UPI: New website allows users to track mesmerizing journey of a raindrop

UPI: New website allows users to track mesmerizing journey of a raindrop. “A Pittsburgh web developer has made a website that allows anyone to trace the path of a raindrop that falls in the contiguous United States from when it lands on the ground to its final destination and everything in between.” I played with this a little bit. If you try to zoom way in on the map of the US, it’ll slow your computer down. If you just click on the map instead of zooming, it works better.

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data. “IN MARCH 2020, as the United Kingdom went into pandemic lockdown, climate scientist Ed Hawkins put out a call to people with time on their hands: He needed help turning nearly 350 years’ worth of archival rainfall reports into digital documents that modern researchers could easily use. To his surprise, 16,000 people volunteered…. Now, just over a year later, his group has released their work, a massive data set of upwards of 5 million observations extracted from the UK Meteorological Office’s paper records—the oldest dating to 1677.”

New Data Set Provides Information on Rainfall Worldwide

A kind reader clued me to this new-to-me data set on global rainfall measurements. “The data set, called CHIRPS (short for ‘Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation With Station data’) blends data from weather stations and weather satellites with extraordinary accuracy, providing a detailed record of global rainfall stretching back more than 30 years. By making it possible to compare current rainfall patterns with historical averages at the neighborhood scale for virtually the entire world, CHIRPS provides an early warning system for drought, making it possible for development agencies, insurance companies and others to more effectively activate adaptive strategies such as food aid and insurance.”