JSTOR Daily: JSTOR Companion to the Schomburg Center’s Black Liberation Reading List

JSTOR Daily: JSTOR Companion to the Schomburg Center’s Black Liberation Reading List. “To meet the need for content related to racism, anti-racism, and Black voices, JSTOR has created a complementary, extensive open library to support readers and scholars seeking to engage with BIPOC+Q-authored reading lists, starting with a unique set of resources related to the Schomburg Center’s Black Liberation Reading List.”

Diverse Education: Research Focuses on Lack of Women Authors on Graduate Syllabi

Diverse Education: Research Focuses on Lack of Women Authors on Graduate Syllabi. “In a recent article published in The Journal of Politics, [Dr. Heidi] Hardt’s team reported the findings of their four-year research project. In what the researchers describe as the largest known study of Ph.D.-level assigned reading across a discipline, they analyzed 88,673 readings from 840 syllabi and 65 reading lists used in political science graduate courses….In addition to documenting the gender readings gap, the researchers have also made their Graduate Assignments DataSet (GRADS) publicly available as a free online database for researchers seeking to diversify syllabi or publications.”

Pocket Adds Text-to-Speech in iOS

My favorite read-it-later tool Pocket is now offering a text-to-speech feature on its iOS app. Of course they would do that two days after I deleted the app from my iPhone because I was never using it. “Called Listen, the text-to-speech feature could come in handy if you’re out jogging, driving some place, or simply want to lie down and give your eyes a break. Listen has actually been available to Android users of Pocket for several years now, so it’s great to see it finally make it to iOS. For sure, iPhone users intent on listening to their saved articles could always highlight text and hit ‘speak’, but a proper feature built into the app is definitely the way to go.”

Professors Crowdsource a List of Readings for the Charleston Shootings

A professor and a hashtag has turned into a crowdsourced list of readings on the Charleston shootings. “The professor [Chad Williams] reached out to the historians Kidada E. Williams (no relation), a professor at Wayne State University; Keisha N. Blaine, an incoming professor at the University of Iowa; and Christopher Cameron, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte who is the founder of the African American Intellectual History Society. The four scholars solicited suggestions on Twitter under the hashtag #CharlestonSyllabus, and the project quickly took off.” Note that the list at http://aaihs.org/resources/charlestonsyllabus/ is no longer accepting suggestions, but contributors are asked to continue to use the #CharlestonSyllabus hashtag; a TheCharlestonSyllabus.com Web site is under development.