Rest of World: Loan apps ruined their reputations. A shady online market offered to repair them

Rest of World: Loan apps ruined their reputations. A shady online market offered to repair them. “The economic condition in Nigeria has caused an increase in the demand for soft loans, which come with high interest rates and short repayment periods, often only a week or two. As collateral, the apps ask for financial details, and access to read private data such as users’ location, media files and photographs, and contacts. When people fail to repay at the given time, the apps respond by sending messages threatening litigation, defamation, and even voodoo attacks.”

XDA: If Google wants to be taken seriously, it needs to find ways to assure users it won’t kill new products

XDA: If Google wants to be taken seriously, it needs to find ways to assure users it won’t kill new products. “Google’s biggest issue is that its own brand is now associated with killing services that don’t start on the right foot. If people are afraid to invest in Stadia (for fear of it shutting down), then it’s only going to be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Obviously, people wouldn’t want to invest in a service that everyone sees is doomed to fail. It’s clear that Google needs to find a way past that perception. The problem is: how?”

New York Times: How Dan Price’s Social Media Fame Fueled Abuse Allegations

New York Times: How Dan Price’s Social Media Fame Fueled Abuse Allegations. “Mr. Price’s internet fame has enabled a pattern of abuse in his personal life and hostile behavior at his company, interviews with more than 50 people, documents and police reports show. He has used his celebrity to pursue women online who say he hurt them, both physically and emotionally. Ms. [Kacie] Margis is one of more than a dozen women who spoke to The New York Times about predatory encounters with Mr. Price.”

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment. “Australians are invited to have their say on new proposals released today to modernise national defamation law for search engines and social media sites. NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman said the reforms, led by NSW, focus on the extent to which internet intermediaries should be liable for reputation-damaging material published by third party users online.”

Digital Trails: How Bungie Identified a Mass Sender of Fake DMCA Notices (TorrentFreak)

TorrentFreak: Digital Trails: How Bungie Identified a Mass Sender of Fake DMCA Notices. “In response to persons unknown sending large numbers of fake DMCA notices to YouTube while impersonating its anti-piracy partner, Bungie filed a lawsuit in the US seeking millions in damages. At the time the name of the ‘Doe’ defendant was unknown. This is how a Bungie investigation followed digital breadcrumbs to track down and identify that person by name and physical address.”

CNBC: Amazon is flying internet influencers to luxurious resorts in bid for social media clout

CNBC: Amazon is flying internet influencers to luxurious resorts in bid for social media clout. “For three days in May, more than a dozen stars of Instagram, YouTube and TikTok convened in the coastal town of Todos Santos, Mexico, where they were treated to sunset dinners and spa sessions. It’s the type of luxurious weekend that internet influencers have come to expect from the growing number of companies trying to capitalize of their online fame. But the event on Mexico’s Pacific Coast wasn’t run by one of the powerhouses of social media. It was hosted by Amazon.”

CBS News: China discreetly paid for U.S. social media influencers to tout Beijing Winter Olympics

CBS News: China discreetly paid for U.S. social media influencers to tout Beijing Winter Olympics. “The social media posts fanned across a variety of popular Instagram and TikTok accounts that have a combined following of 5 million people who follow their videos, photos and content about travel destinations, sports, fashion and women’s issues. The Chinese Consulate in New York paid $300,000 to New Jersey-based firm Vippi Media to recruit the influencers. The posts were not properly labeled as ads in the way that TikTok and Instagram requires.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Google admits John Barilaro was defamed in YouTube videos, court told

Sydney Morning Herald: Google admits John Barilaro was defamed in YouTube videos, court told. “Internet giant Google has agreed it published defamatory claims about former NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro in two YouTube videos and when the case proceeds to trial next week it will mainly explore how much should be paid in damages, a court has been told. Mr Barilaro sued Google, which owns YouTube, and political commentator Jordan Shanks in the Federal Court last year alleging he was defamed by videos published on the Friendlyjordies channel titled bruz and Secret Dictatorship.”

Vanity Fair: Metamates Unite! Zuck’s Rebrand Is Full Steam Ahead

Vanity Fair: Metamates Unite! Zuck’s Rebrand Is Full Steam Ahead. “Meta, the company formerly known as Facebook, appears to be confronting the reality that a name change is not enough to overcome its existential crisis. A series of moves this week shows how Meta is trying to rebrand not only its products but its strategic response, the deficiencies of which were laid bare in its reaction to last year’s Facebook Files leak.”

When a Logo Doesn’t Risk It All: Meta’s Brand Is Designed for Unknown Worlds (New York Times)

New York Times: When a Logo Doesn’t Risk It All: Meta’s Brand Is Designed for Unknown Worlds. “To design experts, the change by a scandal-plagued company was the latest example of efforts by corporate America to create brands that are less unique and ultimately less offensive. It was also a reflection of the growing challenge for corporate identities to exist in many different sizes and digital settings at once, from V.R. headsets to smartwatches — a challenge that is magnified for Meta as it tries to establish an identity for something that largely doesn’t exist yet.”

The Verge: Updating The Verge’s background policy

The Verge: Updating The Verge’s background policy. “Today, The Verge is updating our public ethics policy to be clearer in our interactions with public relations and corporate communications professionals. We’re doing this because big tech companies in particular have hired a dizzying array of communications staff who routinely push the boundaries of acceptable sourcing in an effort to deflect accountability, pass the burden of truth to the media, and generally control the narratives around the companies they work for while being annoying as hell to deal with.”