Pitchfork: Radiohead’s Discography Is Now on Bandcamp

Pitchfork: Radiohead’s Discography Is Now on Bandcamp. “The majority of Radiohead’s catalog is now available on Bandcamp. Fans can listen to or purchase all nine of the band’s studio albums, the 2001 live album I Might Be Wrong, the King of Limbs remix album, 2007’s In Rainbows Disk 2, and the reissues OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 2017 and Kid A Mnesia. Find Bandcamp’s announcement below.”

Pitchfork: Radiohead Adding More Archival Concert Films to YouTube

Pitchfork: Radiohead Adding More Archival Concert Films to YouTube. “A year ago, Radiohead began adding archival concert footage to their YouTube page. The shows came from the extensive Radiohead Public Library. The series ran from April to July 2020. Now, the band is starting a second series. This Friday (April 9), a January 2008 show, performed at London’s 93 Feet East, will broadcast on YouTube. Be sure to tune in below at 3 p.m. Eastern on Friday.”

Pitchfork: Radiohead Launch Digital Holiday Cards

Pitchfork: Radiohead Launch Digital Holiday Cards. “Radiohead have launched a line of characteristically apocalyptic digital greeting cards via their online archive. The design patterns include ‘LA-LA,’ ‘LA LA,’ and ‘LAA,’ while the inner messages contain such sentiments as “Hope for the future,” ‘Everything is rosy,’ and ‘In lieu of emptiness.’ ‘This festive card is for you to make and send to acquaintances new and old,’ reads a note. ‘No element of data placed onto it will be stored by Radiohead.’”

Wired UK: Inside Radiohead’s mission to archive everything

Wired UK: Inside Radiohead’s mission to archive everything . “In January 2020, the many strange iterations of Radiohead’s multiple websites were brought back to life when the band launched the Radiohead Public Library. If you visit radiohead.com today, you’re greeted with neatly organised digital ‘shelves’, stacked with music, high-quality videos, merch and ephemera from every era of the band. Most of those preserved websites are deliberately opaque. One, from the era of The Bends (the critically acclaimed album released in 1995), collects negative reviews of the website itself on a neon background. (‘Do NOT visit this site. It is confusing, garbled rubbish,’ reads one.) But, if the Radiohead of the early 2000s found innovation in obfuscation, in 2020 the band has recognised that a truly radical online act is to actually provide clarity.”

Pitchfork: Radiohead Add Rarities to Streaming Services in Online Archive Launch

Pitchfork: Radiohead Add Rarities to Streaming Services in Online Archive Launch. “The archive groups the miscellanea by era, with thumbnails linking to ad-free videos and galleries. After creating their own library card, fans can explore the band’s catalogue, visuals, and various artefacts in a “highly curated and organised archive,” a press release notes. That includes detailed artwork, music videos, HD live and TV performances, B-sides and rarities, previously out-of-print merchandise, and the playlists band members shared around their latter-period recording sessions.”