Protocol: Two former Googlers launched an app to keep you on foodtok forever

Protocol: Two former Googlers launched an app to keep you on foodtok forever. “Former Google engineer François Chu and Alejandro Oropeza, YouTube’s former global head of creator marketing, launched Flavrs earlier this week with the hopes that users will use the app as a dedicated platform for finding recipes, learning how to cook them and buying the necessary ingredients. The platform has raised $7 million in seed funding from support from Andreessen Horowitz, Wellington Access Ventures and celebrity chefs including Eric Ripert.”

University of Wyoming: UW Extension Releases New High-Altitude Cookbook

University of Wyoming: UW Extension Releases New High-Altitude Cookbook. “University of Wyoming Extension recently released its new ‘High-Altitude Baking’ cookbook, a collection of original elevation-adjusted and user-tested recipes ranging from cakes and cookies to scones, muffins, breads and pizza. Available in print and online, the publication offers more than 100 tasty altitude-adjusted recipes, all tested at both 3,500 feet and 7,200 feet (and other elevations in between).” The online version is free to download.

Do not try this at home: Medieval medicine under the spotlight in major new project (University of Cambridge)

University of Cambridge: Do not try this at home: Medieval medicine under the spotlight in major new project. “Curious Cures in Cambridge Libraries – a new two-year project to digitise, catalogue and conserve over 180 medieval manuscripts – has launched at Cambridge University Library. It will focus on manuscripts containing approximately 8,000 unedited medical recipes and will bring together unique and irreplaceable handwritten books from across the world-class collections of the University Library, the Fitzwilliam Museum and a dozen Cambridge colleges.”

New York Times: Family Recipes Etched in Stone. Gravestone, That Is.

New York Times: Family Recipes Etched in Stone. Gravestone, That Is.. “At his home in Washington, D.C., Charlie McBride often bakes his mother’s recipe for peach cobbler. As he pours the topping over the fruit, he remembers how his mother, aunts and grandmother sat under a tree in Louisiana, cackling at one another’s stories as they peeled peaches to can for the winter. Mr. McBride loved this family recipe so much that when his mother, O’Neal Bogan Watson, died in 2005, he had it etched on her gravestone in New Ebenezer Cemetery in Castor, La., a town of about 230 people.”

Davis Enterprise: Yan donates archive to UCD

Davis Enterprise: Yan donates archive to UCD. “World-renowned celebrity chef Martin Yan’s collection of nearly 3,000 cookbooks, his first wok, thousands of photographs and other media will be the main ingredients in an archive to be established in his name at UC Davis. Yan and his wife, Susan, both UC Davis graduates, recently gifted the items and funds to create the Chef Martin Yan Legacy Archive in the UC Davis Library Archives and Special Collections.”

Penobscot Bay Pilot: New website for affordable, nutritious recipes

Penobscot Bay Pilot: New website for affordable, nutritious recipes. “Good Shepherd Food Bank, Maine’s largest hunger relief organization, is launching… a one-stop online resource to find simple, nutritious, and easy-to-make recipes using everyday ingredients. Created by the Food Bank’s Nutrition and Education team, the site allows users to search through hundreds of recipes to see what they can make with items in their pantries, cupboards and refrigerators. Many of the recipes include ingredients distributed by the Food Bank’s network of over 500 partner agencies.”

Mashable: The 7 TikTok recipes of 2021 that actually deserved the hype

Mashable: The 7 TikTok recipes of 2021 that actually deserved the hype. “Where I was once skeptical, I am now a convert: TikTok is fantastic for people who love cooking, eating, and learning about food. There are a lot of talented cooks and creators on the app — a personal favorite is chef @sad_papi — but there are those singular dishes that transcend the platform to become global trends in and of themselves. This year, certain TikTok recipes, somehow, someway, ended up just as popular as the renegade dance. We’re talking ‘ingredients became hard to find’ popular.

Irish Times: The social media chefs demystifying the kitchen for a new generation

Irish Times: The social media chefs demystifying the kitchen for a new generation. “Despite me writing a recipe for feta bake in a national newspaper back in 2013, it took a 30-second video to make a version of it a viral hit last year. The TikTok platform made it easy to share and spread, creating a worldwide spike in feta cheese sales. Being shown how easy this delicious dish is to make has been key to its popularity, as well as the visual element of those bursting tomatoes and yielding soft cheese making it look so appetising.”

New York Times: Who Owns a Recipe? A Plagiarism Claim Has Cookbook Authors Asking.

New York Times: Who Owns a Recipe? A Plagiarism Claim Has Cookbook Authors Asking.. “U.S. copyright law seeks to protect ‘original works of authorship’ by barring unauthorized copying of all kinds of creative material: sheet music, poetry, architectural works, paintings and even computer software. But recipes are much harder to protect. This is a reason they frequently reappear, often word for word, in one book or blog after another.”

Wired: How to Preserve and Share Grandma’s Recipes

Wired: How to Preserve and Share Grandma’s Recipes. “WHEN I INHERITED my late grandmother’s recipes, I wanted to keep them safe and eventually hand them down to my own family. I already had my own jumbled collection, including instructions dictated by Wilma herself, images saved on my phone, Word files on my computer, and more. So I set out to find a way to organize, preserve, and share this part of our family history with everyone.”

Snapchat: Food Scan is inspiring the next generation of cooks, and it’s as easy as pie

Snapchat: Food Scan is inspiring the next generation of cooks, and it’s as easy as pie. “Food Scan can parse and understand foods and ingredients you have right in front of you using computer vision. Then, our Camera connects what it sees to suggestions from Allrecipes, changing the way Snapchatters cook, grocery shop, and find recipe inspiration. So, if you have an extra carton of eggs chilling in the refrigerator, Scan them and relevant recipes will be immediately at hand — everything from huevos rancheros to bacon devilled eggs. Just open your Snapchat Camera, point it at the egg, and press the Scan button to get started.”

Eater San Francisco: A New Recipe Website Promises to Help Creators Actually Get Paid For Their Work

Eater San Francisco: A New Recipe Website Promises to Help Creators Actually Get Paid For Their Work. “The founders are billing Foody as ‘a recipe content marketplace for food lovers and culinary creators.’ They say a chef, cookbook author, social media personality, or anyone can upload a recipe to the site, and customize it by adding an intro, photos, or videos. Many recipes start at 99 cents, although they can be priced any way the writer wants and can be bundled into ‘Collections,’ kind of like a digital cookbook. Creators retain the full copyright to their work and are free to publish it elsewhere.”

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage. “The connection between food and cultural heritage couldn’t be stronger. And according to Mexican chef Martha Ortiz, Mexican food is identity…. Martha is one of the chefs who participated in Google Arts & Culture’s latest program, Taste Mexico. It showcases the deep connection between food, culture, legacy and art represented in Mexican food with more than 220 stories, 6000 images and 200 videos from 31 partner institutions.”