BBC: Google ordered to reveal author of Australian dentist’s bad review

BBC: Google ordered to reveal author of Australian dentist’s bad review. “An Australian court has ordered Google to identify the person behind an anonymous bad review of a dentist. Dr Matthew Kabbabe, a teeth-whitening specialist in Melbourne, sought the order so he could sue for defamation.”

The Wall Street Journal: How the 1% Scrubs Its Image Online

The Wall Street Journal: How the 1% Scrubs Its Image Online. “Prominent figures from Jacob Gottlieb to Betsy DeVos got help from a reputation management firm that can bury image-sensitive Google results by placing flattering content on websites that masquerade as news outlets.”

CBS News: CBS News investigation finds fraudulent court orders used to change Google search results

CBS News: CBS News investigation finds fraudulent court orders used to change Google search results. “A Google search can reveal negative information about anyone or any company. Since it’s difficult to change those results, many small businesses are paying thousands to so-called reputation management companies to make negative web pages disappear. Much of the work is legitimate, but a CBS News investigation into online reputation management found some companies hired to clean up Google searches appear to be engaging in criminal activity.”

Lifehacker: How to Clean Up and Archive Your Twitter Account

Lifehacker: How to Clean Up and Archive Your Twitter Account. “I used to save my data on services forever—in case I ever needed to take a trip down memory lane—but I’ve recently found lots of relief and joy in purging my Twitter account of old tweets. Will I ever miss some dumb thing I posted back in 2008? Probably not. Could someone search Twitter’s archives and tell me what a jerk I was about my old, inane tweets? Very possibly.”

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters. “Research by UCLA Anderson’s Brett Hollenbeck, University of Toronto’s Sridhar Moorthy and University of Southern California’s Davide Proserpio suggests that hotels with favorable overall consumer reviews have been able to treat those ratings as a substitute for advertising: They have notably reduced ad spending as their online quality ratings have risen. By contrast, hotels with relatively poor online reviews have had to use ad spending to substitute for their lack of strong consumer recommendations, according to the paper, forthcoming in Marketing Science.”

Search Engine Journal: 5 Tools to Track Your Brand Mentions on Social Media

Search Engine Journal: 5 Tools to Track Your Brand Mentions on Social Media . “People have been talking about products and brands since forever: exchanging recommendations, complaining, talking about ads, or mentioning a brand in passing. These discussions are now happening on social media, and you have a chance to monitor and tap in these conversations.”