Niagara Gazette: Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service goes online

Niagara Gazette: Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service goes online. “In 1987, Bob Sikorkski founded the Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service. It’s designed to give people who are blind, have low vision or have other print disabilities, the ability to hear books as well as local publications. On July 31, they took, their service online for streaming and podcasting. Previously, listeners would have to get a special radio to be able to listen in.” I checked in on the stream. It is not location-restricted and is free to listen to.

How-To Geek: 7 Tips to Make the Web More Readable on an iPhone

How-To Geek: 7 Tips to Make the Web More Readable on an iPhone. “You probably spend more time reading on your iPhone than you do texting, calling, or playing games. Most of that content is likely on the web, and it’s not always easy to see or scroll through. Fortunately, there are plenty of hidden features that can make reading on your iPhone a much more pleasant experience.”

Irish Examiner: New website helps people with dyslexia improve reading

Irish Examiner: New website helps people with dyslexia improve reading. “Computer science student Kevin Cogan created the platform so it can be adapted to suit an individual’s needs. The software can be downloaded as a Google Chrome extension so that dyslex.ie can be used across all sites and online scripts.” Not entirely free; there is a premium version that unlocks all features, but according to the article it starts at a modest €2 a month (about $2.25 USD.)

Baltimore Magazine: The Womanist Reader Creates an Online Library of Black Literature

Baltimore Magazine: The Womanist Reader Creates an Online Library of Black Literature. “Named after Layli Phillips’ 2006 anthology, The Womanist Reader is an Instagram account that acts as a free online library and features PDF texts from Black female writers across the African diaspora.”

Bloomberg Opinion: Can Independent Bookstores Survive Covid-19?

Bloomberg Opinion: Can Independent Bookstores Survive Covid-19?. “The pandemic has crushed independent booksellers across the country so ferociously, their futures are as precarious as they’ve ever been. There were about 1,887 independent book-selling companies running 2,524 stores nationwide in 2019, up from 1,401 booksellers running 1,651 stores a decade earlier, according to the American Booksellers Association. It’s hard to see how this growth spurt won’t be reversed now, given how many booksellers say they’re struggling to remain afloat. During the first few weeks of the corona-crisis alone, the Book Industry Charitable Foundation, a nonprofit that supports indies, received applications for emergency financial support from more than 670 booksellers.”

Fortune: E-book reading is booming during the coronavirus pandemic

Fortune: E-book reading is booming during the coronavirus pandemic. “The COVID-19 crisis forced bookstores and libraries to close across the country, which has ignited a revival in reading electronic books. The e-book market had been in decline for the past six years, but now that it’s one of the easiest ways to get new books during the pandemic, libraries and publishers report a surge of new interest.”

Free online children’s books: Read these with your kids before bed (Film Daily)

Film Daily: Free online children’s books: Read these with your kids before bed. “Kids can whip through books faster than parents know what to do with themselves, and as kids get older they need books to cater to their reading level. It can be a lot to keep up with. Sometimes there isn’t always time to go to a bookstore or library – and it’s especially difficult these days with the pandemic. There is another option though – free online books. Children’s books have a number of options when it comes to accessibility. Many websites provide books for children for free, because they believe learning and reading are important. We’ve put together a list of some great options when it comes to bedtime stories.”

Neowin: Google launches app for helping kids to read in over 180 countries

Neowin: Google launches app for helping kids to read in over 180 countries. “Google’s speech-based app designed to help children learn to read is now available in early access in more than 180 countries. The app was originally launched in India in March of last year as ‘Bolo’, and its global release introduces a new name for the app: Read Along.”

Make Tech Easier: 4 Best Reader Extensions for Chrome Reviewed

Make Tech Easier: 4 Best Reader Extensions for Chrome Reviewed . “The Internet is a simultaneously informative and distracting place, replete with information but also with a thousand panes, links, sidebars and banners that try to pull you away from what you’re reading at a given moment. A reader extension helps keep you focused by removing all the extraneous bits and just leaving you with the stuff you’re reading. These extensions also let you change font sizes, styles, and backgrounds for optimized reading. They’re handy, so we’ve decided to test four of the best reader extensions for Google Chrome and tell you just how good they really are.”

Wizarding World: Introducing the next phase of Harry Potter At Home

Wizarding World: Introducing the next phase of Harry Potter At Home. “With so many of us still staying at home, we are asking friends from the Wizarding World and beyond to read all seventeen chapters of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone/Sorcerer’s Stone for us. Some of the best-loved faces from global entertainment, music and sport have lent their voices to the story they love by recording videos of themselves reading the timeless first Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone/Sorcerer’s Stone.”

Book Riot: How To Find Bookish Joy In A Time Of Quarantine

Book Riot: How To Find Bookish Joy In A Time Of Quarantine. “I have to make a conscious effort to finish a book, since I find myself easily swayed by the siren-like call of a new book. This means that my book cap goal has gone out the window. I haven’t listened to hardly any audiobooks, since I’m not commuting anymore. And my drinking has increased slightly since this all began. But, I am still trying to make lemonade margaritas out of the lemons being lobbed by life right now. I wanted to share some bookish things have brought me joy while grown-up grounded.”

Screen Rant: Free Digital Comics Are Helping Fans Get Through Coronavirus Lockdown

Screen Rant: Free Digital Comics Are Helping Fans Get Through Coronavirus Lockdown. “The Coronavirus pandemic has thrown the comic book industry for a loop, giving fans week after week without new comics for the first time in years. To make matters worse, their favorite superheroes, characters, and senses of humor have gone missing when they’re needed most, as millions around the world weather the storm in isolation. To help those comic readers during this difficult time, some creators and publishers have come to the rescue by releasing free digital content while the printed weekly issues and trade paperbacks are unavailable. We’ve rounded up some of those that are currently providing fans with the best online content for free.”

Internet Archive: The National Emergency Library – Who Needs It? Who Reads It? Lessons from the First Two Weeks

Internet Archive: The National Emergency Library – Who Needs It? Who Reads It? Lessons from the First Two Weeks. “At a time when every day can feel like a month, it’s hard to believe that the National Emergency Library has only existed for two weeks. Recognizing the unique challenges of connecting students and readers with books now on shelves they cannot reach, the Internet Archive loosened the restrictions on our controlled digital lending library to allow increased lending of materials. Reactions have been passionate, to say the least—elation by teachers able to access our virtual stacks, concern by authors about the program’s impact, and fundamental questions about our role as a library in these dire times when one billion students worldwide are cut off from their classrooms and libraries.”

3 News Las Vegas: UNLV creates ‘story time’ resource for children & families

3 News Las Vegas: UNLV creates ‘story time’ resource for children & families. “UNLV has created a ‘story time’ resource for children and families amid the coronavirus outbreak. The university’s College of Education is creating read-aloud videos to recreate storytime for kids virtually while libraries and schools stay closed. An online library of nearly 50 stories is available, along with other videos and resources for parents and teachers, with new videos uploaded daily.”