Tubefilter: Former Algorithm Engineer Guillaume Chaslot Calls YouTube’s Decision To Stop Recommending Conspiracy Videos “A Historic Victory”

Tubefilter: Former Algorithm Engineer Guillaume Chaslot Calls YouTube’s Decision To Stop Recommending Conspiracy Videos “A Historic Victory”. “Former YouTube engineer Guillaume Chaslot is praising his one-time employer’s decision to stop recommending conspiracy theory videos. ‘YouTube’s announcement is a great victory which will save thousands,’ he tweeted as part of a lengthy thread. ‘It’s only the beginning of a more humane technology. Technology that empowers all of us, instead of deceiving the most vulnerable.'”

New York Times: YouTube Moves to Make Conspiracy Videos Harder to Find

New York Times: YouTube Moves to Make Conspiracy Videos Harder to Find. “Whether it is a video claiming the earth is flat or the moon landing was faked, conspiracy theories are not hard to find on Google’s YouTube. But in a significant policy change, YouTube said on Friday that it planned to stop recommending them.”

Motherboard: Why Did YouTube Mass Recommend That People Watch News Footage of the 9/11 Attacks?

Motherboard: Why Did YouTube Mass Recommend That People Watch News Footage of the 9/11 Attacks?. “Earlier this month, a two-hour newscast from CNN on the morning of the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks started showing up in the recommended section of many users’ feeds, prompting people to question, ‘What did I watch for this to be recommended to me?’ The video itself was uploaded more than five years ago by an account exclusively full of other videos from Sept. 11, 2001 and news coverage of the attacks from that day.”

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations. “With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy. Retailers and free service providers like Facebook and Google reap revenue with these highly curated and targeted advertisements — but at the cost of your data. The recent increase in consumer privacy violations motivated Arizona State University Associate Professor Lalitha Sankar to develop game theoretic models that retailers and service providers can use to help them generate accurate recommendations while guaranteeing consumer privacy.”

Washington Post: Two years after #Pizzagate showed the dangers of hateful conspiracies, they’re still rampant on YouTube

Washington Post: Two years after #Pizzagate showed the dangers of hateful conspiracies, they’re still rampant on YouTube. “A year after YouTube’s chief executive promised to curb ‘problematic’ videos, it continues to harbor and even recommend hateful, conspiratorial videos, allowing racists, anti-Semites and proponents of other extremist views to use the platform as an online library for spreading their ideas.”

Rolling Stone: Pandora Wants to Recommend Your Next Podcast

Rolling Stone: Pandora Wants to Recommend Your Next Podcast. “Two decades ago, Pandora launched the Music Genome Project, a.k.a. the backbone of its Internet radio service, and changed music discovery forever. No longer did fans sift through clunky physical or digital record stores to find new artists to love; Pandora’s meticulous recommendation engine served that all up effortlessly to them. Now, the music company — which has been through tough times of late, reorganizing and figuring out a fresh identity after swinging back from the cusp of bankruptcy — wants to do the same for podcasts.”

New York Times: As Germans Seek News, YouTube Delivers Far-Right Tirades

New York Times: As Germans Seek News, YouTube Delivers Far-Right Tirades. “Ray Serrato, a Berlin-based digital researcher, noticed the tide of misinformation when his wife’s uncle showed him a YouTube video that claimed the rioters had been Muslim refugees. The video, posted by an obscure fringe group, was rambling, and it appeared to be cheaply produced. Yet it had nearly half a million views — far more than any news video on the riots. How was that possible?”