University of Rhode Island: Iconic Pittsburgh jazz DJ donates show archives to URI music Department

University of Rhode Island: Iconic Pittsburgh jazz DJ donates show archives to URI music Department. “Calvin Stemley, a close friend of [Ronald “Butch”] Perkins, coordinated the gift of the archive from Mr. Perkins’ family to the University. On Oct. 25, he played with the URI Jazz Band and accepted a plaque on behalf of Perkins and his work as a DJ and strong supporter of jazz. Stemley is a retired music educator from Pittsburgh Public Schools and continues to perform in the Pittsburgh area where he mentors young people and teaches them about music, especially jazz.”

EurekAlert: Using AI to remix radio for people living with dementia

EurekAlert: Using AI to remix radio for people living with dementia. “Radio Me will address key causes of hospital admission for people with dementia, such as agitation and not taking medication correctly. As a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve, and people will be able to remain living independently at home for longer.”

WUSF Public Media: Massive Digitization Effort Is The Latest Plot Twist For Cuban Radio Soap Operas

WUSF Public Media: Massive Digitization Effort Is The Latest Plot Twist For Cuban Radio Soap Operas. “Binge-worthy podcasts may be a 21st century phenomenon, but addictive, serialized storytelling is nothing new. From the 1930s through the 1950s, Cuba exported more daytime and nighttime radio serials than any nation in the Spanish-speaking world — even Fidel Castro was a fan. After the Revolution, Cuban emigrés in Miami began making original Spanish-language radio soap operas — better known as radionovelas — that reportedly ran on more than 200 stations worldwide. The Latin American Library at Tulane University is now digitizing a whopping collection of those 1960s-era programs and encouraging academic study of Cold War soaps.”

The Center for the Performing Arts: NEA grant to fund media preservation project

The Center for the Performing Arts: NEA grant to fund media preservation project. “A grant from the National Endowment for the Arts will enable the Great American Songbook Foundation to digitize historic radio recordings featuring The Music Man creator Meredith Willson and make them available online for scholars worldwide. The recordings document Willson’s early career in the 1940s and ’50s, when he was a host and music director for several national radio shows, conducting ensembles like the San Francisco Symphony and talking with Hollywood and Broadway stars including Walter Pidgeon, Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Frank Loesser and Dick Powell.”

Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available. (Digital Library of Georgia)

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available.. “Atlanta journalist Boyd Lewis conceived, created, produced, and hosted Southwind, a half-hour radio program of features and documentaries on the people, issues, and events of the South. The program aired on WABE-FM in Atlanta between November 14, 1980 and January 29, 1987. The collection contains 150 out of the 177 editions that were recorded. Each of the Southwind programs consisted of one to three segments that featured original reporting either by Mr. Lewis or his colleagues in public radio throughout the Southeast. Many of the segments focused on contemporary events that Mr. Lewis placed in historical context, while other segments were retrospectives of past events that featured the voices of the participants. The segments touched upon a broad range of topics relating to the history of Atlanta and the American South in the mid-to-late 20th century, including the Civil Rights Movement; African American history; city and regional economic and cultural development in the southeast; business and labor history; Atlanta theater; folk life; literature, and political history.”

iNews: What was on TV the day you were born? Historic Radio Times listings now online through BBC Genome Project

iNews: What was on TV the day you were born? Historic Radio Times listings now online through BBC Genome Project. “What was on television the day you were born? The BBC is launching a searchable database of Radio Times programme listings dating back to 1923, through the broadcaster’s own Genome Project. The BBC has now made all 1940s issues of the Radio Times publicly available online for the first time.” The 1920s and 1930s were already available.