Northeastern University School of Law: 1,000 Racial Homicides Investigated in Unprecedented Burnham-Nobles Digital Archive

Northeastern University School of Law: 1,000 Racial Homicides Investigated in Unprecedented Burnham-Nobles Digital Archive. “The Archive brings together evidence demonstrating the extensive scale and scope of killings between 1930 and 1954 in the Jim Crow South. Many of the 1,000 cases of anti-Black killings were mishandled by local police and prosecutors or went unreported until investigated by Northeastern students in law and journalism and their faculty. Built on open-source architecture, the Archive offers users the opportunity to learn about how violence affected people’s lives, defined legal rights and shaped politics during the Jim Crow era.”

Associated Press: Rohingya seek reparations from Facebook for role in massacre

Associated Press: Rohingya seek reparations from Facebook for role in massacre. “For years, Facebook, now called Meta Platforms Inc., pushed the narrative that it was a neutral platform in Myanmar that was misused by malicious people, and that despite its efforts to remove violent and hateful material, it unfortunately fell short. That narrative echoes its response to the role it has played in other conflicts around the world, whether the 2020 election in the U.S. or hate speech in India. But a new and comprehensive report by Amnesty International states that Facebook’s preferred narrative is false.”

Tricycle: A New Monument Addresses the Erasure of Japanese American Incarceration

Tricycle: A New Monument Addresses the Erasure of Japanese American Incarceration . “At the heart of the Irei Monument is the first comprehensive and accurate list of over 125,000 names of every person of Japanese ancestry incarcerated during World War II. Now, the list will be shared with the public through three distinct, interlinking elements: a sacred book of names as monument (慰霊帳 Ireichō), an online archive as monument (慰霊蔵 Ireizō), and light sculptures as monument (慰霊碑 Ireihi).”

New York Times: Silicon Valley Slides Back Into ‘Bro’ Culture

New York Times: Silicon Valley Slides Back Into ‘Bro’ Culture. “Two parallel Silicon Valleys have emerged. There’s the ThunderDome of Twitter, where tech thought leaders collect likes by posting edgy memes and spouting flip political takes — then invoke cancel culture when they are criticized. They troll their way into impulsive $44 billion acquisitions, then back out. They promote an entirely online existence inside the so-called metaverse. Then there’s the day-to-day reality, where women still get just 2 percent of venture capital funding and Black founders get 1 percent, where the largest tech companies have made negligible progress on diversifying their staff, and where harassment and discrimination remain common.”

Rolling Stone: New Report Claims YouTube Is Cashing in on Misogyny, Racism, and Targeted Harassment

Rolling Stone: New Report Claims YouTube Is Cashing in on Misogyny, Racism, and Targeted Harassment . “In an exclusive interview, Bot Sentinel founder Christopher Bouzy tells Rolling Stone that the report uncovered a pattern of unchecked hate speech, misogyny, racism, and targeted harassment singularly focused on famous and identifiable women. The most mentioned women in the channels were Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, and actress Amber Heard, both of whom have remained extremely vocal about the long-term mental and emotional effects of targeted harassment.”

Harvard Gazette: Racial discrimination during COVID led to rise in depression

Harvard Gazette: Racial discrimination during COVID led to rise in depression. “Everyday discrimination experienced by people of racial and ethnic minority groups during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with significantly increased odds of moderate to severe depression and thoughts of suicide, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and their colleagues have found.”

Washington Post: Facebook bans hate speech but still makes money from white supremacists

Washington Post: Facebook bans hate speech but still makes money from white supremacists. “Last year, a Facebook page administrator put out a clarion call for new followers: They were looking for ‘the good ole boys and girls from the south who believe in white [supremacy].’ The page — named Southern Brotherhood — was live on Tuesday afternoon and riddled with photos of swastikas and expressions of white power. Facebook has long banned content referencing white nationalism. But a plethora of hate groups still populate the site, and the company boosts its revenue by running ads on searches for these pages.”

Mashable: It took just one weekend for Meta’s new AI Chatbot to become racist

Mashable: It took just one weekend for Meta’s new AI Chatbot to become racist. “The company’s new BlenderBot 3 AI chatbot — which was released in the U.S. just days ago on Friday, August 5 — is already making a host of false statements based on interactions it had with real humans online. Some of the more egregious among those include claims Donald Trump won the 2020 U.S. presidential election and is currently president, anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, as well as comments calling out Facebook for all of its ‘fake news.’”

UCLA Newsroom: UCLA Law launches project to track attacks on critical race theory

UCLA Newsroom: UCLA Law launches project to track attacks on critical race theory. “UCLA School of Law’s Critical Race Studies Program has created an innovative project to track and analyze legislative, regulatory and administrative efforts to block or undermine the teaching of a more complete history of the United States in schools across the country. Critical race theory, or CRT, is the study of systemic racism in law, policy and society.”

Rafu Shimpo: First National Names Monument Honoring JAs Incarcerated During WWII to Launch in Fall

Rafu Shimpo: First National Names Monument Honoring JAs Incarcerated During WWII to Launch in Fall. “With the support of a $3.4 million grant from the Mellon Foundation, the USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions and Culture is creating Irei: National Monument for the WWII Japanese American Incarceration, a multi-faceted project to address the erasure of the identities of individuals of Japanese ancestry who experienced wartime incarceration.”

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement. “[Old Lick Cemetery]’s disturbing story would likely remain a footnote in the city’s history were it not for a project called Hidden in Plain Site, the brainchild of creative agency BrownBaylor. It’s designed to resurface the lost narrative of marginalized Black people across the US with experiences you can view through a browser or virtual reality headset.”

MarketWatch: Amazon, Microsoft, McDonald’s and Citi to examine their impact on civil rights and racial equity. Will more companies follow suit?

MarketWatch: Amazon, Microsoft, McDonald’s and Citi to examine their impact on civil rights and racial equity. Will more companies follow suit?. “After years of shareholder pressure that ratcheted up after the racial reckoning in summer 2020, some of the world’s most influential companies have agreed to independent racial-equity or civil-rights audits to consider how their policies, products and practices affect the civil rights of and equality among employees, customers and society.”