MIT Technology Review: Ransomware did not kill a German hospital patient

MIT Technology Review: Ransomware did not kill a German hospital patient. “When a German hospital patient died in September while ransomware disrupted emergency care at the facility, police launched a negligent-homicide investigation and said they might hold the hackers responsible. The case attracted worldwide attention because it could have been the first time law enforcement considered a cyberattack to be directly responsible for a death. But after months of investigation, police now say the patient was in such poor health that she likely would have died anyway, and that the cyberattack was not responsible.”

Report: Ransomware Disables Georgia County Election Database (News18)

News18: Report: Ransomware Disables Georgia County Election Database. “A ransomware attack that hobbled a Georgia county government in early October reportedly disabled a database used to verify voter signatures in the authentication of absentee ballots. It is the first reported case of a ransomware attack affecting an election-related system in the 2020 cycle.”

BetaNews: Ransomware attacks rocket over the last quarter

BetaNews: Ransomware attacks rocket over the last quarter. “In the last three months ransomware attacks have grown by a global average of 50 percent compared to the first half of 2020. The figures look even bleaker for individual countries, with attacks up by by 98 percent in the US, 80 percent in the UK, 145 percent in Germany, 36 percent in France and 160 percent in Spain.”

BetaNews: Free tool helps security professionals improve ransomware defenses

BetaNews: Free tool helps security professionals improve ransomware defenses. “Endpoint detection and response company Nyotron is launching a new, free online tool called Ransomwiz that allows allows security professionals to check their defenses by generating actual ransomware samples using a variety of real-world attack techniques.”

Ars Technica: Patient dies after ransomware attack reroutes her to remote hospital

Ars Technica: Patient dies after ransomware attack reroutes her to remote hospital. “A woman seeking emergency treatment for a life-threatening condition died after a ransomware attack crippled a nearby hospital in Duesseldorf, Germany, and forced her to obtain services from a more distant facility, it was widely reported on Thursday.”

The Register: GCHQ agency ‘strongly urges’ Brit universities, colleges to protect themselves after spike in ransomware infections

The Register: GCHQ agency ‘strongly urges’ Brit universities, colleges to protect themselves after spike in ransomware infections. “GCHQ offshoot the National Cyber Security Centre has warned Further and Higher Education institutions in the UK to be on their guard against ransomware attacks as the new academic year (sort of) gets under way.”

The Register: Newcastle University, neighbouring Northumbria hit by ransomware attacks

The Register: Newcastle University, neighbouring Northumbria hit by ransomware attacks. “A cyber attack at Newcastle University has turned out to be a ransomware infection courtesy of the Doppelpaymer gang. Hackers have posted a small sample of files from the gang on a leaks website, a tactic increasingly used by ransomware criminals to pressure victims into paying up.”

The Register: Utes gotta be kidding me… University of Utah handed $457K to ransomware creeps

The Register: Utes gotta be kidding me… University of Utah handed $457K to ransomware creeps. “The University of Utah has admitted to handing over a six-figure pile of cash to scumbags to undo a ransomware infection during which student and staff information was stolen by hackers. The American school that gave the world science fiction author Orson Scott Card, ballistic missile designer Simon Ramo, and NBA player Keith Van Horn says that last month it paid crooks $457,059.24 to reverse an attack on the network of its College of Social and Behavioral Science.”

Associated Press: Ransomware feared as possible saboteur for November election

Associated Press: Ransomware feared as possible saboteur for November election. “Ransomware attacks targeting state and local governments have been on the rise, with cyber criminals seeking quick money by seizing data and holding it hostage until they get paid. The fear is that such attacks could affect voting systems directly or even indirectly, by infecting broader government networks that include electoral databases.”

TechCrunch: Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack, sources say

TechCrunch: Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack, sources say. “An ongoing global outage at sport and fitness tech giant Garmin was caused by a ransomware attack, according to two sources with direct knowledge of the incident. The incident began late Wednesday and continued through the weekend, causing disruption to the company’s online services for millions of users, including Garmin Connect, which syncs user activity and data to the cloud and other devices.”

ZDNet: Hacker ransoms 23k MongoDB databases and threatens to contact GDPR authorities

ZDNet: Hacker ransoms 23k MongoDB databases and threatens to contact GDPR authorities. “A hacker has uploaded ransom notes on 22,900 MongoDB databases left exposed online without a password, a number that accounts for roughly 47% of all MongoDB databases accessible online, ZDNet has learned today. The hacker is using an automated script to scan for misconfigured MongoDB databases, wiping their content, and leaving a ransom note behind asking for a 0.015 bitcoin (~$140) payment.”

ZDNet: New ransomware masquerades as COVID-19 contact-tracing app on your Android device

ZDNet: New ransomware masquerades as COVID-19 contact-tracing app on your Android device. “Researchers from ESET said this week that the ransomware emerged only a few days after Health Canada announced the release of COVID Alert, which will first be tested in Ontario before rolling out nationwide.”

Bleeping Computer: Extortionists threaten to destroy sites in fake ransom attacks

Bleeping Computer: Extortionists threaten to destroy sites in fake ransom attacks. “Scammers are targeting website owners with blackmail messages asking them to pay ransoms between $1,500 and $3,000 in bitcoins to avoid having their sites’ databases leaked and their reputation destroyed. As the fraudsters falsely claim, they exfiltrate the databases to attacker-controlled servers using credentials harvested after exploiting a vulnerability found within the sites’ software.”