Penn State College of Engineering: Twitter data may offer policy makers a glimpse into demand for renewable energy

Penn State College of Engineering: Twitter data may offer policy makers a glimpse into demand for renewable energy. “Tweets could one day help policy makers and energy companies better communicate in near real-time to help customers make better sustainable energy choices, according to a team of researchers. In a study of Twitter data from users in Alaska, researchers found that they could plot how people’s opinions changed about renewable energy over time, as well as what forms of renewable energy were more acceptable, said Somayeh Asadi, assistant professor of architectural engineering, Penn State.”

Australian Energy Market Operator: DER register goes live

Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO): DER register goes live. “On 1 March 2020 Australia will have its first database of distributed energy resources (DER) installed throughout the National Electricity Market (NEM) when the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) launches its DER Register. Distributed energy resources are consumer-owned devices that can generate (rooftop solar) or store electricity (batteries, electric vehicles), or have ‘smart’ capabilities to actively manage energy usage (air conditioners, pool pumps, etc).”

State of Michigan: EGLE launches unique renewable energy ordinance database of Michigan communities

State of Michigan: EGLE launches unique renewable energy ordinance database of Michigan communities. “The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) today launched a unique searchable database of municipal ordinances across Michigan that address siting for renewable energy installations. The database was developed in collaboration with the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. Over half of Michigan’s more than 1,800 municipalities have considered renewable energy in their zoning ordinances. The renewable energy zoning database is the first compilation of all renewable energy ordinances across the state and the first database of its kind in the nation.”

Danish Energy Agency: The Ukraine-Denmark Energy Center launches advanced database with open and transparent energy data

Danish Energy Agency: The Ukraine-Denmark Energy Center launches advanced database with open and transparent energy data. “The State Statistics Service of Ukraine (SSSU) and the Danish Energy Agency have launched a database covering three decades of previously disconnected energy data. By documenting developments in energy supply and consumption, the database could play a crucial part in visualizing possible scenarios for reaching Ukraine’s renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy independence targets.”

National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Getting the Big Picture through Better Data

National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Getting the Big Picture through Better Data. “Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind Energy Technologies Office, NREL researchers set about building the first-ever comprehensive, processed U.S. thermal plant performance database for the energy modeling community to use in grid studies.” I now understand thermal plants better thanks to this article in Electrical Easy.

State of Hawaii: State Unveils New Online Tool to Assess Potential of Contaminated Sites for Renewable Energy Development

State of Hawaii: State Unveils New Online Tool to Assess Potential of Contaminated Sites for Renewable Energy Development. “The State of Hawaii has launched a new online mapping tool as part of its Hawaii Brightfields Initiative that will make it easier for land owners, developers, community members, and policymakers to assess the renewable energy potential of contaminated sites and other previously developed parcels statewide in support of Hawaii’s clean energy future.”

Wired: To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

Wired: To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source . “Unlike more predictable sources of energy, the energy produced by a wind farm can vary from day to day, forcing utilities to offload excess supplies and make up for shortages. The solar panels on residential rooftops that feed into the grid pose their own challenges because the grid wasn’t designed to facilitate a two-way flow of energy. To meet those technological challenges, the energy sector is turning to open source software.”