New York Times: Scanning an Ancient Biblical Text That Humans Fear to Open

New York Times: Scanning an Ancient Biblical Text That Humans Fear to Open. “In a basement laboratory of the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, an X-ray scanner is pumping invisible beams into a clump of charred parchment leaves that looks as delicate as a long dead flower. The leaves are the remains of a severely scorched early book, or codex, which was written in southern Egypt some time between 400 and 600 A.D. It contains the Acts of the Apostles, one of the books of the New Testament, possibly bound with another work. The writing is Coptic, the language of Egypt before the Arab conquest in 642 A.D.”

Irish Genealogy News: C19th editions join online Church of Ireland Gazette

Irish Genealogy News: C19th editions join online Church of Ireland Gazette. “The Church of Ireland’s record repository, Representative Church Body Library (RCBL), has announced that all 19th-century editions of the Church of Ireland Gazette have been added to the online archive of the weekly newspaper. This upload means a full archive of editions published from 1856 to 1923 is now freely accessible.”

National Catholic Register: Priests Make Use of Social Media to Reach Their Flocks

National Catholic Register: Priests Make Use of Social Media to Reach Their Flocks. “Because of the ever-increasing popularity of social media, quite a few priests use it to reach out to their flocks as a form of ministry. Father Leo Patalinghug, who has 75,000 followers on Facebook, 16,000 on Twitter and 7,000 on Instagram, sees it as a means of evangelization. ‘It’s just the new “areopagus” of St. Paul’s time.’ He added, ‘It’s important for various Catholic institutions, parishes and organizations to have a social-media presence.'”

Tennessean: How social media changes the way serpent handling pastors spread the gospel

Tennessean: How social media changes the way serpent handling pastors spread the gospel. “Social media can serve as a window into the lives of the latest generation of serpent handling pastors spreading the gospel throughout Appalachia. Author and journalist Julia C. Duin explores that idea in her newest book, ‘In the House of the Serpent Handler,’ which was published recently by The University of Tennessee Press.”

United Dioceses of Dublin & Glendalough: The Red Book of Ossory Digitized and Online

United Dioceses of Dublin & Glendalough: The Red Book of Ossory Digitized and Online. “As efforts in the RCB Library to digitize and make available its resources to a worldwide audience continue, one of its most significant medieval manuscripts, TheRed Book of Ossory (RCB Library D11/2/1), is now available for public consultation on the Church of Ireland website…. The Red Book of Ossory contains 79 vellum leaves, and was composed largely in the 14th century during [Richard] Ledred’s time. Later entries were added, the latest from the reign of Elizabeth I. The Red Book derives its name from the colour of the leather binding, faded on the outside, but still visible inside the cover. Like other medieval episcopal registers, it contains a wide range of documents that defy classification, the choice of which depended on what was important to individual bishops, in this case by Ledred, whom Dr Empey makes clear in his presentation was ‘one of the most extraordinary bishops ever to occupy the see of Ossory’.” RCB Library stands for Representative Church Body Library.

Digital NC: Partner Wake Forest University contributes 19 new newspaper titles

Digital NC: Partner Wake Forest University contributes 19 new newspaper titles. “Thanks to our partner, Wake Forest University, there are 19 new newspapers added to DigitalNC. Dating from 1857 to 1925, these newspapers were written for Christian communities from the mountains to the Piedmont to the coast of North Carolina. Most of the newspapers are affiliated with the Baptist denomination, and their audiences vary in size and geography. Some were published for specific churches, like the Broad Street Worker “Devoted to the interests of Broad St. Baptist Church” in Winston, N.C. Others were published for a wider audience by regional, state, or national organizations, like the North Carolina Baptist Missionary Worker and The Gospel Herald published by the Boards of the Baptist State Convention, and the Conflict published by the Anti-Evolution League of America.”

PR Newswire: KAICIID Launches Global Database of Knowledge on Interreligious Dialogue (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: KAICIID Launches Global Database of Knowledge on Interreligious Dialogue (PRESS RELEASE). “The International Dialogue Centre (KAICIID) today launched an online database of resources, publications, and contact directories on interreligious dialogue. The ‘Dialogue Knowledge Hub’ is intended to be a resource for leaders of religious communities, policymakers, researchers, teachers, journalists, students, and anyone seeking to promote interreligious dialogue (IRD) in their communities. The database also provides compelling evidence of the positive contribution of interreligious dialogue to achieving development goals.” If you’re interested in learning more about interreligious dialogue (also known as interfaith dialogue) there’s a good overview here.