Wired: The Case Against Music Curation

Wired: The Case Against Music Curation. “We are now deep into a decade of lifestyle curation. Our news feeds on Facebook, the movies we catalog on Netflix, the playlists we make and then loop over and over on Apple Music; the need to personalize everything we do, and everything we consume, is meant to remove unnecessary friction from our lives. It’s meant to make things as seamless as possible. Through brainy algorithms and constant curation, singles like ‘Essence’ benefit from that sort of tireless indexing. Eventually, they exist everywhere. But what if that way no longer serves us?”

Investigation: How TikTok’s Algorithm Figures Out Your Deepest Desires (Wall Street Journal)

Wall Street Journal: Investigation: How TikTok’s Algorithm Figures Out Your Deepest Desires. “A Wall Street Journal investigation found that TikTok only needs one important piece of information to figure out what you want: the amount of time you linger over a piece of content. Every second you hesitate or rewatch, the app is tracking you.” This is a video that lasts just over 13 minutes. It is fully-captioned as far as I can tell.

EurekAlert: When consumers trust AI recommendations–or resist them

EurekAlert: When consumers trust AI recommendations–or resist them. “Researchers from Boston University and University of Virginia published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines how consumers respond to AI recommenders when focused on the functional and practical aspects of a product (its utilitarian value) versus the experiential and sensory aspects of a product (its hedonic value).”

MakeUseOf: Searching for the Right YouTube Channel Gets Easier With These 5 Sites

MakeUseOf: Searching for the Right YouTube Channel Gets Easier With These 5 Sites. “YouTube has got a lot better but it’s still tough to search for the best channels. You can find a YouTube channel without knowing the name but it’s often thanks to serendipity or recommendations. YouTube’s own algorithm that suggests videos isn’t perfect either. So, how do you take control of your own YouTube search? Master YouTube’s advanced search to begin with. Or, take the lazy option of using the recommendation sites below.”

Neowin: Spotify is testing a Tastebuds feature to discover music through your friends

Neowin: Spotify is testing a Tastebuds feature to discover music through your friends. “Spotify often comes up with new ways to expand the social aspect of music listening, introducing new ways to share music with others, and even simultaneously control playback with friends. Now, as discovered by well-known reverse engineer Jane Manchun Wong, it looks like Spotify is planning another social feature for its app.”

The Verge: Spotify will ask people what they’re interested in to give them podcast suggestions

The Verge: Spotify will ask people what they’re interested in to give them podcast suggestions. “Spotify wants more people to listen to podcasts, so it’s making the process of finding one that interests you even easier. Starting this week, the company will include a button on free users’ homepages that’ll ask them to pick topics that interest them in order to get podcast recommendations.”

The Verge: HBO launches ‘Recommended by Humans’ tool to help you escape algorithm nightmares

The Verge: HBO launches ‘Recommended by Humans’ tool to help you escape algorithm nightmares. “HBO launched a new website called Recommended by Humans, which pulls from video suggestions and fan tweets to recommend different series or documentaries that people should watch. There are 50 free episodes, movies, and documentaries available on the site, according to a press release from the company, which makes the site feel a little bit like a marketing tool designed to give potential customers a taste of HBO shows to get them to sign up.”

Wired: How Recommendation Algorithms Run the World

Wired: How Recommendation Algorithms Run the World. “What should you watch? What should you read? What’s news? What’s trending? Wherever you go online, companies have come up with very particular, imperfect ways of answering these questions. Everywhere you look, recommendation engines offer striking examples of how values and judgments become embedded in algorithms and how algorithms can be gamed by strategic actors.”

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations. “With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy. Retailers and free service providers like Facebook and Google reap revenue with these highly curated and targeted advertisements — but at the cost of your data. The recent increase in consumer privacy violations motivated Arizona State University Associate Professor Lalitha Sankar to develop game theoretic models that retailers and service providers can use to help them generate accurate recommendations while guaranteeing consumer privacy.”

MakeUseOf: The 11 Best Sites for Finding What Books to Read Next

MakeUseOf: The 11 Best Sites for Finding What Books to Read Next. “There is nothing more daunting than going to a bookstore without a shopping list. So, make sure that your next read is going to be a good one. There are plenty of sites you can use to look up books based on your personal taste, favorite authors and titles, or even based on a specific plot summary or character.”

BuzzFeed: How YouTube’s Channel Recommendations Push Users To The Fringe

BuzzFeed: How YouTube’s Channel Recommendations Push Users To The Fringe. “YouTube’s channel recommendations have helped ‘unite the far-right’ on the platform and actively promote channels that peddle conspiracy theories, according to new research. Jonas Kaiser and Adrian Rauchfleisch’s research paper, ‘Unite the Right? How YouTube’s Recommendation Algorithm Connects the U.S. Far-Right,’ is the first large-scale analysis of the channels that YouTube automatically recommends users subscribe to and visit. They conclude that the channel recommendation algorithm pushes users to more fringe and extreme channels, such as Alex Jones of Infowars, while also elevating far-right voices above others.”