Smithsonian Magazine: Researchers Develop a ‘Bear-Dar’ That Warns Humans of Approaching Polar Bears

Smithsonian Magazine: Researchers Develop a ‘Bear-Dar’ That Warns Humans of Approaching Polar Bears. “Whenever Alyssa Bohart heard a voice from her computer repeatedly chiming—status alert, status alert—the search was on. The warnings came from a radar device installed in Churchill, Manitoba—a modified military system programed with artificial intelligence (A.I.) and trained to detect polar bears. Bohart’s job was to remotely operate a camera and visually confirm that the AI was making the right call.”

WIRED: Google’s New Tech Can Read Your Body Language—Without Cameras

WIRED: Google’s New Tech Can Read Your Body Language—Without Cameras . “It sounds futuristic and perhaps more than a little invasive—a computer watching your every move? But it feels less creepy once you learn that these technologies don’t have to rely on a camera to see where you are and what you’re doing. Instead, they use radar. Google’s Advanced Technology and Products division—better known as ATAP, the department behind oddball projects such as a touch-sensitive denim jacket—has spent the past year exploring how computers can use radar to understand our needs or intentions and then react to us appropriately.”

Radar Interference Tracker: A New Open Source Tool to Locate Active Military Radar Systems (Bellingcat)

Bellingcat: Radar Interference Tracker: A New Open Source Tool to Locate Active Military Radar Systems. “The Radar Interference Tracker (RIT) is a new tool created by Ollie Ballinger that allows anyone to search for and potentially locate active military radar systems anywhere on earth. Click here to access the tool and read on for a full description of how to use it (as well as learning about the fascinating research it builds upon).”

The Verge: Google launches Ripple, an open standard that could bring tiny radars to Ford cars and more

The Verge: Google launches Ripple, an open standard that could bring tiny radars to Ford cars and more. “Google has been publicly building tiny radar chips since 2015. They can tell you how well you sleep, control a smartwatch, count sheets of paper, and let you play the world’s tiniest violin. But the company’s Soli radar hasn’t necessarily had commercial success, most prominently featuring in an ill-fated Pixel phone. Now, Google has launched an open-source API standard called Ripple that could theoretically bring the tech to additional devices outside Google — perhaps even a car, as Ford is one of the participants in the new standard.”

NoCamels: Israel Adapts Military Radar Systems For Remote COVID-19 Patient Monitoring

NoCamels: Israel Adapts Military Radar Systems For Remote COVID-19 Patient Monitoring. “The Defense Ministry’s National Emergency Team at the Directorate of Defense Research and Development (DDR&D) said this week that the two systems, developed by Israeli defense company Elbit Systems and Elta (a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries), were tested successfully under the medical supervision of doctors from the Beilinson – Rabin Medical Center. The systems use an array of radar and electro-optical sensors with which vital signs were measured and displayed on monitors for doctors in a sterile environment, allowing medical staff to avoid direct contact for risk of infection.”

Phys .org: Using artificial intelligence to track birds’ dark-of-night migrations

Phys .org: Using artificial intelligence to track birds’ dark-of-night migrations. “Now, with colleagues from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and others, senior authors Sheldon and Subhransu Maji and lead author Tsung-Yu Lin at UMass’s College of Information and Computer Sciences unveil their new tool ‘MistNet.’ In Sheldon’s words, it’s the ‘latest and greatest in machine learning’ to extract bird data from the radar record and to take advantage of the treasure trove of bird migration information in the decades-long radar data archives. The tool’s name refers to the fine, almost invisible, ‘mist nets’ that ornithologists use to capture migratory songbirds.”

Phys.org: ‘Dark ecology project’ will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrations

Phys.org: ‘Dark ecology project’ will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrations . “Every spring and fall, billions of birds migrate across the United States, largely unseen under the cover of darkness. Now a team of researchers led by computer scientist Daniel Sheldon at the University of Massachusetts Amherst plan to develop new analytic methods with data collected over the past 20 years—more than 200 million archived radar scans from the national weather radar network—to provide powerful new tools for tracking migration.”