Wired: Europe’s Move Against Google Analytics Is Just the Beginning

Wired: Europe’s Move Against Google Analytics Is Just the Beginning. “The Austrian decision—and other similar cases currently being considered—highlight the tensions between Europe’s strong privacy laws and what happens to data once it leaves the bloc. Some are optimistic that it could reduce Europe’s reliance on major US technology companies, while others say it highlights the importance of making sure negotiators from both sides strike a new deal that allows data sharing before data flows and economies are disrupted.”

CNN: Here’s how US lawmakers could finally rein in Facebook

CNN: Here’s how US lawmakers could finally rein in Facebook. “Despite their agreement that something should be done to address Big Tech’s dominance -— and to crack down on Meta in particular — Democrats and Republicans are divided on what the core problem really is. Republicans accuse Facebook of anti-conservative bias, despite a lack of evidence, while Democrats are concerned that the company doesn’t do enough to protect against hate speech, misinformation and other problematic content. The stakes for action, or inaction, are only growing.”

Irish Examiner: New law regulating social media and streaming services to be approved by Cabinet

Irish Examiner: New law regulating social media and streaming services to be approved by Cabinet. “The bill will establish a new media commission, which will include an online safety commissioner. The new body will be responsible for overseeing updated regulations for broadcasting and video-on-demand services, such as Netflix and Disney+, and the new regulatory framework for online safety.”

Regulate, break up, open up: how to fix Facebook in 2022 (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Regulate, break up, open up: how to fix Facebook in 2022. “This year the public saw an alarming side of Facebook, after a huge leak of internal documents revealed the extent of vaccine misinformation and extremism on the platform, a two-tier system of who gets to break the rules and the toxic effects of Instagram for teens. Digital rights activists around the world have warned about these issues for years, but with the company facing mounting pressure, next year could provide an unprecedented opportunity for action.”

Report: US ISPs Aren’t Transparent About Prices And Speeds, And Regulators Generally Don’t Care (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Report: US ISPs Aren’t Transparent About Prices And Speeds, And Regulators Generally Don’t Care . “By now we’ve well established that regional monopolization, limited competition, and the (state and federal) corruption that enables both (aka regulatory capture) are why US broadband is spotty, expensive, and slow. With neither competent regulatory oversight nor meaningful competition to drive improvements, regional dominant broadband providers simply… don’t bother.”

Harvard Business School Working Knowledge: COVID-19 Shines New Light on Working Conditions in Supply Chains

Harvard Business School Working Knowledge: COVID-19 Shines New Light on Working Conditions in Supply Chains. “Tightly packed workers and other weak protections allowed COVID-19 to sweep through American slaughterhouses during the past year, infecting at least 45,000 employees and killing an estimated 240 people. To Harvard Business School Professor Michael Toffel, who has studied working conditions for more than 20 years, the devastation in meatpacking is just one example of how lax regulation can make a grave situation deadly.”

The Next Web: Facebook should stop trying to disrupt payments with Libra and focus on repair

The Next Web: Facebook should stop trying to disrupt payments with Libra and focus on repair. “When companies attempt to enter new highly regulated markets, regulators typically look at the company’s intentions and previous compliance. Facebook has a long history of willful neglect of their consumers’ privacy, as evidenced by numerous disclosures, including a document seizure by the United Kingdom’s parliament.”

Bloomberg Quint: Facebook and Google Feel Chill From Once-Friendly Washington

Bloomberg Quint: Facebook and Google Feel Chill From Once-Friendly Washington. “Washington officials once dazzled by the swashbuckling entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley are now openly questioning the freedom they’ve bestowed on Facebook Inc., Twitter Inc. and Google. Emboldened by a president who’s openly contemptuous of the companies — despite his own reliance on Twitter — and intelligence reports linking popular online sites to election interference, lawmakers from both parties grilled top tech executives this week about whether, and how, Washington should rein them in.”

The Globe and Mail: Jim Balsillie urges MPs to regulate ‘surveillance capitalism’ of Facebook and Google

The Globe and Mail: Jim Balsillie urges MPs to regulate ‘surveillance capitalism’ of Facebook and Google. “A group representing Canada’s tech CEOs told MPs that Facebook and Google represent a new form of ‘surveillance capitalism’ and called for European-style regulation over the U.S.-based web giants. Jim Balsillie, chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators, told MPs that immediate government action is required to protect Canada’s commercial interests and the privacy of individuals.”

Washington Post: The agency in charge of policing Facebook and Google is 103 years old. Can it modernize?

Washington Post: The agency in charge of policing Facebook and Google is 103 years old. Can it modernize?. “Facebook and Google must answer to new cops on the beat — a group of five fresh Washington regulators at the Federal Trade Commission who have the power to punish Silicon Valley if it misbehaves. But veterans of the 103-year-old watchdog say that the agency, without more cash, a more cutting-edge staff and stronger legal teeth, increasingly runs the risk of being outmatched by the very tech giants it oversees.”

New York Times: What if Platforms Like Facebook Are Too Big to Regulate?

New York Times: What if Platforms Like Facebook Are Too Big to Regulate?. “Social-media companies aren’t new to defending themselves in ideological terms — they’re just not used to doing it on their home turf. While to authoritarian regimes, the threat of social media is obvious, in the United States, Facebook, Twitter and Google have for years talked about themselves freely in the language of democracy, participation and connectivity. The emerging tension between internet platforms and democratic governments, however, seems to stem less from their obvious rhetorical differences than from their similarities.”

Bank Underground: A CAMEL ride: Retracing the history of UK banking through a new historical database

Bank Underground: A CAMEL ride: Retracing the history of UK banking through a new historical database. “Navigational aids are helpful when visibility is poor or when landmarks are unfamiliar, especially when journeying to new destinations. In a recent working paper, we introduce a new regulatory dataset, the ‘Historical Banking Regulatory Database’ (HBRD), that provides a clearer view of the UK banking sector and helps navigate issues difficult to explore with other datasets. This post describes the HBRD, its benefits for research and policy analyses, and what can be learned from it.”

Open Democracy UK: We need European regulation of Facebook and Google

Open Democracy UK: We need European regulation of Facebook and Google. “Facebook and Google are now the dominant media powers in the world. Up till now, they have resisted being treated as media companies despite the sheer and unparalleled power they exert. They argue that they are widening the base of user-generated content and its distribution, bringing communities together, providing platforms for media companies to reach new audiences, and are thus promoting competition. Well, they are now of such a size that it is impossible to argue that their dominance does not raise worrying issues about media pluralism. There is a wide and growing range of other media organisations, civil society activists and academics who believe that media pluralism is under threat, that there are new issues of power, concentration and dominance not adequately captured in existing competition rules or tests, and that action is needed. The immediate forum for […]