Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available. (Digital Library of Georgia)

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available.. “Atlanta journalist Boyd Lewis conceived, created, produced, and hosted Southwind, a half-hour radio program of features and documentaries on the people, issues, and events of the South. The program aired on WABE-FM in Atlanta between November 14, 1980 and January 29, 1987. The collection contains 150 out of the 177 editions that were recorded. Each of the Southwind programs consisted of one to three segments that featured original reporting either by Mr. Lewis or his colleagues in public radio throughout the Southeast. Many of the segments focused on contemporary events that Mr. Lewis placed in historical context, while other segments were retrospectives of past events that featured the voices of the participants. The segments touched upon a broad range of topics relating to the history of Atlanta and the American South in the mid-to-late 20th century, including the Civil Rights Movement; African American history; city and regional economic and cultural development in the southeast; business and labor history; Atlanta theater; folk life; literature, and political history.”

iNews: What was on TV the day you were born? Historic Radio Times listings now online through BBC Genome Project

iNews: What was on TV the day you were born? Historic Radio Times listings now online through BBC Genome Project. “What was on television the day you were born? The BBC is launching a searchable database of Radio Times programme listings dating back to 1923, through the broadcaster’s own Genome Project. The BBC has now made all 1940s issues of the Radio Times publicly available online for the first time.” The 1920s and 1930s were already available.

Chicago Tribune: Studs Terkel Radio Archive will be made public this week, with 5,000-plus stories that needed to be saved

Chicago Tribune: Studs Terkel Radio Archive will be made public this week, with 5,000-plus stories that needed to be saved. “I knew Studs Terkel since, actually, the day I was born. He took my father, his friend, out for a celebratory drink, or three, that long-ago day, and over the next decades, I wrote many thousands of words about him: his best-selling books, his WFMT radio show, his activism, his awards, enthusiasm and insatiable curiosity. I wrote about him when he underwent a risky open-heart procedure when he was 93 and from which he emerged saying, ‘I’m a medical miracle,’ and when he died on Halloween in 2008 at 96, I wrote his obituary. What more can there be to say? Well, I am done, actually, because when this story ends, I will stop writing about Studs and start listening to him. That will occupy a great deal of time because on Wednesday, the first 1,800 or so of the 5,600 or so hours of Studs’ remarkable radio programs will become readily available for any interested ears and minds. “

Stanford Libraries: The Stanford Media Preservation Lab begins preservation of the New Dimensions radio show

Stanford Libraries: The Stanford Media Preservation Lab begins preservation of the New Dimensions radio show. “Adi Da (Bubba Free John) was a 20th century religious leader that studied English literature at Stanford, Joseph Campbell proposed a universal narrative that is mythopoetic, and host Michael Toms interviewed the latter and the early followers of the former in the embryonic episodes of the radio show New Dimensions. While these two interviews from the 1970’s are remarkable in their own right, New Dimensions in its entirety represents the fractured search for meaning in the post-1960’s United States. “

New-to-Me: The Hip Hop Radio Archive

New to me: the Hip Hop Radio Archive. “The Hip-Hop Radio Archive aims to digitize, preserve, share, and contextualize recordings of hip-hop radio from the 1980s and 1990s from commercial, college, community, and pirate stations of all sizes, telling the stories of the shows and the people that made them…. This project’s primary purpose is to preserve the recordings that may only exist on cassettes recorded by fans in their bedrooms. There have been so many great music blogs over the last decade that relied on file sharing sites to spread classic hip-hop radio shows and while those sites are great for short-term sharing, they’re not a place where files will survive long-term. These sites and the files on them are in danger of just disappearing, erasing petabytes of content all at once. The Internet Archive is the solution: hosting by a non-profit organization that’s been around for over 20 years and is dedicated to digital preservation.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: NEH grant to reunite radio history

University of Wisconsin-Madison: NEH grant to reunite radio history. “The $217,000 grant will fund the creation of a comprehensive online collection of early educational public radio content from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. The forerunner of CPB and its arms, NPR and PBS, the NAEB served as the primary organizer, developer, and distributor for noncommercial broadcast production and analysis between 1925 and 1981. These broadcasts, mostly stemming from university- and public school-run radio stations, provide an in-depth look at the engagements and events of American history, as they were broadcast to and received by the general public in the 20th century. They document educational, political and cultural events as diverse as the national census, atomic energy, American labor, religion, United States history, agricultural engineering, mathematics and foreign relations.”

Minnesota Public Radio: MPR Reaches Agreement with Garrison Keillor to Restore Public Access to Online Archives

Minnesota Public Radio: MPR Reaches Agreement with Garrison Keillor to Restore Public Access to Online Archives. “Minnesota Public Radio has reached an agreement with Garrison Keillor to restore free public access to the online archives of A Prairie Home Companion and The Writer’s Almanac.”