Piccoli is among a team of multidisciplinary researchers from three universities working to create a tool to help mayors and governors assess the impacts of different social distancing levels and travel restrictions. By showing how people move around locally, the tool could help to contain COVID-19 and aid economic recovery efforts.”

Covid: Australian Open players frustrated by hotel isolation (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Australian Open players frustrated by hotel isolation. “Several Australian Open tennis players have expressed frustration at being confined to their hotel rooms for two weeks after people on their flights tested positive for coronavirus. At least three players said they might not have gone to the tournament if the rules had been made clear to them. Organisers said the rules were clear, and the event would proceed as planned.”

News AU: Outrageous food waste in Sydney hotel quarantine revealed

News AU: Outrageous food waste in Sydney hotel quarantine revealed. “Australia’s $10 billion food waste shame extends to Sydney’s hotel quarantine system, with thousands of kilos of food being sent straight to landfill after perfectly healthy travellers check out. From bottles of water, to packets of noodles, breakfast cereals and fruit, you only need to take one glimpse at Northern Beaches mother Sarah Morris’s garage to get a grasp of the true crisis.”

The Atlantic: Sorry to Burst Your Quarantine Bubble

The Atlantic: Sorry to Burst Your Quarantine Bubble. “In theory, a bubble is meant to limit the spread of the coronavirus by trapping it in small groups of people and preventing it from jumping out. ‘The goal here with an infectious agent like SARS-CoV-2 is that you want to try and not give it hosts,’ Keri Althoff, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. ‘That’s the name of the game.’ Earlier this year, researchers modeled the best ways to flatten the curve by limiting social interactions and found that having people interact with only the same few contacts over and over again was the most effective approach. But the details of how exactly to go about podding can be hard to pin down.”

New York Times: Geek Out Over Christmas Films

New York Times: Geek Out Over Christmas Films. “Theaters would normally be packed this time of year with folks assembled to watch revered holiday films like ‘It’s a Wonderful Life,’ Frank Capra’s 1946 heart-tugger usually returns to big screens over the holidays, including an annual weeks-long run at the IFC Center in New York. But with many theaters now dark, fans in search of a more communal experience have been forced to get creative. Here are some (mostly) digital ways to expand the magic of classic Christmas cinema right.”

NPR: CDC Likely To Recommend Shortening Coronavirus Quarantine Period

NPR: CDC Likely To Recommend Shortening Coronavirus Quarantine Period. “The exact language of the new guidelines and when they might be announced remains unclear, but according to a federal official who asked not to be named because they weren’t authorized to speak publicly about the issue, the recommended quarantine time is likely to be just seven to 10 days for people who then test negative for the virus.”