Boiling Point: These maps show how air pollution and COVID-19 can be a deadly mix (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Boiling Point: These maps show how air pollution and COVID-19 can be a deadly mix. “During a news cycle dominated by COVID-19 infections spreading through the White House as President Trump and his associates flout public health guidelines, I’ve been thinking about some of the people suffering the most from this virus: Black people and Latinos, who are more likely to get sick and more likely to die than white people. I’ve also been thinking about the links between poor air quality and risk of contracting coronavirus, and the fact that people of color are more likely to breathe polluted air due to decades of racist housing and environmental policies.”

Washington Post: Crime rose unevenly when stay-at-home orders lifted. The racial disparity is the widest in years.

Washington Post: Crime rose unevenly when stay-at-home orders lifted. The racial disparity is the widest in years.. “A Washington Post analysis of 27 cities showed the rolling rate of violent crime in majority-White neighborhoods fell by 30 percent while stay-at-home orders were in effect, dipping to its lowest point in two years. Once the orders were lifted, violent crime in those neighborhoods returned to pre-pandemic levels, but stayed below average when compared with 2018 and 2019. In majority-Black neighborhoods, the rate of violence remained relatively steady while stay-at-home orders were in effect, but rose dramatically after orders were lifted, peaking at 133 crimes per 100,000 residents in July, the highest level in the past three years.”

Johns Hopkins: Johns Hopkins JustUs Dialogues will spotlight critical health and justice disparities

Johns Hopkins: Johns Hopkins JustUs Dialogues will spotlight critical health and justice disparities. “Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medicine will host a new online discussion series featuring many of the nation’s most important voices on topics relating to racial justice. The free JustUs Dialogues will kick off Thursday, Aug. 20, with a discussion on police reform and will culminate in October with an online symposium on health and restorative justice.”

NBC News: For richer and poorer, Uncle Sam’s coronavirus response widened the gulf

NBC News: For richer and poorer, Uncle Sam’s coronavirus response widened the gulf. “The government’s treatment of two businessmen — one Black, one white; one struggling, one thriving; one left to fend for himself, one supported despite no apparent need — reflects the much larger story of the federal response to the coronavirus crisis. It has pumped trillions of dollars into America’s wealthiest companies and investors, along with smaller chunks for lower- and middle-class families, in ways that reinforced and widened disparities between races and between economic classes, according to economists.”

New York Times: Virus-Driven Push to Release Juvenile Detainees Leaves Black Youth Behind

New York Times: Virus-Driven Push to Release Juvenile Detainees Leaves Black Youth Behind. “Black youth detained in juvenile justice facilities have been released at a far slower rate than their white peers in response to the coronavirus, according to a new report that also found that the gap in release rates between the two groups had nearly doubled over the course of the pandemic.”

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms. “Amid widespread job loss, reduced hours, and pay cuts, more than 12.5 million renters, like [Lacresha] Lewis, were unable to make their most recent payment, according to survey data collected last week and released by the U.S. Census Bureau Wednesday. And nearly 24 million people have little to no confidence in their ability to pay next month’s rent, Census data show. Approximately 56% of those anxious renters are Black or Latinx — the populations that are also more likely to rent, and more likely to spend a bigger portion of their income on housing. That’s while Black and Latinx people have been disproportionately harmed by the virus itself, and the resulting job loss. ”

CNN: A viral Black-owned business success and the shortcomings of the federal pandemic response

CNN: A viral Black-owned business success and the shortcomings of the federal pandemic response. “From lack of relationships to banks, to minimal or less than pristine credit histories, to something as simple as the size and structure of their businesses, Black-owned small businesses faced built-in structural disadvantages, according to lawmakers, advocates, government officials and business owners. ‘This is just laying bare all of the cracks and issues that were already there in this foundation and that people of color had been experiencing every single day,’ said Ashley Harrington, federal advocacy director and a senior counsel at the Center for Responsible Lending.”

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities. “On the homepage, users can see a snapshot of COVID-19 deaths across the country. Selecting a state brings up a map displaying COVID-19 mortality by county. Drilling down, users can select a county to see how it compares to the rest of the state and to the country in average daily cases and deaths, and in social characteristics, such as percentage of residents who are African-American, percentage who live in poverty, percentage who are obese, percentage who have diabetes, and more. The dashboard allows users to compare counties within the same state, aggregating key metrics that tell a story of a community’s social and economic health.”

NPR: How The Crisis Is Making Racial Inequality Worse

NPR Planet Money: How The Crisis Is Making Racial Inequality Worse. “COVID-19 is killing African Americans at a rate three times higher than white people. You can see the disparity on the map with places like the Bronx, the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans and the South Side of Chicago grappling with thousands of deaths from the disease. The health crisis, however, is also an economic crisis, and the virus is clobbering these communities on this front, too.”

Phys .org: Coronavirus is not the ‘great equalizer’—race matters

Phys.org: Coronavirus is not the ‘great equalizer’—race matters. “The fear and mistrust of health systems expressed by many in Black, Indigenous and racialized communities stem from historical eugenic practices of both governments and individual doctors. These communities have experienced systemic racist violence for generations. They have recently experienced xenophobic responses to COVID-19 and historically, other health crises. I have worked for over 25 years in community health and as a health scholar. I have worked with survivors of trauma who have experienced colonial violence. I am concerned how anti-Black racism, anti-Indigenous racism and other forms of intersectional violence will impact the health of our communities during this crisis.”

The Project Comedy Club Database

Another one of those things I stumbled across thanks to the Bing News RSS feed: The Project Comedy Club database. From the About page: “Project CCDB came to fruition when a few comedians in a text feed were complaining about the lack of women/POC diversity in nationwide comedy club line-ups, even in large markets like Los Angeles, where the population contains more than enough qualified (audience-drawing) comics for booking. After months of exchanging photos of predominantly white male lineups, these comics got sick of complaining about it and connected with an interested computer scientist to gather actual data from clubs over a three month period and see if the hearsay was true or just rumors of a resentful messaging group. So, here are the facts as they stand of what genders and ethnicitites are most represented.”

Detroit Free Press: Michigan’s worst ‘environmental injustice’ areas ID’d

Detroit Free Press: Michigan’s worst ‘environmental injustice’ areas ID’d. “It’s a troubling combination for many Michigan residents: daily exposure to heightened environmental risks such as air and water pollution, heavy traffic and contaminated sites, and having those conditions particularly affect the most socially vulnerable populations — the poor, less educated, sometimes with limited English language skills.”

NPR: Search The Thousands of Disaster Buyouts FEMA Didn’t Want You To See

NPR: Search The Thousands of Disaster Buyouts FEMA Didn’t Want You To See. “NPR analyzed records from a Federal Emergency Management Agency database of more than 40,000 property acquisitions, or ‘buyouts,’ funded by the agency from 1989 through 2017. The program buys homes from eligible homeowners who opt in. It then turns those lots into open space.”

Sojourners: New Database Lets You Search Racial Disparities in School Districts

Sojourners: New Database Lets You Search Racial Disparities in School Districts. “ProPublica has released a new interactive database that allows users to examine racial disparities in more than 96,000 individual public and charter schools, and 17,000 districts across the United States.”

Route Fifty: Algorithms Can’t Fix Societal Problems—And Often Amplify Them

Route Fifty: Algorithms Can’t Fix Societal Problems—And Often Amplify Them. “At research organization AI Now’s 2018 symposium in New York Tuesday, activists and artificial-intelligence researchers drove home the idea that algorithms are an insufficient Band-Aid slapped on top of deeper societal problems present in the United States.”