New York Times: Google Seeks to Break Vicious Cycle of Online Slander

New York Times: Google Seeks to Break Vicious Cycle of Online Slander. “For many years, the vicious cycle has spun: Websites solicit lurid, unverified complaints about supposed cheaters, sexual predators, deadbeats and scammers. People slander their enemies. The anonymous posts appear high in Google results for the names of victims. Then the websites charge the victims thousands of dollars to take the posts down. This circle of slander has been lucrative for the websites and associated middlemen — and devastating for victims. Now Google is trying to break the loop.”

New York Times: The Slander Industry

New York Times: The Slander Industry. “To get slander removed, many people hire a ‘reputation management’ company. In my case, it was going to cost roughly $20,000. We soon discovered a secret, hidden behind a smokescreen of fake companies and false identities. The people facilitating slander and the self-proclaimed good guys who help remove it are often one and the same.”

Search Engine Journal: 12 of the Best Tools to Monitor Your Online Reputation

Search Engine Journal: 12 of the Best Tools to Monitor Your Online Reputation. “It’s crucial that you find out about (and deal with) problems before they become a major issue, and that you can provide timely feedback. Monitoring what people say about you online will help you maintain a good reputation. So, how do you keep track of what people are saying about you online? Here are some of the best online reputation monitoring tools for you to check out.”

Phys .org: Study shows nearly no universities ready to deal with social media crisis

Phys .org: Study shows nearly no universities ready to deal with social media crisis. “Not so long ago, social media was a novel way for professionals in higher education to communicate about their institution. Now it’s ubiquitous, and a generation of students are on campus who have never known life without it. Yet, a University of Kansas study shows nearly no institution is ready to deal with a social media-fueled crisis, even if they have policies in place to do so.”

Defamation in the Google age: search engines as publishers of defamatory content (Lexology)

Lexology: Defamation in the Google age: search engines as publishers of defamatory content. “In the recent decision of Defteros v Google LLC [2020] VSC 219, the Supreme Court of Victoria held search engine Google liable for ‘publishing’ defamatory material. In doing so, the decision has extended the reach of defamation to encompass those who make available defamatory material originally published by a third party by way of hyperlinks.”

Wired: How to Clean Up Your Old Social Media Posts

Wired: How to Clean Up Your Old Social Media Posts. “If your social media life spans more than a few years then you might not want friends, family, or prospective employers looking back on the sort of person that you used to be. Here we’ll show you how you can scrub your timelines on the three biggest social platforms, using both built-in tools and third-party add-ons.”

BuzzFeed: Quarantine Has Taught Kids On TikTok How To Be Patient And Adult Influencers How To Apologize

BuzzFeed News: Quarantine Has Taught Kids On TikTok How To Be Patient And Adult Influencers How To Apologize. “There were two Big™ public apologies this week. If you’ve been following and indulging in niche online dramas to keep your mind off the global pandemic, then you know influencer chef Alison Roman and OG YouTuber Colleen Ballinger both issued statements about their controversies.”

The Age (Australia): Melbourne brothel owner sues Google over bad reviews

The Age (Australia): Melbourne brothel owner sues Google over bad reviews. “A South Melbourne brothel owner is taking legal action to force Google to reveal who wrote its bad online reviews, some of which direct customers to a nearby competitor. The Boardroom of Melbourne, which bills itself as one of the city’s top brothels, wants the Federal Court to force Google to hand over the IP addresses linked with the negative reviews after the search engine giant refused to reveal the identities behind them and take them down.”

CBS News: CBS News investigation finds fraudulent court orders used to change Google search results

CBS News: CBS News investigation finds fraudulent court orders used to change Google search results. “A Google search can reveal negative information about anyone or any company. Since it’s difficult to change those results, many small businesses are paying thousands to so-called reputation management companies to make negative web pages disappear. Much of the work is legitimate, but a CBS News investigation into online reputation management found some companies hired to clean up Google searches appear to be engaging in criminal activity.”

Lifehacker: How to Clean Up and Archive Your Twitter Account

Lifehacker: How to Clean Up and Archive Your Twitter Account. “I used to save my data on services forever—in case I ever needed to take a trip down memory lane—but I’ve recently found lots of relief and joy in purging my Twitter account of old tweets. Will I ever miss some dumb thing I posted back in 2008? Probably not. Could someone search Twitter’s archives and tell me what a jerk I was about my old, inane tweets? Very possibly.”

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters. “Research by UCLA Anderson’s Brett Hollenbeck, University of Toronto’s Sridhar Moorthy and University of Southern California’s Davide Proserpio suggests that hotels with favorable overall consumer reviews have been able to treat those ratings as a substitute for advertising: They have notably reduced ad spending as their online quality ratings have risen. By contrast, hotels with relatively poor online reviews have had to use ad spending to substitute for their lack of strong consumer recommendations, according to the paper, forthcoming in Marketing Science.”