The Conversation: New Data Set Explores 90 Years of Natural Disasters in the U.S.

The Conversation: New Data Set Explores 90 Years of Natural Disasters in the U.S.. “Our research team wanted to know how disasters affect people’s decisions to move in or out of particular areas. We created a new database that covers disasters in the United States from 1920 to 2010 at the county level, combining data from the American Red Cross as well as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and its predecessors.”

Washington Post: Here’s what Facebook’s doing with your Safety Check data

Washington Post: Here’s what Facebook’s doing with your Safety Check data. “Facebook’s Safety Check feature allows users to notify their family and friends that they’re okay after natural disasters or attacks that prompt Facebook to deploy the tool. But have you ever wondered what Facebook does with that information? On Wednesday the social network announced that it will share some of that data with aid organizations — specifically UNICEF, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and the World Food Program — to make it easier for them to locate people who need help.”

British Red Cross Completes Online Archive of WWI Volunteers

The British Red Cross has completed its online archive of WWI volunteers. “Today, the British Red Cross celebrates the completion of an online archive of more than 244,000 personnel index cards, which provide a new picture of their work on the home front and overseas…. The collection of index cards, which is now more than 100 years old, includes VADs’ [Voluntary Aid Detachments] names and details such as where they worked…”

International Committee of the Red Cross Opens New Multimedia Archive

The International Committee of The Red Cross has opened a new multimedia archive. “This new online platform will give the public direct access to 153 years of the organization’s audiovisual history. The searchable platform, which is available in both English and French, contains more than 93,000 digitized and downloadable photos, around 1,700 films and videos and over 1,000 audio recordings.”